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Every learner matters: Unpacking the learning crisis for children with disabilities

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2019

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This paper was developed by the World Bank in partnership with Leonard Cheshire and Inclusion International. It is an attempt to add knowledge to the current understanding of the importance of learning achievements, with a focus on children with disabilities. While the premise is that inclusive education refers to the inclusion of all children, the focus of this paper is on children with disabilities.

The aim of the paper is to:

  • Provide an evidence-based review of educational participation of children with disabilities.
  • Establish a case for focusing on learning achievements for students with disabilities.
  • Take stock of current mechanisms of measurement of learning outcomes and review their inclusivity.
  • Explore evidence of practice and systems which promote disability-inclusive learning for all. 

Four case studies are provided - from Pakistan, South Africa, Canada and UK.

Forgotten in a crisis: Addressing dementia in humanitarian response

GLOBAL ALZHEIMER'S & DEMENTIA ACTION ALLIANCE
ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE INTERNATIONAL
ALZHEIMER'S PAKISTAN
May 2019

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Every 3 seconds someone develops dementia and it’s one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite being some of the most at-risk in times of natural disaster, conflict and forced migration, there is a lack of awareness that dementia is a medical condition, meaning people with dementia are being neglected when they’re most in need of support.

This report investigates ways humanitarian emergency responses can protect and support people living with dementia. It draws on the experiences of people affected by dementia, Alzheimer’s specialists in affected countries, humanitarian organisations and inter-governmental organisations including the World Health Organisation and UNHCR.

Our findings reflect a wider issue of a lack of support for older people and those with disabilities in humanitarian response. We have found that people with dementia are systemically overlooked, due to a lack of global awareness of the condition and associated stigma.

The report is a collaboration between the Global Alzheimer’s & Dementia Action Alliance, Alzheimer’s Disease International and Alzheimer’s Pakistan.

Making it count: The power of youth advocates in the disability movement

WILM, Suzanne
LEONARD CHESHIRE
HANKS, Phil
May 2019

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The 2030 and Counting pilot project sought to give youth with disabilities a seat at the table on the SDGs – providing them with the tools and confidence they need to become their own agents of change. This report provides an overview of the project, together with learnings and recommendations for the future.

In its pilot year, 2030 and Counting brought together young women and men with disabilities and DPOs from Kenya, the Philippines and Zambia to report on and advocate for their rights through the framework of the SDGs

The project had three consecutive phases: Training, Story gathering (data collection) and Influencing. 

In total, 332 reports were collected between June and September 2018. The highest number of reports were submitted under the theme of Education (44%), followed by Work (33%), and Health (14%). The category of Other, which almost entirely focused on discrimination in daily life, accounted for 8%. 80% of reporters had smartphones, offering the potential to increase the use of this feature in future.
 

Guidance on strengthening disability inclusion in Humanitarian Response Plans

PERRY, Stephen
LANGE, Kirstin
MITRA, Gopal
WOOD, Gavin
April 2019

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This guidance provides support to seven UN entities on how to strengthen inclusion of disability in Humanitarian Response Plans (HRPs) as part of the UK Department for International Development (DFID) Humanitarian Investment Program. The aim of this work is to make humanitarian programming more responsive to the needs of people with disabilities affected by crisis. Humanitarian Response Plans are the product of a strategic planning process that is informed by humanitarian needs assessment activities. Therefore, this guidance focuses primarily on the steps in the humanitarian program cycle (HPC) leading to the HRP, including the process of developing the Humanitarian Needs Overview (HNO). This guidance has been aligned to the 2019 revision of this process

“On the Margins” Education for children with disabilities in Kazakhstan

RITMANN, Mira
March 2019

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Thisd report presents findings of research into report into progress towards inclusive education for disabled children in Kazakhstan and also presents recommendations for future progress.

Field research for this report was carried out between September 2017 and December 2018. The report is based on over 150 interviews with children and young adults with disabilities, their families, and disability rights activists, in multiple cities in Kazakhstan: Almaty, Astana, Kostanay, Kyzylorda, Shymkent, and Taldikorgan. Human Rights Watch researchers visited one PMPK office, five inclusive schools, and four special schools in Almaty and one inclusive school in Kyzylorda. Human Rights Watch also visited three neurological-psychiatric institutions for children in Almaty, Karaganda, and Shymkent. Human Rights Watch met and corresponded with officials from the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection and exchanged letters with the Ministries of Education and Health, and with the Almaty City Administration.

Towards independent living: Collecting examples from Europe

ANGELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
March 2019

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This Collection is a joint initiative of the European Network on Independent Living (ENIL) and the European Disability Forum (EDF). It features examples from different EU Member States, which to a different extent facilitate the right to live independently in the community.

