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The Functions of Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) in Low and Middle-income Countries: a Literature Review

YOUNG, Rebekah
REEVE, Mathew
GRILLS, Nathan
December 2016

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Purpose: The aim of this study was to review peer-reviewed literature on the roles and functions of Disabled Peoples’ Organisations (DPOs) in low and middle-income countries, and their outputs and outcomes for people with disabilities.

Method: Online databases were searched without date or language limiters (Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Embase and Cochrane), using a combination of two key word search strategies. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included studies underwent quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) and Downs and Black’asss criteria for quality assessment. Data for thematic analysis was then grouped under the broad themes of: participation and factors that facilitate participation; development of partnerships and connections; and self-development and self-help.

Results: There was some evidence within the included studies to suggest that DPOs can produce significant, positive outcomes for persons with disability in terms of factors such as employment rates, access to microfinance and bank loans, accessibility of housing, acquisition of orthopaedic devices, involvement in civil society, development of friendships and networks, and participation in training programmes. Although the studies under review largely did not investigate the long-term impact of the reported DPO functions and outputs, some of the short-term outputs may be considered proximal indicators of outcomes such as increased empowerment and well-being. Conclusion: The 11 studies in this review suggested that DPOs can be effective in achieving their stated aims of promoting well-being, participation and rights of people with disabilities in low and middle- income countries.
 

Inclusion in education : towards equality for students with disability

COLOGON, Kathy
2013

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All children in Australia have the right to an inclusive education. However, there are many barriers to the realisation of this right in the lived experience of children and families. Current efforts towards upholding the rights of all children are impeded by a lack of understanding of inclusive education and misappropriation of the term. Additional barriers include negative and discriminatory attitudes and practices, lack of support to facilitate inclusive education, and inadequate education and professional development for teachers and other professionals. Critical to addressing all of these barriers is recognising and disestablishing ableism in Australia.

This paper draws from recent research in addressing gaps in current understanding to provide a firm basis from which to inform research based policy development. Taking a rights-based approach, the paper focuses on developing a clear understanding of inclusive education and identifying strategies to enhance the education of all children in Australia

Guidelines to reduce stigma : guide 4|Counseling to reduce stigma

AUGUSTINE, Valsa
et al
2011

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"This guide is part of a series of four Guides to reduce stigma. The guides are for all managers, health and social workers and service staff who have to deal with stigma in leprosy and other health conditions. These Guides provide evidence-based and best-practice information from different disciplines, and recommendations for field workers on how to reduce stigma against and among affected persons and in the community...The fourth guide explains the use of counselling at a basic level in dealing with stigma. It provides an explanation on different techniques and approaches for counselling persons affected by stigma"

Adolescence and disability

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2011

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This Key list highlights essential information resources on adolescence and disability.
Adolescence is a time of great emotional and psychological change, of emerging sexuality and important life choices about employment and education. During this period of transition adolescents, especially those with disabilities, may be vulnerable in society; their rights have not been always been recognised. Disability programmes tend to focus on young children or adults, and may risk excluding adolescents, negatively affecting their opportunities to develop their abilities and to participate in community life. Factors in disabled adolescents' development and socialisation include the attitude and behaviour of parents, family members and peers, and social and community values. Issues highlighted in this Key list include rights, education, employment, sexuality and relationships

Rights in action : good practices for inclusive local governance in West Africa

PIATTA, Francesca
GUY, Michael
2010

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"Rights in Action" is a multi-stakeholder initiative using the Making it Work methodology in seven West African countries. This report analyses examples of people with disabilities actively participating in local governance and influencing decision making in West Africa. It provides a series of practical recommendations for key stakeholders on how to replicate this good practice which links with article 29 of the UNCRPD. This report would be of interest to people working with disability rights and local inclusive governance in West Africa

Rights in action : good practices for local inclusive governance in West Africa|Summary report

PIATTA, Francesca
GUY, Michael
2010

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"Rights in Action" is a multi-stakeholder initiative using the Making it Work methodology to promote practical, evidence based recommendations on how to achieve inclusive local governance in seven West African countries. This summary report presents the key findings and recommendations from the initiative. This report would be of interest to people working with disability rights and local inclusive governance in West Africa

Towards inclusive education for children with disabilities : a guideline

CALDERBANK, Daniel
Ed
2009

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"The Manual begins by identifying the problem and setting out the rationale for the focus on the education of children with disabilities. This is followed by a detailed analysis of eight aspects of the education system and the ways in which it must change to allow the full inclusion of children with disabilities. Each aspect has a critical role to play in transforming the education system...The final section summarizes the way forward, with an emphasis on a rights-based approach to providing education of good quality for children with disabilities in the region"

Children and disability in transition in CEE/CIS and the Baltic States

UNICEF INNOCENTI RESEARCH CENTRE
2005

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This report presents the status of children with disabilities in the former Soviet Union and Baltic States (i.e. CEE/CIS). It explains existing rights and education, healthcare and recreation facilities that are provided for children with disabilities. The concerns of children with disabilities and their parents are highlighted on various issues. This report would be useful for people interested in the status of children with disabilities in the former Soviet Union and Baltic States

Awareness of reproductive rights, HIV prevention and sexual exploitation among women with disabilities

NANGENDO, Florence
October 2002

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This research report identifies issues of awareness of reproductive rights and HIV prevention among women with disabilities. The report presents the respondents’ discussions about the rights that are relevant to them and also if they revealed how they are either protected or abused. The report’s recommends increased sensitisation, to parents, communities and other service providers to continue supporting disabled women in satisfying their sexual and reproductive needs as well as protecting them from HIV/AIDS

Overcoming resource barriers : the challenge of implementing inclusive education in rural areas

MILES, Susie
2000

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This paper examines inclusive education in rural areas and presents case studies highlighting potential barriers and solutions and lessons learnt. The summary of lessons learnt includes the following point: to embrace the whole school approach; to ensure specialist support is at national level; to ensure access to information for teachers; and to develop teacher training and create community involvement. This paper is useful for people interested in inclusive education in rural areas
A Symposium on Development Policy "Children with Disabilities and the Convention on the Rights of the Child"
Bonn, Germany
27-29 October 2000

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