MeTA - Promotion of medicines

Medicines' promotion to agencies, professionals and users should adhere to strict ethical standards. While it may seem straight forward, promotion is a complex area because there can be a fine line between information provision and influence. The resources in this key list are concerned with ensuring ethical standards are followed in promoting and prescribing medicines.

We will add to this key list over time and would welcome suggestions or additions. Please send these to: sourceassistant@hi-uk.org

Selected resources

Books, reports, etc

Ethical issues concerning the relationships between medical practitioners and the pharmaceutical industry

KOMESAROFF, Paul A.
KERRIDGE,Ian H.
February 2002

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This article considers the conflict of interests that can overlap between medical practitioners and the pharmaceutical industry and the influence that associations between the two groups has on doctors' clinical decision making. It recommends that basic principles underlying the conduct of doctors with respect to pharmaceutical companies should be openness and transparency and that clear procedures should be developed to deal with specific issues such as travel subsidies, receipt of gifts, sponsorship of conferences and continuing education activities, and dualities of interest arising in clinical research settings

Measuring transparency to improve good governance in the public pharmaceutical sector : Jordan

NUSEIRAT, Adi
2009

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"This report presents the findings of the first phase of the [World Health Organization's] national Good Governance for Medicines programme in Jordan. The assessment aims to obtain a picture of the level of transparency and potential vulnerability to corruption in the public pharmaceutical sector using WHO’s assessment instrument. In Jordan, the assessment looked at six functions: medicines registration, inspection of pharmaceutical establishments, promotion, selection, procurement and distribution"

Measuring transparency to improve good governance in the public pharmaceutical sector : Lebanon

HAMRA, Rasha
RAIDY, Collette
NAOUS, Maha
2009

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"This report presents the findings of the first phase of the [World Health Organization's] national Good Governance for Medicines programme in Lebanon. The assessment aims to obtain a picture of the level of transparency and potential vulnerability to corruption in the public pharmaceutical sector using WHO’s assessment instrument. In Lebanon, the assessment looked at six functions: medicines registration, inspection of pharmaceutical establishments, promotion, selection, procurement and distribution"

Measuring transparency to improve good governance in the public pharmaceutical sector : Syrian Arab Republic

AL MARDINI, Amer
AL HAKEEM, Souheila
2009

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"This report presents the findings of the first phase of the [World Health Organization's] national Good Governance for Medicines programme in the Syrian Arab Republic. The assessment aims to obtain a picture of the level of transparency and potential vulnerability to corruption in the public pharmaceutical sector using WHO’s assessment instrument. In the Syrian Arab Republic, the assessment looked at eight functions: medicines registration, licensing of pharmaceutical establishments, inspection of pharmaceutical establishments, promotion, selection, clinical trials, procurement and distribution"

Medicines use in primary care in developing and transitional countries : fact book summarizing results from studies reported between 1990 and 2006

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
May 2009

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Irrational use of medicines is one of the most serious global public health problems we face today. Improving use requires regular monitoring and application of effective interventions, both of which are often not done, particularly in many lower income countries. To address this issue, WHO created a database of medicines use in in primary care settings in developing and transitional countries. Quantitative information has been extracted from 679 studies conducted in 97 countries and on 386 interventions (from 313 studies). The medicines use database has allowed the first systematic quantitative review of studies measuring medicines use in developing and transitional countries and the results are now presented

Serials

Journal articles