Resources search

Visual health screening by schoolteachers in remote communities of Peru : implementation research.

LATORE-ARTEARRGA, Sergio
et al
September 2016

Expand view

An assessment was carried out of the adaptation and scaling-up of an intervention to improve the visual health of children by training teachers in screening in the Apurimac region, Peru. In a pilot screening programme in 2009–2010, 26 schoolteachers were trained to detect and refer visual acuity problems in schoolchildren in one district in Apurimac. To scale-up the intervention, lessons learnt from the pilot were used to design strategies for: (i) strengthening multisector partnerships; (ii) promoting the engagement and participation of teachers and (iii) increasing children’s attendance at referral eye clinics. Implementation began in February 2015 in two out of eight provinces of Apurimac, including hard-to-reach communities. An observational study of the processes and outcomes of adapting and scaling-up the intervention was made. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were made of data collected from March 2015 to January 2016 from programme documents, routine reports and structured evaluation questionnaires completed by teachers. Partnerships were expanded after sharing the results of the pilot phase. Training was completed by 355 teachers and directors in both provinces, belonging to 315 schools distributed in 24 districts. Teachers’ appraisal of the training achieved high positive scores. Outreach eye clinics and subsidies for glasses were provided for poorer families. 

 

Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Volume 94, Number 9, September 2016, 633-708

http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.15.163634

Global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. DRAFT for the 69th World Health Assembly

World Health Organisation (WHO)
May 2016

Expand view

This report was presented to Member States at the World Health Assembly in May 2016 and is to be read in conjunction with A69/38: Draft global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. Report by the Secretariat. The vision of this work and report is to "Accelerate progress towards universal health coverage and the UN Sustainable Development Goals by ensuring equitable access to health workers within strengthened health systems". Objectives are "To optimise performance, quality and impact of the health workforce through evidence-informed policies on human resources for health, contributing to healthy lives and well-being, effective universal health coverage, resilience and strengthened health systems at all levels",  "To align investment in human resources for health with the current and future needs of the population and of health systems, taking account of labour market dynamics and education policies; to address shortages and improve distribution of health workers, so as to enable maximum improvements in health outcomes, social welfare, employment creation and economic growth", "To build the capacity of institutions at sub-national, national, regional and global levels for effective public policy stewardship, leadership and governance of actions on human resources for health" and "to strengthen data on human resources for health, for monitoring and ensuring accountability for the implementation of national and regional strategies, and the global strategy".  Global milestones by 2020 and 2030, policy options of Member States, responsibilities of the WHO Secretariat and recommendations to other stakeholders and international partners are discussed for each objective.

 

Improving health at home and abroad : how overseas volunteering from the nhs benefits the uk and the world

ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON GLOBAL HEALTH
July 2013

Expand view

"This report describes how British health volunteers help to make big improvements in health in other countries whilst at the same time benefiting the UK. It argues that even more could be achieved with better organisation and support and that more people can be involved through virtual communication as well as by actually travelling abroad"

Improving health at home and abroad : how overseas volunteering from the NHS benefits the UK and the world|Executive summary

ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON GLOBAL HEALTH
July 2013

Expand view

This executive summary presents a summary of the main report which describes how British health volunteers help to make big improvements in health in other countries whilst at the same time benefiting the UK. It argues that even more could be achieved with better organisation and support and that more people can be involved through virtual communication as well as by actually travelling abroad

Factors affecting recruitment and retention of community health workers in a newborn care intervention in Bangladesh

RHAMAN, Syed Moshfiqur
et al
2010

Expand view

This is a summary of research which investigated the reasons for high rates of community health worker (CHW) attrition in Sylhet District in northeastern Bangladesh. Well-trained and highly motivated CHWs are critical for delivery of many community-based newborn care interventions. High rates of CHW attrition undermine programme effectiveness and potential for implementation at scale

Conceptual and practical foundations of gender and human resources for health

NEWMAN, Constance
October 2009

Expand view

This paper presents learning about various forms of gender discrimination and how they serve as barriers to health workforce participation, against the backdrop of the global gender and human resources for health (HRH) literature. It points to the central roles played by pregnancy discrimination in weakening women’s ties to the health workforce, and occupational segregation in limiting men’s role in the development of a robust informal HIV and AIDS care-giving workforce. The paper also offers global recommendations for future action through health workforce policy, planning, development and support

From Kampala to the districts : linking data, saving lives

DWYER, S
BALES, C
September 2009

Expand view

In this video two Ugandan nurses speak of what inspired them to take up nursing and how much they enjoy it, but also the challenges they face in terms of staff shortages and conditions. The video also highlights how the Ministry of Health and the Uganda Nurses and Midwives Council, based in Kampala, are using data to support the country's health workers and improve health care in the districts

Addressing gender inequality in human resources for health

NEWMAN, Constance
September 2009

Expand view

This brief reviews how the Capacity Project addressed gender discrimination and inequality in human resources for health (HRH) through its institutional mechanisms, approaches and tools as well as in country-level implementation. The public health workforce in developing countries is predominantly female. Addressing gender discrimination and inequality in human resources for health (HRH) policy and planning, workforce development and workplace support is essential in tackling the complex challenges of improving access to services, by positively influencing HRH recruitment, retention and productivity

Africa's health worker crisis - an interview with Dr Peter Ngatia

AFRICA MEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION (AMREF)
April 2009

