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Are international health research programmes doing enough to develop research systems and skills in low and middle income countries? Responsible vertical programming : How global health research can deliver essential research, achieve impact and build na

IJSSELMUIDEN, Carel
et al
2007

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This statement from the Council on Health Research for Development considers the responsibility of research programmes carried out in low to middle income countries to build the capacity of a country’s researchers and the national research system, in the process of achieving its own research goals. It sets out 4 problems that need to be addressed: health research needed by developing countries is mostly conducted for them, sometimes with them, but rarely by them; health research in developing countries is problem-specific - or ‘vertical’ and does not usually contribute to building the national system for health research; the questions addressed by health research in developing countries are largely determined by the international community - specifically those funding ‘global health research’; and health research is not seen as a key driver of development in low income countries - which constitutes a missed opportunity towards real and sustainable progress. Also included are a set of practical steps that can be taken to make vertical research programmes more responsible

Monitoring financial flows for health research 2006 : the changing landscape of health research for development

MATLIN, Stephen
DE FRANCISCO, Andres
Eds
2006

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This study aims to provide NGOs and decision-makers with an overview of currently available information on resource flows into health research. It paints the picture of a changing landscape, with an increased number of actors and increases in resources for health promotion and health research in developing countries. The document provides statistical data on global spending on R&D for health, looks at trends and patterns of morbidity and mortality and discusses health research challenges and priorities for the public sector

Successful communication : a toolkit for researchers and civil society organisations

HOVLAND, Ingie
October 2005

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From the introduction: "This toolkit is for researchers and practitioners who wish to communicate to policymakers. The tools are therefore specifically geared towards the needs of researchers and practitioners in civil society organisations (CSOs), including development NGOs, research institutes, think tanks, universities and networks. The toolkit addresses the questions of how researchers and CSOs can best communicate evidence in order to inform or influence policy, to achieve their own stated development objectives, or simply to make their own knowledge accessible and understandable to a wider audience." After a brief but useful introduction, tools are presented in four sections: planning, packaging, targeting and monitoring

Participatory vulnerability analysis : a step-by-step guide for field staff

CHIWAKA, Ethelet
Yates, Roger
2005

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This guide is to assist field workers and communities to analyse people's vulnerability. The guide is divided into three major parts: part 1 provides insights into key aspects of vulnerability, as different people often have different levels of understanding about it; part 2 contains suggestions of how best to prepare for a PVA, how to conduct the analysis and how to generate action; part 3 is an appendix providing suggestions for compiling the data generated through PVA, ideas for advocacy work and an example terms of reference

Tools for policy impact : a handbook for researchers

START, Daniel
HOVLAND, Ingie
October 2004

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"This handbook presents work in progress on tools for policy impact, specifically geared towards the needs of researchers. "The handbook is particularly targeted at civil society organisations, or the parts of them, whose activities involve gathering evidence, doing research, learning lessons or advising on strategy for social, environmental and economic development in the North and South"

Researching across cultures : issues of ethics and power [whole issue]

MARSHALL, Anne
BATTEN, Suzanne
September 2004

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Cultural diversity manifests in all relationships, including research relationships. Academic investigators work across a broad range of cultures that goes beyond ethnicity. What implications are most important for academic researchers to consider when designing and implementing a project? A review of relevant literature suggests that ethical implications begin with the power aspects in the research relationship. Consent, research processes, research design, data ownership, and uses of data are also salient issues that arise. [Authors' abstract]

Human subject regulations decision charts

OFFICE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTIONS (OHRP)
September 2004

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These graphic aids are a guide to help decide if a research activity involving human subjects needs to be reviewed by an institutional review board (IRB) under the requirements of the US Department of Health and Human Services. The charts specify the following: whether an activity is research that must be reviewed by an IRB, whether the review may be performed by expedited procedures, and whether informed consent or its documentation may be waived. This document is useful for institutional review boards (IRBs), investigators, and others who are conducting research with human subjects

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

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This report, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

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This site contains up-to-date information on progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap in health research. It includes reports from 1999, 2000, 2001/2002 and 2003/2004. The most recent, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

Enhancing research uptake through communication, networking and capacity development

