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International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and Persons with Disabilities

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC)
October 2017

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"International humanitarian law (IHL) is a set of rules that, in times of armed conflict, seeks – for humanitarian reasons – to protect persons who are not, or are no longer directly participating in hostilities, and to restrict means and methods of warfare. IHL requires parties to armed conflicts to afford special respect and protection to persons with disabilities and helps ensure their inclusion. A number of weapons-related treaties aims to prevent certain disabilities from occurring by prohibiting the use of particular weapons and reducing the dangers they pose. They also seek to ensure that victims receive appropriate assistance"

Global assessment report on disaster risk reduction 2015

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR DISASTER RISK REDUCTION (UNISDR)
2015

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This report assesses current trends in global Disaster Risk Management (DRM) including strategies adopted by different countries and associated costs/risks. The report concludes by advising that global DRM is strengthened in a number of areas, including improvements in the global governance structure surrounding DRM, a deepening of the global knowledge about DRM techniques and practices, and the development of more robust accountability and assessment methodologies

Disability in humanitarian context : views from affected people and field organisations

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
July 2015

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This report is based on the results of a global consultation carried out in 2015 as a contribution to the World Humanitarian Summit and is intended to better identify the changes needed for a disability inclusive humanitarian response. A total of 769 responses were collected through 3 online surveys targeting persons with disabilities, disabled people's organisations (DPOs) and humanitarian actors. The results demonstrate that while most humanitarian actors pledge to target vulnerable persons in crisis time, few of them are putting in place specific mechanisms and procedures to effectively reach to, and taking into account, persons with disabilities in their programmes. Addressing these challenges is a human right imperative and has also to do with an effective implementation of principled humanitarian aid. This ambition requires changes in policies and practices within the humanitarian community as a whole

State of the world’s emergencies : a briefing for new UK parliamentarians

BOND HUMANITARIAN GROUP
BOND CONFLICT POLICY GROUP
July 2015

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“The briefing is designed to give incoming members of parliament a rapid overview of some of the world’s most fragile situations and highlight actions which key influencers can take to ensure the UK government most effectively delivers on its moral and political responsibilities. Beginning with summaries of key issues we face as agencies working in humanitarian crisis and conflict settings, the briefing then focuses on short summaries of 10 fragile situations and emergencies”

Note: the information is accurate to the middle of April 2015

The use of explosive weapons in Syria : a time bomb in the making. Analysis of weapons contamination in Syria.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
May 2015

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Details are given of the use of explosive weapons in Syria since 2011 and its effects on the population highlighted. The density of explosive weapons use (2013 - 2015) in Syria is mapped and the numbers of affected population by Syrian governorate are provided. Between December 2012 and March 2015, 77,645 incidents were recorded following conventional weapons and IEDs use in Syria. Explosive weapons represent 83.73% of recorded incidents and the distribution of type of weapons use per rural and urban areas is given. The higher risk of developing permanent impairments by people injured by explosive weapons and the long-term impact of explosive remnants of war on services and infrastructure are highlighted.

Mental health recommendations included in Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction

UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY
March 2015

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“The expert group was formed to address this challenge, bringing together UN experts to review evidence on mental well-being and disability related to disasters, share lessons learned and best practices, and develop recommendations for mainstreaming these issues in Disaster Risk Education.” This UN University report illustrates how disability and mental health should be highlighted as a priority in disaster risk reduction planning and execution. In addition, the group responsible for the report suggest that disability and mental health be integrated into any future discussions related to security and human rights. Finally, the group recommended that a United Nations working group be established to explore the ways in which policies and action effect or how these individuals can affect policy within the United Nations. 

