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Costs and cost-effectiveness of training traditional birth attendants to reduce neonatal mortality in the Lufwanyama neonatal survival study (LUNESP)

SABIN, Lora L
et al
2012

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"The Lufwanyama Neonatal Survival Project ("LUNESP") was a cluster randomized, controlled trial that showed that training traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to perform interventions targeting birth asphyxia, hypothermia, and neonatal sepsis reduced all-cause neonatal mortality by 45%. This companion analysis was undertaken to analyze intervention costs and cost-effectiveness, and factors that might improve cost-effectiveness"
PLoS ONE 7(4)

The roles and influence of grandmothers and men : evidence supporting a family-focused approach to optimal infant and young child nutrition

AUBEL, Judi
2011

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"This report reviews both published and gray literature from the past 25 years that addresses intra-household roles and dynamics related to infant and young child nutrition-specifically the roles and influence of senior women, or grandmothers, and men. The report examines infant and young child nutrition and other maternal and child health interventions explicitly involving grandmothers and/or men and reports on each intervention’s effectiveness"

Priority medicines for mothers and children 2011

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2011

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This resource presents a list of priority medicines for mothers and children to help countries and partners select and make available those medicines that will have the biggest impact on reducing maternal, newborn and child morbidity and mortality
WHO/EMP/MAR/2011.1

What works? interventions for maternal and child under nutrition and survival

BHUTTA, Zulfigar
et al
January 2008

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This article "reviews interventions that affect maternal and child undernutrition and nutrition-related outcomes. These interventions included promotion of breastfeeding; strategies to promote complementary feeding, with or without provision of food supplements; micronutrient interventions; general supportive strategies to improve family and community nutrition; and reduction of disease burden (promotion of handwashing and strategies to reduce the burden of malaria in pregnancy). (The authors) showed that although strategies for breastfeeding promotion have a large effect on survival, their effect on stunting is small"
The Lancet, Vol 371, Issue 9610

Infant and young child feeding in emergencies : operational guidance for emergency relief staff and programme managers

IFE Core Group
February 2007

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This document aims to provide concise, practical (but non-technical) guidance on how to ensure appropriate infant and young child feeding in emergencies. A number of elements are also applicable in non-emergency settings. It is intended for emergency relief staff, programme managers, national governments, United Nations agencies, NGOs and donors, and it applies to all countries. It includes six sections of practical steps, references, key contacts and definitions. Members of the IFE Core Group are: UNICEF, WHO, UNHCR, WFP, IFBAN-GIFA, CARE USA, Fondation Terre des hommes and Emergency Nutrition Network. It is also available in Arabic, Bahasa Indonesian, French, Portuguese and Spanish

ICDS and nutrition in the eleventh five year plan (2007-2012)

MINISTRY OF WOMEN AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
2007

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This report gives the background to the Integrated child development services (ICDS) initiative, which takes a holistic approach to child nutrition, health and development and sees the first three years of life as crucial, before going on to explain the expansion in this 11th five-year plan in order to accelerate implementation for achieving the core objectives of the programme, especially to reduce the child malnutrition and help reduction in mortality rates. The plan seeks to address the challenges of issues such as the prevention and management of malnutrition, poor maternal and adolescent nutrition, gender discrimination, lack of nutrition and health education, and inadequate community participation in the programme

Child health dialogue|(incorporating Dialogue on diarrhoea & ARI news)

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Child Health Dialogue offers clear, practical advice on preventing and treating the main childhood illnesses. In addition to information on clinical management, the newsletter addresses issues which affect health workers' and families' abilities to care for children, such as communication skills, organisation of health centres and hospitals, health education and training. Regular features include: guidelines for diagnosis and treatment; training tips; information on rational drug use; research updates; feedback from the field. Aimed at health and community workers at district level and below, a secondary audience includes health managers, policy makers and academics.
Regional language editions are produced in collaboration with partner organisations in developing countries as follows:
(English for India) CMAI, Plot 2, A-3 Local Shopping Centre, Janakpuri, New Delhi 110 058, India. E-mail: cmaidel@gems.vsnl.net.in Website: http://www.cmai.org/htmdoc/calend.htm
(Tamil) RUHSA, CMC, PO 632 209 North Arcot Ambedkar District, Tamil Nadu, India
(Gujarati and Hindi) CHETNA, Lilavatiben Lalbhai's Bungalow, Civil Camp Road, Shahibaug, Ahmedabad 380 004, India. E-mail: chetna@adinet.ernet.in
(Bangla) CINI, PO Box 16742, Calcutta 700 027, India
(Chinese) Institute of Medical Information, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 3 Yabao Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020, China
(Spanish) AIS Bolivia, PO Box 568, La Paz, Bolivia. E-mail: aisbolol@ceibo.entelnet.bo
(Portuguese) Consultants at the Faculty of Medicine, Eduardo Mondlane University, CP 257, Maputo, Mozambique. E-mail: medico@zebra.uem.mz
Four times a year

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