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Promoting sexual and reproductive health for persons with disabilities : WHO/UNFPA guidance note

GROCE, Nora
et al
2009

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This resource addresses issues of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) programming for persons with disabilities. SRH, in particular, deserves attention because these needs have been so widely and so deeply neglected. At the same time, however, the approaches discussed here apply broadly to all aspects of health programming for persons with disabilities. This note outlines a general approach to programming and does not address specific protocols for the SRH care and treatment of persons with disabilities It is intended for SRH experts and advocates within UNFPA and WHO as well as those in other development organisations and partners

Best practices compendium for family planning and reproductive health

ADVANCE AFRICA. Best Practices Unit
October 2003

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This is a seachable database designed to present information on previously implemented programmes in an accessible format. It focuses on public health interventions and programme models rather than medical practices. It is continually updated, and each submission is reviewed by a technical advisory review board

Training manual : an introduction to promoting sexual health for men who have sex with men and gay men

NAZ FOUNDATION (INDIA) TRUST
2001

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Manual providing training modules on issues related to the sexuality and sexual health of men who have sex with men and gay men. It is intended for NGOs and CBOs in South Asia. The objective of the training is to give participants a clear understanding of a wide range of issues including those related to sexual health. It can also be used to train other NGOs and CBOs to develop services for MSM and gay men to incorporate their issues into existing services

Partnering : a new approach to sexual and reproductive health

COHEN, Sylvie
BURGER, Michèle
December 2000

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This report puts forward a gender perspective in sexual and reproductive health, and on finding constructive ways to build partnership between men and women. One way of achieving this is through a better understanding of manhood. The report provides an overview of current theoretical and operational knowledge; it proposes programme directions, suggests programme indicators, discusses programming considerations, and informs about innovative approaches used in gender-sensitive reproductive health services and in communication interventions that aim to build partnerships with men. It provides both the rationale for comprehensive and more complex strategies and illustrates recent government, NGO and private sector initiatives. It also underlines the importance of using gender tools on a continuing basis to evaluate service and communication programmes.

Participatory design and monitoring of reproductive health projects

HAWKINS, Kirstan
March 1996

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This document aims to find an effective way of designing and implementing programmes that address sexual and reproductive health needs by placing beneficiary perspectives in a central position. The document is split into two main sections. Section A provides a brief guide to designing a participatory monitoring system. Participatory monitoring as used in this document refers mainly to the inclusion of ‘primary stakeholders’ in monitoring of project activities. Moreover, there is a discussion of how impact can be measured from the users' perspectives through the use of proxy indicators. A checklist of key questions to be asked is provided as a guide to enhancing participation at the different stages of the project cycle which is followed by a brief comparison of external review monitoring versus monitoring. To illustrate the process of including client monitoring within the logical framework of a project, a case study example of the design of participatory monitoring is provided. The illustration ends with a discussion of the data collection systems that were used. Section B under the heading 'Resource materials' is divided into four sections which greatly overlap with the issues raised in Section A. The four sections cover the following areas in detail I) a detailed checklist for incorporating users' perspective in the project cycle, ii) different methods for monitoring from the users' perspective, iii) an overview of conventional family planning indicators and iv) a brief review of the literature on sexual and reproductive health. The paper briefly concludes with repeated calls for the user perspective to form the cornerstone of project design and monitoring

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