Expand view

This interview with Dr Peter Ngatia, former faculty head at the Kenya Medical Training Centre, explores the critical lack of health workers of all levels throughout the continent of Africa and its implications. It also discusses programmes that have been set up to train community health workers to help provide at least minimum access to health care providers, particularly for rural communities

Migration as a form of workforce attrition : a nine-country study of pharmacists

WULIJI, Tana
CARTER, Sarah
BATES, Ian
April 2009

Expand view

"There is a lack of evidence to inform policy development on the reasons why health professionals migrate. Few studies have sought to empirically determine factors influencing the intention to migrate and none have explored the relationship between factors. This paper reports on the first international attempt to investigate the migration intentions of pharmacy students and identify migration factors and their relationships"

2009 FIP global pharmacy workforce report

WULIJI, Tana
Ed
2009

Expand view

"Without access to and appropriate use of quality medicines, health systems lose their ability to meet health care needs. The pharmacy workforce crisis threatens the ability of many countries to deliver health services, however little information or studies have been published in this area. The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) has sought to address this crisis by gathering global baseline data on pharmacy workforce and developing evidence-based background papers to serve as an advocacy tool at country, regional and global levels"

A book for midwives : care for pregnancy, birth and women's health|Un libro para parteras : atencion del embarazo, el parto y la salud de la mujer

KLEIN, Susan
MILLER, Suellen
THOMPSON, Fiona
2009

Expand view

Originally published in 1995, A Book for Midwives has been a comprehensive resource for practicing midwives and midwifery training programmes around the world. This new edition has been extensively updated and revised to reflect new WHO/UNICEF guidelines and standards for mothers and newborn children.This book covers the essentials of care before, during, and after birth, providing a variety of designs for low-cost equipment and training materials. It includes new information on helping women stay healthy during pregnancy; helping mothers have safer labors and births; preventing, managing, and treating obstetric emergencies; breastfeeding; the health needs of new babies; and involving the community in improving the health of mothers and pregnant women. It also includes new information about treatment and medications for HIV and other sexually transmitted infectons; vaccinations, medicines, and drug interactions; infection prevention; improved methods for dealing with complicated deliveries; and new and updated information on family planning

A WISN toolkit : a toolkit for implementing workload indicators of staffing need (WISN) to improve health workforce planning and management in decentralized health systems

KOLEHMAINEN-AITKEN, Riitta-Liisa
et al
2009

Expand view

WISN (Workload Indicators of Staffing Need) is a workforce planning tool to calculate the required workforce for individual health facilities, based on their workloads. This toolkit is adapted from the World Health Organization WISN Manual (1998) and has been developed and implemented in the provinces of Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) and Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB) in Indonesia It contains : * A guide to using the WISN toolkit * Documentary film * Case study on WISN implementation in NTT province * Steering Committee orientation presentation * User’s manual for developing workload indicators of staffing need (WISN) to improve health workforce planning and management * Outline of training of WISN trainers (Training of Trainers)

From Kampala to the districts : linking data, saving lives

DWYER, Sarah
BALES, Carol
2009

Expand view

This booklet presents the challenging conditions faced by nurses in Uganda and how staff shortages make it difficult to deliver health services, particularly in rural areas. It also highlights how the Ministry of Health and the Uganda Nurses and Midwives Council, based in Kampala, are using data to support the country's health workers and improve health care in the districts

Annual review of HRH situation in Asia-Pacific region 2006-2007

DING Yang
TIAN Jiang
August 2008

Expand view

"This report reviews the Human Resources for Health (HRH) status in the targeted countries by mainly focusing on health education and training, distribution and retention of health workers, community health workers. Eighteen countries have been included in the report: Bangladesh; Cambodia; China; Fiji; India; Indonesia; Lao PDR; Myanmar; Nepal; Philippines; Papua New Guinea; Samoa; Sri Lanka; Thailand; Vietnam; Australia; New Zealand and Mongolia"

Do lay health workers in primary and community health care improve maternal and child health?

FLOTTORP, Signe
August 2008

Expand view

"Lay health workers have no formal professional education, but they are usually provided with job-related training. They can be involved in either paid or voluntary care. They perform diverse functions related to health care delivery and a range of terms are used to describe them including village health workers, community volunteers and peer counsellors among others." This summary is based on a 2006 systematic review of lay health workers in primary and community health care, by Simon Lewin et al

Community health workers : what do we know about them?|The state of the evidence on programmes, activities, costs and impact on health outcomes of using community health workers

LEHMANN, Uta
SANDERS, David
January 2007

Expand view

"This review paper revisits questions regarding the feasibility and effectiveness of community health worker programmes. It was commissioned by the World Health Organization as a follow-up to the 'World health report 2006: working together for health', which identified as a research priority the feasibility of successfully engaging community health workers. This review aims to assess the presently existing evidence. It constitutes a desktop review, very broad in scope, as is evident from the title, which draws together and assesses the evidence as it can be found in the published and selected grey literature since the late 1970s"

Lay health workers in primary and community health care : a systematic review of trials

LEWIN, Simon A
et al
November 2006

Expand view

This document updates a systematic review produced in 2005 by Lewin. It focuses on on the effects of lay health worker interventions in improving maternal and child health and in addressing key high burden diseases such as tuberculosis in low and middle income countries. The study concludes that; "the use of lay health workers in health programmes shows promising benefits, compared to usual care, in promoting immunisation and breastfeeding uptake; in reducing mortality and morbidity from common childhood illnesses; and in improving TB treatment outcomes. Little evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of substituting lay health workers for health professionals or the effectiveness of alternative training strategies for lay health workers"

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates