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Better off dead? A report on maternal morbidity from the UK All Party Parliamentary Group on Population, Development and Reproductive Health

UK ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON POPULATION, DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
May 2009

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This report makes a number of recommendations for the effective reduction of maternal morbidity. The recommendations made, in summary, are: increase political will; increase resources to sexual and reproductive health and rights; encourage equitable health care; work in partnership; improve sexual and reproductive health rights legislation and policies; make governments accountable

The state of the world's children 2009

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
December 2008

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The 2009 report ..."examines critical issues in maternal and newborn health, underscoring the need to establish a comprehensive continuum of care for mothers, newborns and children. "The report outlines the latest paradigms in health programming and policies for mothers and newborns, and explores policies, programmes and partnerships aimed at improving maternal and neonatal health. Africa and Asia are a key focus for this report, which complements the previous year's issue on child survival." The report can be downloaded as a PDF or a multi-media version is also available in four languages

Progress for children : a report card on maternal mortality, number 7

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
September 2008

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This report describes global and regional progress in reducing maternal mortality and provides the latest statistics on Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 indicators for 192 countries and territories. Globally, the maternal mortality ratio declined from 430 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 400 in 2005, with significant regional disparities. The report examines differences in progress between regions and within regions and describes lifetime risk by region and country. Reductions in maternal mortality have come far too slowly, particularly in those regions where the problem is most acute (such as sub-Saharan Africa). Current progress is not sufficient to achieve the MDG target of reducing the maternal mortality ratio by three quarters between 1990 and 2015. This lack of progress has an enormous impact on children

Successful leadership : country actions for maternal, newborn and child health

PARTNERSHIP FOR MATERNAL, NEWBORN AND CHILD HEALTH
2008

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This document provides country-specific summaries of actions taken on a national level to improve maternal and child health. The summaries do not provide a comprehensive assessment of the progress made by individual countries, but demonstrate the importance of five factors: 1. Successful political leadership (Thailand) 2. Sound health policies (Indonesia and Tanzania) 3. Effective financing (Mexico) 4. Strong health systems (Nepal and Senegal) 5. Action to achieve equity (Bangladesh and Chile). Each summary covers: progress on MDGs, supportive policies and interventions, outcome, and key lesson

State of the world’s children 2008 : child survival

United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
2008

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This publication provides a wide-ranging assessment of the current state of child survival and primary health care for mothers, newborns and children. It examines lessons learned in child health during the past few decades and outlines the most important emerging precepts and strategies for reducing deaths among children under age five and for providing a continuum of care for mothers, newborns and children

UN Millennium Project 2005 : who's got the power? Transforming health systems for women and children. Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health

FREEDMAN, Lynn P
et al
2005

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This report has been produced by the Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health. It identifies technical interventions needed to address the problems of high rates of maternal mortality, continued child deaths due to preventable illnesses, unmet need for sexual and reproductive health services, and weak and fragile health systems. The report also asserts that policymakers must act now to change the fundamental societal dynamics that currently prevent those most in need from accessing quality health care

Making pregnancy safer : the critical role of the skilled attendant|a joint statement by WHO, ICM and FIGO

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO), DEPARTEMENT OF REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RESEARCH
INTERNATIONAL CONFEDERATION OF MIDWIVES (ICM)
INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS (FIGO)
2004

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This statement advocates for skilled care during pregnancy, childbirth and the immediate postnatal period. The statement defines clearly who is a skilled attendant, what skills she/he should have and how she/he should be trained and supported

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