Responding to the Syrian health crisis : the need for data and research

COUTTS, Adam
et al
March 2015

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This article assesses the impact of the war in Syrian the context of the health system and neighbouring countries and the rise in non-communicable diseases. The authors advocate that  urgent policy and research attention needs to be given to the generation of timely and high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of the humanitarian health response, the capacity of health systems within Syria, and the issue of non-communicable diseases among internally displaced people and refugees

The Lancet, Vol 3, Issue 3, PE8-E9, Mar 01, 2015

 

 

Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction 2015 - 2030

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR DISASTER RISK REDUCTION (UNISDR)
2015

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The Sendai Framework is the UN framework/action plan governing Disaster Risk Reduction for the period 2015-2030. It "is built on elements which ensure continuity with the work done by States and other stakeholders under the (Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015) HFA and introduces a number of innovations as called for during the consultations and negotiations…The Sendai Framework also articulates the following: the need for improved understanding of disaster risk in all its dimensions of exposure, vulnerability and hazard characteristics; the strengthening of disaster risk governance, including national platforms; accountability for disaster risk management; preparedness to “Build Back Better”; recognition of stakeholders and their roles; mobilization of risk-sensitive investment to avoid the creation of new risk; resilience of health infrastructure, cultural heritage and work-places; strengthening of international cooperation and global partnership, and risk-informed donor policies and programs, including financial support and loans from international financial institutions. There is also clear recognition of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and the regional platforms for disaster risk reduction as mechanisms for coherence across agendas, monitoring and periodic reviews in support of UN Governance bodies”

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, Third UN World Conference
Sendai, Japan
18 March 2015

Mobile for development : transforming global healthcare through mobile technology

THEVATHASAN, Vanessa
GRADZEWICZ, Agnes
RUETZEL, Sonja
2015

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This paper outlines the need for greater connectivity & accessibility in less developed countries. Following this, the authors present the benefits of various different ‘mHealth’ solutions, presented through case studies. The report concludes by outlining some of the constraints holding back greater ‘mHealth’ innovation, including financing and sustainability issues

Inclusion : the key to essential disaster risk management

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL (HI)
2015

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This briefing paper outlines the importance of including people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups in disaster risk management. The paper gives on overview of the basic principles of inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) before providing recommendations for practitioners, states and donors

 

Availability and diversity of training programs for responders to international disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies

JACQUET, Gabrielle A
et al
June 2014

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"Volunteers and members of relief organizations increasingly seek formal training prior to international field deployment. This paper identifies training programs for personnel responding to international disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, and provides concise information – if available- regarding the founding organization, year established, location, cost, duration of training, participants targeted, and the content of each program. An environmental scan was conducted through a combination of a peer-reviewed literature search and an open Internet search for the training programs.The authors concluded that "a variety of training programs are available for responders to disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies. These programs vary in their objectives, audiences, modules, geographical locations, eligibility and financial cost. This paper presents an overview of available programs and serves as a resource for potential responders interested in capacity-building training prior to deployment"

PLOS Currents Disasters, Edition 1

Inclusive disaster risk management : a framework and toolkit

FERRETTI, Silva
KHAMIS, Marion
2014

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This framework and toolkit have been designed to support practitioners in challenging and deepening inclusiveness in their work. They have been designed in simple language, so the resource should be easy to adapt for the use of field staff as a complement to existing manuals and operational resources on DRM. The practical framework contains the following sections:introduction, framework for inclusive DRM, levels of achievements, and assessing inclusiveness, using the framework for,  annexes and Q&A. Throughout the resource, related resources and checklists are provided and the toolbox features cartoons, tools catalogue, learning pills, case studies, poster and 4D lenses. These resources are useful for practitioners who want to develop an understanding of inclusive DRM framework and to learn how to practically assess inclusiveness in in ongoing DRM situations

An evidence review of research on health interventions in humanitarian crises

BLANCHET, Karl
et al
November 2013

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This report presents a review of the evidence base of public health interventions in humanitarian crises by assessing the quantity and quality of intervention studies, rather than measuring the actual effectiveness of the intervention itself.  It notes an increase in quality and volume of evidence on health interventions in humanitarian crises and recognises that evidence remains too limited, particularly for gender-based violence (GBV) and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). This report identifies a number of common needs across all areas, namely more evidence for the effectiveness of systems and delivery, better developed research methods, and more evidence on dispersed, urban and rural populations, on ensuring continuity of care and measuring and addressing health care needs in middle-income settings (particularly NCDs)

