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World Blind Union Guide to the Marrakesh Treaty

HELFER, Laurence
OKEDIJI, Ruth
REICHMAN, Jerome
July 2017

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The Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled (referred to as the Marrakesh Treaty or MT) is a legally binding international agreement that creates mandatory exceptions to national copyright law to protect the human rights of individuals with print disabilities. This Guide provides a comprehensive analysis of the Marrakesh Treaty, including an article-by-article analysis of key provisions, and specific legal and policy recommendations for giving effect to the provisions. The Guide views the Marrakesh Treaty as an international agreement that employs the legal doctrines and policy tools of copyright to advance human rights ends. The “Guide to the MT” provides a roadmap for a variety of audiences, including parliamentarians and policymakers, who adopt copyright legislation; judges, who may interpret the MT and its implementing legislation; and print disabled individuals and advocacy organizations, engaged in promoting and monitoring these processes.

Disability measurement and the Washington Group on Disability Statistics : NGO training agenda

WASHINGTON GROUP ON DISABILITY STATISTICS
June 2017

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Four videos are provided which are live recording of an Introductory training for Non-Government Organisations on disability measurement

Session 1 Video: Overview of Disability Measurement and the Washington Group Short Set (1h 35m)

Session 2 Video: Collecting Disability Data (1h 42m)

Session 3 Video: The Importance & Feasibility of Disaggregation by Disability Status (57m)

Session 4 Video: The WG/UNICEF Module on Child Functioning (1h 14m)

 

A new way to measure child functioning

UNICEF
WASHINGTON GROUP
May 2017

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"In recognizing the need for a set of questions that would produce internationally comparable data on children, the Washington Group formed a subgroup in 2009 that is chaired by the National Statistical Office of Italy (ISTAT). UNICEF joined the subgroup in 2011.

The first main activity of the subgroup was the development of a short set of questions to reflect current thinking on child functioning for inclusion in censuses and surveys. The new module uses the ICF-CY as the conceptual framework and relies on a functional approach to measuring disability.

The Washington Group/UNICEF Module on Child Functioning, finalized in 2016, covers children between 2 and 17 years of age and assesses functional difficulties in different domains including hearing, vision, communication/comprehension, learning, mobility and emotions. To better reflect the degree of functional difficulty, each area is assessed against a rating scale. The purpose is to identify the subpopulation of children who are at greater risk than other children of the same age or who are experiencing limited participation in an unaccommodating environment. The set of questions is intended for use in national household surveys and censuses"

The module is being translated into multiple languages. Supporting documentation, including a concept note, tabulation plan, templates for reporting, guidelines for interviewers and training materials are also available.

Directive on accessibility of the websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies : Toolkit

EUROPEAN DISABILITY FORUM
May 2017

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The European Union (EU) Directive on accessibility of the websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies was adopted on 26 October 2016. EU Member States will have until September 2018 to transpose this EU legislation into national law. This toolkit aims to provide key information about this EU legislation and advice for the transposition phase. Section 1 provides a timeline for transposition and implementation of the Directive, some key definitions, identification of key players and an explanation of the directive being a ‘minimum harmonisation’ Directive. Section 2 provides understanding of what the Directive covers, explains key provisions (scope, accessibility requirements, exemptions, enforcement, monitoring, etc.) and gives advice to DPOs (disabled people's organisations) concerning what they can do at national level to ensure the best possible implementation for persons with disabilities in their country

Disability in the EU SDGs indicators: Ensuring that no one is left behind

EUROPEAN DISABILITY FORUM (EDF)
March 2017

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The European Disability Forum (EDF) presents this position paper in response to the draft report of EUROSTAT on the European Union (EU) – Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) indicators circulated on 21st March to civil society organisations. The 2030 Agenda adopted by the United Nations in New York has 11 references to persons with disabilities and the SDGs have 19 references, including the technical ask to disaggregate data by disability.

However, EUROSTAT has overlooked persons with disabilities in its latest indicators draft. Now there is an opportunity to ensure this gap is filled and for the EU to include disability related indicators in line with the 2030 Agenda and the UN Convention on the Rights of persons with disabilities (UN CRPD).