The examples are divided into four areas, presented in different chapters:

  • Legislation and funding: State Funded Peer-Counselling – Estonia; Direct Payments – Ireland.
  • Community-based support: Peer-Counselling for women with disabilities – Austria; Supported living for adults with intellectual disabilities – Croatia; Supported Decision-Making – The Czech Republic; Mobile Mental Health Units – Greece; Personal Assistance for People with Complex Disabilities – Sweden .
  • Involvement of disabled people: Co-Production in Social Care – United Kingdom; Participation of Organisations of People with Disabilities – Italy
  • Self-advocacy: Self-Advocacy of Disabled People – Romania

 

Global survey of inclusive early childhood development and early childhood intervention programs

VARGAS-BARON, Emily
et al
March 2019

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To learn more about the current status of IECD (inclusive early childhood development) and ECI (early childhood intervention) programs, three international organizations collaborated to conduct a global survey: RISE Institute; UNICEF; and the Early Childhood Development Task Force (ECDtf), which is within the Global Partnership on Children with Disabilities (GPcwd). This large survey was designed in 2016, was conducted in 2017, and the report was prepared in 2018.

 

The main objectives of the survey were to:

  • Map current implementation of IECD and ECI programs and related activities;
  • Describe key IECD and ECI program features;
  • Identify gaps and challenges in providing accessible IECD and ECI services;
  • Document factors associated with successful implementation and scale-up;
  • Generate recommendations to inform future policy and program development and national planning and implementation efforts.

 

The online survey targeted a range of programs, and activities including IECD and ECI services; rehabilitation and habilitation services; humanitarian, emergency, and child Global Survey of Inclusive ECD and ECI Programs 8 protection services; advocacy campaigns; and research and evaluation projects. 

 

Program respondents provided information on 426 programs that were implemented in 121 countries. 

Leaving no-one behind: Building inclusive social protection systems for persons with disabilities

KIDD, Stephen
et al
February 2019

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How to make social protection systems and schemes more inclusive of persons with disabilities is examined. Social protection can play a key role in empowering persons with disabilities by addressing the additional costs they face, yet the majority of persons with disabilities are currently excluded from schemes.

The report identifies a wide range of barriers persons with disabilities experience in accessing social protection to be overcome. It calls for better data on disability, disability-specific and old age pension schemes and expanded coverage; adapting communications about social protection schemes; and improving disability assessment mechanisms. The research underpinning the report comprised involved a review of the literature, an analysis of household survey datasets, and consultations with key stakeholders and persons with disabilities in seven low- and middle-income countries: Brazil, India, Kenya, Mauritius, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia.

Topics covered include:

  • Types of social protection schemes for persons with disabilities
  • Levels of investment in social protection for persons with disabilities
  • Coverage of persons with disabilities by social protection
  • Impacts of social protection on persons with disabilities
  • Barriers to accessing social protection and measures to address them
  • Links between social protection schemes and other public services

Reimagining the workplace: disability and inclusive employment

LEONARD CHESHIRE
February 2019

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This UK based report examines the challenges and barriers facing disabled people throughout their working journey, as well as considering solutions to some of the key issues. Through our own research survey and interviews we look at the impact on disabled people where they cannot access adequate support as well as what works in improving their employment prospects

 

Topics discussed include: conditions of employment; preparing for work; falling out of work; and the performance of government based programmes.

 

ComRes interviewed in 2018 online 1,647 disabled adults in the UK, aged between 18 and 65, and in 2017 they interviewed 1,609 disabled adults. ComRes interviewed 503 UK line managers responsible for or involved in the recruitment process in 2018 and in 2017.  Between 1 December 2018 – 20 January 2019, Leonard Cheshire conducted in-depth telephone interviews with seven disabled people of working age about their experiences of employment. 

 

Recommendations are made throughout.

Leaving no-one behind: Building inclusive social protection systems for persons with disabilities

KIDD, Stephen
et al
February 2019

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This report identifies a wide range of barriers persons with disabilities experience in accessing social protection to be overcome. It calls for better data on disability, disability-specific and old age pension schemes and expanded coverage; adapting communications about social protection schemes; and improving disability assessment mechanisms. The project involved a review of the literature, an analysis of household survey datasets, and consultations with key stakeholders and persons with disabilities in seven low- and middle-income countries: Brazil, India, Kenya, Mauritius, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia.