Note: Use links on the left hand side of the webpage to access either the full report, the executive summary, or the individual chapters arranged by health topic

Community based disaster risk management (CBDRM) guidelines

PARIPURNO, Eko
et al
2011

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This set of guidelines is designed to help Community Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) practitioners in building community resilience to disaster risk by coping with hazards and working around the issues of capacity and vulnerability. It is focused on building capacity in mobilising community collective resources in managing disaster risk instead of building their dependence on external support and assistance. The first half of the document details the importance of CBDRM, whilst the second explores the various tools at practitioners disposal (e.g. participatory research tools, facilitation methodologies and community organising strategies).

Checklist to facilitate health emergency planning for at-risk people

HUTTON, Dave
et al
2008

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The purpose of this checklist is to assist emergency managers to develop and implement plans and operational protocols to maintain the safety and health of more vulnerable people during emergencies.  Emergency planners can use the checklist to identify the key risk factors that may affect different population groups during emergencies and prioritise responses

Medbox : the aid library

MEDBOX

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Medbox is an online library aimed at improving the quality of healthcare in humanitarian action. An independent internet platform supported by international agencies and scientific institutions active in humanitarian assistance and development, this resource collates online professional guidelines, textbooks and practical documents on health action.

 

Resources are divided under the following main headings: Key resources (subheadings include Disaster Preparedness, WASH, Project Cycle Management), Clinical Guidelines, Pharmacy and Technologies, Women and Child Health, Public Health, Countries and Toolboxes

Dialogues for disaster anticipation and resilience

HUMANITARIAN FUTURES PROGRAMME (HFP)

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The 24 case studies highlight the important relationship that communication plays in the effectiveness of a community’s understanding and willingness to work together for the most effective response to disasters possible. It provides a clear understanding of the connection between the science behind national disasters and the relationship between effective communication and response efforts

  • Case Study #1: Early Warning - Early Action;
  • Case Study #2: Knowledge Timeline;
  • Case Study #3: Participatory Downscaling;
  • Case Study #4: Scenario-based risk communication;
  • Case Study #5: Competency Groups;
  • Case Study #6: Nanodialogues;
  • Case Study #7: Tools for participative climate risk communication;
  • Case Study #8: Café Scientifique;
  • Case: Study #9: Decision Support System for flood risk management;
  • Case Study #10: Blending sources of climate information;
  • Case Study #11: The Forecast Factory;
  • Cast Study #12: Weather or not?;
  • Cast Study #13: The River Basin Game;
  • Case Study #14: The Archer;
  • Cast Study #15: Two-way exchange;
  • Cast Study #16: UNISDR ‘Stop Disaster’ Game;
  • Case Study #17: Animations;
  • Case Study #18: Knowledge Bazaars;
  • Case Study 19: Participatory Scenario Planning;
  • Case Study #20: Community Radio;
  • Case Study #21: Fishbowl;
  • Case Study #22:Community Forecasting;
  • Case Study #23: Evacuation;
  • Case Study #24: Visualisation

Disasterready

CORNERSTONE ONDEMAND FOUNDATION

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Trusted by more than 80,000 humanitarians and developed in collaboration with leading aid agencies and humanitarian experts, DisasterReady.org makes cutting-edge professional development resources available to aid workers and volunteers - anywhere, anytime, at no cost. DisasterReady.org’s online learning library of more than 600 training resources is constantly expanding and covers core topics such as Humanitarianism, Program/Operations, Protection, Staff Welfare, Management and Leadership, Staff Safety & Security, and Soft Skills. DisasterReady.org is available as an open online learning portal for individuals to register on their own or for organizations looking to provide online training to employees and volunteers.​

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