Primary healthcare

Below are a selection of key resources covering primary health care including many of the classic publications as well as more recent resources on issues around poverty and health. This list was compiled to coincide with a debate organised by Healthlink Worldwide in April 2003: Is primary health care a relevant strategy in today's world.

Selected resources

Books, reports, etc

False dawn : why the proposed global fund will disappoint millions of people affected by HIV/AIDS in poor countries

CHRISTIAN AID
June 2001

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This article discusses the 'inherent flaws' in the idea of setting up a global fund to fight HIV/AIDS and other major diseases. It frames these as poverty-related, rather than health problems and describes the funding shortfall for development against G8 commitments. It gives examples of community-led responses concludes that the international community should re-focus on funding, and reforming, existing programmes and approaches rather than risk repeating mistakes in a new global fund

Twenty five years of primary health care : lessons learned and proposals for revitalisation

SANDERS, David
2003

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This report highlights the lessons learned from 25 years of primary health care. It highlights the gains that there have been in health status, but also looks at the setbacks, for example the increased gap between the health of rich and poor, and the resurgence and spread of old communicable diseases and new epidemics. It highlights the mixed progress in implementing primary health care and makes proposals for the revitalisation of primary health care

Journal articles

The future of world health. The new world order and international health

FRENK, Julio
et al
May 1997

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The key point covered in this article is that international cooperation for world health faces unprecedented challenges. The health situation in nations is increasingly influenced by global determinants such as environmental threats, the expanded movement of people and goods that facilitates the spread of pathogens across national borders, and the trade in legal and illegal hazardous substances. After nearly 50 years of activity, the major agencies involved in international health cooperation have not responded adequately to the new picture of change and complexity. Just as national health systems across the globe are engaged in reform efforts, so it is time to reform the world health system. The first step in reform is to achieve a consensus about the essential core functions of international health organisations and about a coordinated division of labour among them