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Rehabilitation in health systems: guide for action

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
May 2019

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There is great variation across countries regarding the rehabilitation needs of the population, characteristics of the health system and the challenges that face rehabilitation. For this reason, it is important for each country to identify their own priorities and develop a rehabilitation strategic plan. A rehabilitation strategic plan should seek to increase the accessibility, quality and outcomes of rehabilitation.

To assist countries to develop a comprehensive, coherent and beneficial strategic plan, WHO has developed Rehabilitation in health systems: guide for action. This resource leads governments through a four-phase process of (1) situation assessment; (2) strategic planning; (3) development of monitoring, evaluation and review processes; and (4) implementation of the strategic plan. This process utilizes health system strengthening practices with a focus on rehabilitation.

The Rehabilitation in health systems: guide for action provides practical help that directs governments through the four phases and twelve steps. The process can take place at national or subnational level. Typically phases 1 to 3 occur over a 12-month period, while phase 4 occurs over the period of the strategic plan, around 5 years. The four phases and accompanying guidance are outlined below

Increasing access to health workers in remote and rural areas through improved retention|Global policy recommendations

DOLEA, Carmen
et al
2010

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These guidelines aim to help national policy makers address the challenge of ensuring there are sufficient numbers of qualified health workers in remote and rural areas to be able to deliver effective health services and improve health outcomes. The guidelines outline the principles for creating national policy; evidence-based recommendations to improve the attraction, recruitment and retention of health workers to remote and rural areas; and measuring and evaluating the impact of rural retention policies

Monitoring vital events resource kit : stepping stones for strengthening vital statistics systems

HEALTH METRICS NETWORK
2007

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This resource kit is intended to aid national agencies, development partners and technical experts to strengthen the monitoring of vital events by providing easy, user-friendly access to technical documents relating to civil registration, cause of death attribution, sentinel and sample registration with verbal autopsy, and demographic surveillance. Timely and reliable information on vital events is useful for governance and a basic underpinning of public health, yet in most developing countries, monitoring of these events is limited: births and deaths go unregistered and causes of death patterns remain poorly understood. The kit is available as a CD-ROM or online

Participatory research with older people : a sourcebook

HESLOP, Mandy
March 2002

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This sourcebook takes the belief that participatory research with older people should form a key element of local and national government policy-making in areas such as health, employment and social welfare; programme planning by international aid agencies; and advocacy for and by older people. It has been produced to meet the need for a non-specialist sourcebook to help with all stages of participatory research with older people, and offers a clear overview of the whole process

Programming and evaluation for psychosocial programmes

AGER, Alastair
1999

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Resources supporting the planning and implementation of humanitarian and development assistance projects are relevant for the planning of psychosocial programmes. The principles are described in this short paper and these are addresses two questions: "What are we seeking to achieve?" and "What is the best way of going about this?". Logical framework analysis is applied to psychosocial programmes, including indicators of success. The paper shows that evaluation is best addressed at the planning stage. With commitment, imagination and foresight many of the principles outlined can be addressed in the most complex circumstances.There is a focus on social aspects, children and participation

Pocket guide to district health care in South Africa

HARRISON, David
March 1997

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This guide informs members of district health teams in South Africa about what the district health system is and how it brings about quality primary health care. It gives a definition of the term 'district health system', explains why district health care is important for South Africa, how to recognise a good health district, ingredients for a good health district, important characteristics of district based primary health care, and how people can be encouraged to become agents for change

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