The European Commission (EC) has a legal obligation under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) to promote, protect, and ensure the full enjoyment of human rights by persons with disabilities. The EC is also legally bound to ensure that persons with disabilities enjoy full equality under the law. EUROSTAT has also the technical capacity to measure the inclusion of persons with disabilities in its approach to the SDGs, and in this paper we outline why and how this could be done. Here are four guiding recommendations: 

  • The systematic disaggregation of data by disability
  • The insertion of the SDGs disability indicators in the EU SDGs indicators
  • The provision of leadership from the EU in the application of the obligations under the UN CRPD in the context of the SDGs 
  • The participation of persons with disabilities throughout the process

Humanitarian Hands on Tool (HHoT)

CBM
2017

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The CBM smartphone app 'Humanitarian Hands-on Tool' (HHoT) provides step-by-step guidance on how to implement an inclusive emergency response. With disability-inclusive humanitarian action broken down into individual task cards, which explain the basic 'how-to' details in simple language and images, this web-based tool and downloadable mobile app aims to become the ‘go-to’ field resource for all agencies planning humanitarian work that leaves no-one behind

DFID data disaggregation action plan - Better data for better lives

UK DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
UK AID
January 2017

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This action plan sets out the steps that the UK Department for International Development (DFID) will take to promote, provide and make use of their own development and humanitarian programme data which can be disaggregated on the basis of sex, age, disability status and geography (in the short term). It also has the objective to build the culture within DFID on disaggregated data, and to work with others to change the international development system on disaggregated data. A review is scheduled for 2020. Working with partners, influencing, capacity building and management information, research, analysis and reporting are outlined. Trailblazer country programmes with Bangladesh, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Rwanda are reported.

National Mechanisms for Reporting and Follow-up : A practical guide to effective state engagement with international human rights mechanisms

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
December 2016

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This Guide seeks to provide practical advice on the critical elements that States need to consider when establishing or strengthening their national mechanism for reporting and follow-up, and illustrates this advice with examples of State practice. It is based on the more comprehensive Study of State Engagement with International Human Rights Mechanisms (HR/PUB/16/1/Add.1), which contains more detailed information on these practices

healthsites.io website

November 2016

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The Global Healthsites Mapping Project is an initiative to create an online map of every health facility in the world and make the details of each location easily accessible. The aim of this website is the long term curation and validation of health care location data. The healthsites.io map will enable users to discover what healthcare facilities exist at any global location and the associated services and resources. Through collaborations with users, trusted partners and OpenStreepMap the location and contact details of every facility will be captured and the data made freely available under an Open Data License (ODBL). When a natural disaster or disease outbreak occurs there is a rush to establish accurate health care location data that can be used to support people on the ground. healthsites.io map aims to reduce the time wasted in establishing accurate and accessible baseline data.

 

App-cessibility - apps to make your tech more accessible for you.

OSBOURNE, Abbie
October 2016

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Three adaptive apps for mobile phones are briefly introduced. RogerVoice helps the hard of hearing to make phone calls by automatically transcribing speech. The dyslexia key can make the font easier to read and also can enable a sequential keyboard. Be My Eyes enables users to request help from volunteer readers by phone using videolinks

Evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of the ‘Care for Stroke’ intervention in India, a smartphone-enabled, carer-supported, educational intervention for management of disability following stroke

SURESHKUMAR, K
MURTHY, G V S
NATARAJAN, S
GOENKA, S
KUPER, H
February 2016

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This study aimed to identify operational issues encountered by study participants in using the ‘Care for Stroke’ intervention and to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. ‘Care for Stroke’ is a smartphone-enabled, educational intervention for management of physical disabilities following stroke. It is delivered through a web-based, smartphone enabled application (app). It includes inputs from stroke rehabilitation experts in a digitised format. Sixty stroke survivors discharged from hospital in Chennai, South India, and their caregivers participated in the study. The preliminary intervention was field-tested with 30 stroke survivors for 2 weeks. The finalised intervention was provided to a further 30 stroke survivors to be used in their homes with support from their carers for 4 weeks. Field-testing identified operational difficulties related to connectivity, video-streaming, picture clarity, quality of videos, and functionality of the application. Assessment was carried out by direct observation and short interview questionnaires. 