Zero Project Report 2019: Independent living and political participation

FEMBEK, Michael
January 2019

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The Zero Project Report 2019 focuses on Article 19 (Living independently and being included in the community) and Article 29 (Participation in political and public life) of the UN CPRD, as well as related topics such as Article 12 (Equal recognition before the law) and Article 13 (Access to justice)

For 2019 the Zero Project selected 66 Innovative Practices and 10 Innovative Policies from 41 countries that positively impact the rights of persons with disabilities in their ability to live more independently and to take part in political life

 

This Report is composed of five main sections, summarizing the annual research, followed by an Annex:

• Executive Summary, including background information on this year’s research topic and the Zero Project methodology

• Innovative Polices and Practices: Fact Sheets and Life Stories

• Description of the Zero Project–Impact Transfer programme

• Description of EU-grant-funded TOPHOUSE projects

• A summary of this Report in easy language

• An Annex listing all Zero Project network members active in 2018–2019

The Zero Project Report is also available on the Zero Project Website in an accessible pdf format.

 

Provision of wheelchairs in Tajikistan: Economic assessment of alternative options

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO). REGIONAL OFFICE FOR EUROPE
2019

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"This publication presents the results of a study on the economic aspects of various models for the provision of wheelchairs in Tajikistan. The study was conducted under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, Republic of Tajikistan and with technical support from the WHO Country Office, Tajikistan. The study was finalized in consultation with Tajik users of wheelchairs, the Ministry of Health and Social Protection and international experts on wheelchair production and provision, and made use of national and international evidence on the provision of wheelchairs to inform the analysis and develop evidence-based policy options. While the study focuses on the Tajik context and its aspirations to expand in-country production of wheelchairs, its approach and findings will also be of interest to other countries in a similar situation and to other interested stakeholders"

 

 

Assistive technology in Tajikistan: Situational analysis

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO). REGIONAL OFFICE FOR EUROPE
2019

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"This publication summarizes the current gaps, needs and opportunities for intervention in the field of assistive technology in Tajikistan. The situational analysis was conducted under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, Republic of Tajikistan and with technical support from the WHO Country Office, Tajikistan. It was undertaken in collaboration with different Government ministries and State agencies, development partners, United Nations agencies, nongovernmental organizations, disabled people’s organizations and users of assistive products. It adopted a realist synthesis approach, responsive to the unique social, cultural, economic and political circumstances in the country. The evaluation focuses on assistive technology policy and governance, service provision and the impact of assistive technology on the health and well-being of individual users and their families, with the aim of improving access to high-quality, affordable assistive products in Tajikistan.

 

200 persons with disabilities participated in a survey designed to collect information on self-reported need for assistive products, user experiences and barriers to access. An additional 11 focus groups made up of persons with disabilities and older adults held indepth discussions on assistive technology. The major providers of assistive technology (Government facilities, nongovernmental organizations, local producers) were also interviewed as part of the research"

Older people’s perceptions of health and wellbeing in rapidly ageing low- and middle-income countries

ALBONE, Rachel
2019

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This report presents the findings of an analysis of data collected by HelpAge International and its network members using HelpAge’s Health Outcomes Tool. The tool is designed to collect data to better understand health and care in older age, and to measure the impact of HelpAge’s health and care programmes. It was developed in response to the challenges posed by the lack of data on older people’s health and care, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, and the resulting lack of understanding about how best to provide age, gender and disability sensitive services for older women and men. The tool was used between 2014 and 2017 in nine low- and middle-income countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America,1 and gathered data from over 3,000 older people. The findings are presented here in the context of the current debate and evidence on older people’s right to health.

This report explores three different areas in relation to ageing and health: older people’s access to health services; availability of care and support; and the impact both health, and care and support services have on older people’s health status, functional ability and wellbeing.

 

 

 

European Disability Forum, European human rights report - issue 3, 2019. Human rights

ULDRY, Marine
2019

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This is the third issue of European Disability Forum's annual European Human Rights report Series focus on Ensuring the rights of persons with disabilities to equality and non-discrimination in the European Union. The report includes a review of equality frameworks in each EU Member State and a section on multiple and intersectional forms of discrimination. The report aims to inform organisations of persons with disabilities and policymakers of the current state of protection against discrimination based on disability in the European Union and draws recommendations with the goal of reaching inclusive equality for all persons with disabilities. The first chapter provides background information about the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Chapter 2 describes what constitutes discrimination on the grounds of disability and the obligations of States under international human rights law. Chapter 3 focuses on multiple and intersectional discrimination, by examining the effect of the intersection of disability with other grounds of discrimination. Looking at current practice, Chapter 4 describes the state of play at national level, with Chapter 5 looking at the EU level, specifically considering the current gaps in ensuring better protection against discrimination based on disability. Finally, the report draws conclusions and recommendations addressed to the EU and its Member States.  

Disability and unpaid care work

CBM AUSTRALIA
2019

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This report looks at the impact of unpaid care work on disability inclusive programming and shares some practical ideas for how to address this based on experiences of CBM partners and other agencies. 

