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High-Level Political Forum 2017

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
2017

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The theme for HLPF 2017 (High-Level Political Forum on sustainable development), 10-19 July 2017, is "Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world". The set of goals to be reviewed in depth will be goals 1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 14 and 17.

Key documents for HLPF 2017

Policy Briefs: HLPF 2017  
Global Report on the participation of organisations of persons with disabilities (DPOs) in VNR Processes 
Accessible Information Communication Technology and Assistive Technologies and Persons with Disabilities 
HLPF 2017: Submission Paper by the Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilitie

Who is being left behind in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America? 3 reports from ODI

LYNCH, Alainna
BERLINER, Tom
MAROTTI, Chiara
BHAKTAL Tanvi
RODRIGUEZ TAKEUCHI Laura
et al
February 2016

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The commitment to ‘leave no one behind’ has been a key feature of all the discussions on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here are three papers setting out the first step to implementing this agenda - the step of identifying marginalised communities. The focus is on two case study countries for each of the three regions, sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the papers identify gaps in achieving a number of outcomes relating to key SDGs targets for marginalised groups. The paper on Asia highlights people with disabilities in Bangladesh.

Unless we act now : the impact of climate change on children

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)
November 2015

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This UNICEF report explores how climate change and related crises impact children. The report begins by outlining major climate related risks, how they may impact children, and how repetitive crises can have an increased impact on children and families. Secondly, the report shows how different mitigating actions might impact children and families. Finally the report presents a number of broad policy recommendations to reduce global warming, decrease children’s exposure and increase their resilience to climate change and environmental risks

Transforming our world : the 2030 agenda for sustainable development

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
October 2015

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This document presents the finalised text for adoption of the UN’s 2015-2030 Sustainable Development agenda, a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity.  The Agenda seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom and recognises that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. It calls for countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, to implement this plan and  pledges that no one will be left behind. It seeks to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve, and it is anticipated that the Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet

 

The document provides an introduction and vision, shared principles and commitments, the world today and the new agenda, the means of implementation, the follow up and review, and a call for action to change our world. It then specifically outlines the new agenda of 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) and the associated 169 developmental targets, the means of implementation and global partnership, and the expected follow-up and review over the next 15 years at national, regional and global levels

 

The 17 SDGs include: 

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Leave no one behind : the real bottom billion

BHATKAL, Tanvi
SAMMAN, Emma
STUART, Elizabeth
September 2015

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"This paper sets out why the ‘leave no one behind’ agenda should be a key priority (i) in implementing the SDGs in all countries and (ii) in assessing whether or not governments have met them. It underlines how deeply entrenched marginalisation is, how vulnerabilities often overlap to amplify multiple disadvantages, and just how little we know about some groups that are likely to be deprived"

Inter-agency and expert group on the sustainable development goal Indicators : tentative timeline, work plan and organization of work

INTER-AGENCY AND EXPERT GROUP ON THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL INDICATORS
July 2015

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A brief guide on the prospective Sustainable Development Agenda from the Inter-Agency and Expert Group, giving a tentative outline as to the timescale that will be followed in the deliberation and creation of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators. This guide begins with a table overview of this timescale and is then followed by a description on how the work within the group is to be aggregated and organised

Outcome document of the third international conference on financing for development : Addis Ababa action agenda

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
July 2015

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This draft resolution following the Third International Conference on Financing for Development sets out the outline of the draft resolution on the financing of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. This document outlines the Members’ commitments to the general principles of gender equality, inclusive economic growth, and the protection of the environment

A/CONF.227/L.1

The Third International Conference on Financing for Development,

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

13 - 16 July 2015

Beyond 2015 : shaping the future of equality, human rights and social justice

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY FORUM
EDF RESEARCH NETWORK
June 2015

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This publication is a collection of essays from Equality and Diversity Forum and EDF Research Network Beyond 2015 project. It presents a collection of articles about three main concepts: equality, human rights and social justice in the United Kingdom. The collection principally serves to describe levers for change and scenarios where equality and human rights could be promoted

A multifaceted program causes lasting progress for the very poor : evidence from six countries

BANERJEE, Abhijeet
et al
May 2015

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This article presents results from six randomized control trials of an integrated approach to improve livelihoods among the very poor. The graduated approach combines the transfer of a productive asset with consumption support, training, and coaching plus savings encouragement and health education and/or services. Results from the implementation of the same basic program, adapted to a wide variety of geographic and institutional contexts and with multiple implementing partners, show statistically significant cost-effective impacts on consumption (fueled mostly by increases in self-employment income) and psychosocial status of the targeted households. The impact on the poor households lasted at least a year after all implementation ended. It is possible to make sustainable improvements in the economic status of the poor with a relatively short-term intervention

Science, Vol 348, Issue 6236

Impact evaluation : a guide for commissioners and managers

STERN, Elliot
May 2015

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A guide on the processes involved in implementing and designing instruments to measure the impact evaluation of development projects for commissioners and managers. This guide takes a multifaceted approach, considers the perspective of all possible stakeholders, and highlights best practice

Discussion papers on the theme of the high-level political forum on sustainable development, submitted by major groups and other stakeholders

UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL
May 2015

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A compendium of papers from various stakeholders setting out “established and maintained effective coordination mechanisms” for the high-level discussions on sustainable development and the post-2015 development agenda

High-level political forum on sustainable development, Convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council, 26 June-8 July 2015

E/HLPF/2015/2

Millennium development goals (MDGs)

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
May 2015

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This factsheet presents a  progress report on the UN’s Millennium Development Goals relating directly to health, highlighting key statistics, progress and areas for further improvement

Fact sheet N° 290

The checklist on law and disaster risk reduction : pilot version

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP)
INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED SCRESCENT SOCIETIES
March 2015

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This “checklist provides a prioritized and succinct list of ten key questions that lawmakers, implementing officials, and those supporting them need to consider in order to ensure that their laws provide the best support for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). It covers not only dedicated Disaster Risk Management (DRM) laws but also other sectoral laws and regulations that are critical for building safety and resilience, as well as the environment, land and natural resource management” 

Patterns of progress on the MDGs and implications for target setting post-2015

SAMMAN, Emma
TAKEUCHI, Laura Rodriguez
STEER, Liesbet
March 2015

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This paper presents the progress of the millennium development goals and the post-2015 agenda. It explores seven indicators, one representing each of the first seven MDGs and highlights the causes behind the different rates of country progress. The paper argues that there is a need to find a middle ground: to maintain the power of a unified set of goals while bringing in greater sensitivity to national realities. This focus would help bridge the gap between expectations and achievements in the sustainable development goals
Research report 01

Inclusive disaster risk management : governments, communities and groups acting together

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
March 2015

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This Issue Brief, presented in advance of the United Nations (UN) Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, outlines the UN position on the importance of developing more inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) strategies. After initially outlining the importance of inclusivity, the paper goes on the present a number of key ways forward, including greater capacity development, greater understanding of risk, and the creation of innovative partnerships and institutional relationships

UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

14-18 March 2015

Sendai, Japan

Climate change’s role in disaster risk reduction’s future : beyond vulnerability and resilience

KELMAN, Ilan
GAILLARD, JC
MERCER, Jessica
March 2015

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‘This article uses vulnerability and resilience to explore the intersections and overlaps amongst climate change, disaster risk reduction, and sustainability. Critiquing concepts such as “return to normal” and “double exposure” demonstrate how separating climate change from wider contexts is counterproductive. Climate change is one contributor to disaster risk and one creeping environmental change amongst many, and not necessarily the most prominent or fundamental contributor. Yet climate change has become politically important, yielding an opportunity to highlight and tackle the deep-rooted vulnerability processes that cause “multiple exposure” to multiple threats. To enhance resilience processes that deal with the challenges, a prudent place for climate change would be as a subset within disaster risk reduction. Climate change adaptation therefore becomes one of many processes within disaster risk reduction. In turn, disaster risk reduction should sit within development and sustainability to avoid isolation from topics wider than disaster risk. Integration of the topics in this way moves beyond expressions of vulnerability and resilience towards a vision of disaster risk reduction’s future that ends tribalism and separation in order to work together to achieve common goals for humanity’

Finance for reducing disaster risk : 10 things to know

WATSON, Cherlene
et al
March 2015

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This report focuses on the basics of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) finance and the opportunities that the Post-2015 development finance landscape can offer. The resource analyses DRR spending trends and identifies a number of potential funding sources, both public and private. It concludes with a number of recommendations for future financing, particularly surrounding future international agreements on DRR

World health statistics 2015

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2015

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This report contains WHO’s annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States, and includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets

Thinking Beyond Sectors for Sustainable Development

Waage, Jeff
Yap, Chris
2015

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As we move from the era of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) it is important to consider how development agendas are set, the progress that has been made over the past 15 years, and how current debates are shaping global development efforts for the next 15.

This book was, produced as part of a University College London-London International Development Centre research collaboration entitled, Thinking Beyond Sectors for Sustainable Development. The aim of the book is to provide a concise introduction to the debates in a number of vital development sectors, review progress made in each sector, and to consider how looking beyond sectors might open new opportunities for inclusive, sustainable development.

Each chapter in this book was produced collaboratively by academics from a wide number of disciplines. As such, it represents a truly interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral effort, of the kind that will be necessary for successful development and implementation of future international development goals.

The road to dignity by 2030 : ending poverty, transforming all lives and protecting the planet : synthesis report of the Secretary-General on the post-2015 agenda

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
December 2014

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This synthesis report of the UN Secretary General was written to guide negotiations for a new global agenda centred on people and the planet, and underpinned by human rights, supporting States’ discussions going forward. The extensive document presents information in short numbered paragraphs, within six sections: 1) A universal call to action; 2) A synthesis “taking stock of the negotiations on the post-2015 agenda and reviewing lessons from pursuit of the MDGs; 3) Framing the agenda; 4) Mobilising the means to Implement our agenda; 5) Delivering our agenda; 6) Conclusion: together in a universal compact. It highlights the need to “finish the job,” both to help people now and as a launch pad for the new agenda

A/69/700

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