 

 

Digital Inclusion: a white paper

HOOGERWERF, Evert-Jan
MAVROU, Katerina
et al
2016

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This white paper will provide the reader with insight into the role technology plays for the full participation of persons with disabilities and older people in the digital society. The authors consider equal opportunities to participate in all realms of life a human right. The paper will help the reader to understand what the barriers to full digital inclusion for these groups are, how changing scenarios in society should lead to the definition of new goals and how these goals could be reached. 

This white paper looks forward and challenges the reader to identify strategies to tackle the digital divide. In the first section, it analyses trends and policy objectives as defined by the international community in 6 different areas relevant to the digital divide:

Disability and participation

Education

Employment

Health and social care

Technology

(Social) Media 

The writing of this white paper is the result of a three-year long project funded by the European Commission under the Lifelong Learning Programme. The ENTELIS project has brought together various organisations from different European countries and beyond and has resulted in the establishment of a sustainable network, supported by three European umbrella organisations: EASPD (European Association of Service Providers to Persons with Disabilities), AAATE (Association for the Advancement of Assistive Technology in Europe) and EVBB (European Association of Vocational Training Institutes). For them supporting the network means creating an opportunity for their member organisations and other interested stakeholders to actively engage with technology and technology users with disabilities in education, vocational training and person centred support services. Their common understanding is that ICT and AT can empower people with disabilities, lead to more fulfilled lives and a more inclusive society but that this can only be reached if there is effective collaboration between sectors. Their expectation is that the network will empower their member organisations in making this become reality and this document and in particular the roadmap contained in there might provide good guidance for that. 

 

AuthorAid

AUTHORAID
December 2015

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AuthorAid is a tool to help researchers in developing countries to network and further disseminate their work to a wider audience. The website contains links to find mentors/collaborators, a range of E-learning opportunities, funding opportunities for people working in developing countries, and a plethora of resources on topics ranging from how to write a grant proposal though to the publication process itself

Studies and research at Handicap International : promoting ethical data management

BRUS, Aude
September 2015

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This guide explains the importance of ethical data collection and management. Using Handicap International’s decades experience implementing projects and programmes globally, the report highlights the impact of data collection and the importance of implementing ethical approaches in a variety of situations where data is being collected. It aims to raise the awareness of Handicap International’s operational and technical staff and their partners to the ethical questions to be considered when managing data (preparation, collection, processing, analysis and sharing of information). It reaffirms the ethical principles underpinning the organisation’s actions and concludes with eight ethical recommendations that are applicable to studies and/or research in our intervention settings

Participation and quality of life outcomes among individuals with earthquake-related physical disability: A systematic review

NUNNERLEY, Joanne
DUNN, Jennifer
McPHERSON, Kathryn
et al
May 2015

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A literature review to evaluate quality of life and participation outcomes of individuals with earthquake-related physical injury. A systematic review was performed searching MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL and AMED electronic databases from 1966 to January 2014. Studies that measured quality of life or participation outcomes among individuals who acquired a physical disability as a result of an earthquake injury were included, with no limits on research design. The search yielded 961 potentially relevant articles after removal of duplicates. Of these, only 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. Seven papers were reviewed from the following 5 earthquakes: 2001 Gujarat earthquake, India; 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China (also known as the Sichuan earthquake); 2005 Kashmir earthquake, Pakistan (27); 2009 Padang earthquake, Indonesia; 2010 Port-au-Prince earthquake.

Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol.47, no.5, 2015, 385-393

10.2340/16501977-1965

Source user survey results 2015

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL SOURCE TEAM
April 2015

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Nearly 70 respondents from 34 different countries provided valuable information and feedback that has helped Handicap International to identify ways of improving Source and to better understand the impact Source has, who Source’s users are and how the information available on Source is used.

 

The results of the survey can be viewed from the link below and feel free to contact sourceassistant@hi-uk.org if you have any queries.  

 

Thank you to all those who participated in the Source user survey!

UNHCR mental health and psychosocial support for persons of concern

MEYER, Sarah
2013

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"This evaluation reports on how well the United Nations High Commission for Refugees considers and provides for the well-being and mental health of persons of concern to the agency. Through a survey of UNHCR field staff, extensive literature and policy review, and key informant interviews with MHPSS experts from academic institutions, international agencies and non-governmental organizations, this review provides insight into how UNHCR’s current activities contribute towards improved mental health and psychosocial well-being of displaced persons and how UNHCR’s current policy frameworks relate to established practices and frameworks in the MHPSS field"

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