 

Programme experience discussed include:

  • Building agency and relationships: a community mobilisation approach in Jharkhand, India
  • Engaging men as care advocates in the Phillipines
  • Recognising and supporting care givers in Ghana
  • Good practice

 

Insights from ASEAN hometown improvement project: Towards improved practice

Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD)
2019

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The ASEAN Hometown Improvement Project, aimed to tackle challenges emerging from urbanization and the rise of the ageing population in the ASEAN region by attempting timely and relevant improvements to disability inclusive ‘hometowns’. 

 

Three approaches were utilized:

1) Promotion of an inclusive business through capacity building of persons with disabilities

2) Promotion of accessibility features in the community and other public places, as well as to information, communication, and transportation

3) Promotion of cooperation with government sector via discussions to find solutions to improve the livelihood of persons with disabilities

 

The sections, arranged per country in alphabetical order, contain the following: Hometown Improvement Project description and backgrounder; Capacity Building Workshop details; Key Partners and Stakeholders; Training Results; Challenges; Framework for Good Practice; and Way Forward and include:

  • Cambodia: Phnom Penh Center for Independent Living's Bakery by Persons with Disabilities
  • Indonesia: Batik Design and Marketing Management at Kampung Peduli
  • Malaysia: Branding and Marketing Management for Bakery and Handicraft by Persons with Disabilities at CBR Semenyih
  • Myanmar: Mushroom Production by Persons with Disabilities with Shwe Minn Tha Foundation
  • Phillipines: Sustainable Inclusive Urban Micro-Gardening and Community-Based Cooperative at Barangay 177
  • Thailand: Earthworm Casting and Cactus Farming at Farm D
  • Vietnam: Fermented Dry Bamboo Waste Fertilizer at Bamboo Dana Co. Ltd

 

 

Realising children's right to social protection in Middle East and North Africa. A compendium of UNICEF's contribution's

ARCHIBALD, Edward
January 2019

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This Compendium documents the broad range of UNICEF’s social protection interventions in MENA from 2014-2017. 
 

The Compendium includes 20 case studies detailing UNICEF’s contributions in the MENA region across the following five Action Areas

 

  • Evidence and Advocacy (Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Yemen, Morocco)
  • Policies, coordinating and financing (Djibouti, Morocco)
  • Cash transfer programming and systems strengthening (Egypt, Jordan, Tunisia)
  • Cash plus interventions and social work (Iraq, State of Palestine (highlights children with disabilities), Yemen)
  • Social protection in fragile and humanitarian contexts/settings (Yemen, Lebanon, Jordan, Syria). The Syrian programme was "Reaching children with complex disabilities through cash transfers and case management"

 

 

 

DRPI Manual: Roadmap to Work. A model for persons with disabilities

RIOUX, Marcia
et al
January 2019

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DRPI AWARE (Disability Rights Promotion International Asian Workplace Approach that Respects Equality): Roadmap to Work is aimed at individuals and organizations committed to the employment rights of persons with disabilities. DRPI AWARE is a collaborative six year project promoting access to opportunities in the labour force for people with disabilities. With an evidence-based understanding of the reasons for the under-employment, unemployment, and precarious employment, DRPI AWARE works with employers to increase job opportunities for people with disabilities in Dhaka (Bangladesh), Kathmandu (Nepal) and Hyderabad (India). The DRPI AWARE project team is sharing this model because it has been tested and used in India, Nepal, and Bangladesh with significant success. It represents a new way forward for realizing the employment rights of people with disabilities and ensuring jobs for people with disabilities. The model can be used as a guide by others who are designing new, or revamping existing, employment projects, strategies, schemes, programs, and inclusive employment practices. This manual provides lessons learned and the outcomes of the DRPI AWARE project and proposes a model for building an inclusive employment ecosystem. It calls for a new way of thinking about disability and of how to ensure a larbour market that equally welcomes all, including those with disabilities.

Innovate for Inclusion. Four cases of application of the social innovation lab methodology to enhance disability inclusion in mainstream settings

MAARSKE, Anneke
NEDERVEEN, Matthijs
BAART, Judith
2019

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This publication reflects back on four co-design processes undertaken by Light for the World’s Disability Inclusion Lab during the past few years. These different journeys in solution development have demonstrated the power of this methodology to create genuine inclusion in livelihood programming while striving to empower persons with disabilities to achieve economic success. In this publication the social innovation lab methodology is described as a unique approach to inclusive programming, highlighting four cases: The Livelihood Improvement Challenge in Uganda, the lab in the EmployAble programme in Ethiopia, the AgriLab in Cambodia, and the InBusiness pilot in Kenya. Lessons learnt are described.

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