DUNN, Alison
2004

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This brief paper describes the research methodology employed by the Malaria Knowledge Programme, and key lessons learned. The programme aimed to enhance the impact of its work through strengthening information and communication flows, involving Southern researchers and institutions and creating international networks for the improvement of research communication throughout its work. Using examples, this paper illustrates how the programme engaged with dynamics of research, policy making and practice, in accordance with DFID recommendations

How to investigate the use of medicines by consumers

HARDON, Anita
HODGKIN, Catherine
FRESLE, Daphne
2004

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This manual is a practical guide to the use of research methods for investigating medicines use by consumers, particularly those in developing countries, in order to identify problems, design interventions and measure changes. It will help health workers, policy-makers, administrators, researchers, educationalists, medical and pharmacy students, and many others to go beyond the individual and to the study the community as a focus. Topics covered include the reasons for studying medicine use by consumers, what influences consumer choice, and how to prioritise and analyse community medicines use problems. There are chapters on sampling and data analysis, and the manual concludes by looking at the important issue of monitoring and evaluating interventions

Integrated questionnaire for the measurement of social capital

GROOTAERT, Christiaan
et al
2004

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This paper introduces a tool, the Integrated Questionnaire for the Measurement of Social Capital, with a focus on developing countries. The tool aims to generate quantitative data on six dimensions of social capital as part of a larger household survey. These dimensions are: groups and networks, trust and solidarity, collective action and cooperation, information and communication, social cohesion and inclusion, empowerment and political action. The tool was tested in Albania and Nigeria and the lessons learned are presented

Toolkits : a practical guide to monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment

GOSLING, Louisa
EDWARDS, Mike
2003

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This field-tested toolkit has been designed to measure the extent to which programmes make a difference. The 2003 edition of Toolkits has been extended with contributions from SCF and beyond. It describes participatory methodologies, such as mapping and focus groups. It is divided into three sections: underlying principles, practical questions and tools. This new edition brings these up to date and discusses the implications of adopting a human rights approach to development and the increased emphasis on partnership. There are new chapters on impact assessment, monitoring and evaluating advocacy, as well as two new tools - one for improving planning, evaluation, and impact assessment and one for stakeholder analysis

Designing and conducting health system research projects : volume 2 data analysis and report writing

VARKEVISSER, Corlien M
PATHMANATHAM, Indra
BROWNLEE, Ann
2003

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Part I, Proposal Development and Fieldwork, contains modules 1-20, of which the first 18 will lead the course participants through all steps that the development of their proposal requires. Modules 19 and 20 guide them through the fieldwork period and preliminary data analysis. Each module contains detailed instructions for group work on the successive steps in the development of the proposal. At the end of each module, facilitators will find Trainer’s Notes, providing guidelines on how to present the modules and how to assist the groups in the writing of their research proposal. After Module 20 an annex has been added with general guidelines for the planning and management of HSR workshops, the training methodology and the supervision of fieldwork. The annex includes an example of a course schedule and guidelines for budgeting an HSR course. Furthermore, an information circular for course participants and a course evaluation form have been added. The course schedule presented applies to a full-time workshop for beginners, lasting just over two weeks. Depending on the level of the participants, the duration of the course can be shortened. The training materials can also be used in university settings, stretched out over a trimester or quarter with weekly sessions

Designing and conducting health system research projects : volume 2 data analysis and report writing

VARKEVISSER, Corlien M
PATHMANATHAM, Indra
BROWNLEE, Ann
2003

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Part II of the manual consists of 13 modules. These training modules on data analysis, report writing, and planning for implementation of recommendations. These modules can be used in a flexible way, depending on the educational level and research experience of the course participants; the type of study conducted and type(s) of data collection techniques used; and the state in which the data are at the onset of the data analysis and report writing workshop

Information for research in developing countries : information technology Friend or Foe?

ARUNACHALAM, S
2003

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The author details the need for and complexity of doing research in the developing country environment. He summarizes the technology divide, lack of visibility of research from these countries and how this gap is widening and notes various programmes to overcome the lack of access to information primarily journal articles. The author concludes with a number of suggestions for facilitating research in developing countries including the increase of standards and norms

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