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Disability at a Glance 2019: Investing in accessibility in Asia and the Pacific — Strategic approaches to achieving disability-inclusive sustainable development

TATA, Srinivas
et al
December 2019

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This report lays out foundational concepts and terminologies related to disability and accessibility, and outlines the tools and approaches for successful investment in accessibility. Furthermore, it identifies drivers and added values of investment, and analyses the status of disability-inclusive development and accessibility investment across Asia and the Pacific. Finally, it provides recommendations to governments across key areas of focus to ensure that societies are built to be sustainable and inclusive.

Case studies from Australia, the Republic of Korea and India are presented.

Challenges in global Indigenous–Disability comparative research, or, why nation-state political histories matter

SOLDATIC, Karen
MELBOE, Line
KERMIT, Patrick
SOMERS, Kelly
2018

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Globally, Indigenous people, also known as First Peoples, have the poorest health outcomes of all population groups, resulting in significantly higher rates of chronic disease, ill-health, and disability. Recent research strongly suggests that Australian First Peoples and the Sami peoples of the Nordic region are positioned at opposite ends of the disability–health spectrum. Australia’s First Peoples, now experience the highest rates of disability in the nation’s recorded history, despite the significant government investment over recent decades in national Indigenous policy. Yet, Nordic Indigenous populations appear to have similar health outcomes and living conditions as the rest of the population in the region. In this paper, we compare some of the global assumptions of the two leading countries of the United Nations Human Development Index– Norway (ranked first) and Australia (ranked second)– and examine the ways in which such rankings act to hide the disparities of life trajectories and outcomes for Indigenous persons living with disability compared to the rest of the population in each country. The findings of the comparative analysis illustrate core areas for consideration when undertaking in-depth comparative research with First Nation’s peoples. This includes issues surrounding the differentiated political significance of national population data systems for local Indigenous peoples in their struggles for recognition, and the nuanced processes of population data categorisation that are developed as a result of First Nation’s localised struggles for recognition, respect and rights under processes of European colonisation.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2

An intersection in population control: welfare reform and indigenous people with a partial capacity to work in the Australian northern territory

St GUILLAUME, Louise
THILL, Cate
2018

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In Australia, in the last decade, there have been significant policy changes to income support payments for people with a disability and Indigenous people. These policy reforms intersect in the experience of Indigenous people with a partial capacity to work in the Northern Territory who are subject to compulsory income management if classified as long-term welfare payment recipients. This intersection is overlooked in existing research and government policy. In this article, we apply intersectionality and Southern disability theory as frameworks to analyse how Indigenous people with a partial capacity to work (PCW) in the Northern Territory are governed under compulsory income management. Whilst the program is theoretically race and ability neutral, in practice it targets specific categories of people because it fails to address the structural and cultural barriers experienced by Indigenous people with a disability and reinscribes disabling and colonising technologies of population control.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2

Inclusion of marginalised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with neurocognitive disability in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

TOWNSEND, Clare
McINTYRE, Michelle
LAKHANI, Ali
WRIGHT, Courtney
WHITE, Paul
BISHARA, Jason
CULLEN, Jennifer
2018

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Given the ambiguity surrounding the extent and experience of neurocognitive disability (NCD) among marginalised Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia, evidence regarding the level and nature of NCD is crucial to ensure equitable access and inclusion into the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). This paper reports the results of the implementation of The Guddi Protocol (a culturally informed and appropriate screening protocol for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples) at two locations in Queensland. Results indicated high levels of NCD, and additional qualitative data revealed a number of factors associated with the complex disablement of study participants, namely: i) intergenerational trauma; ii) a social context of disadvantage, marginalisation and exclusion; and iii) the nonidentification of disability. The results are linked to implications for NDIS inclusion for this population, and recommendations are made. Unless the extent and nature of complex disability and the issues surrounding culturally safe policy, and service design and engagement are addressed with and by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including those who experience complex disablement, marginalised people will continue to be effectively excluded from the NDIS.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2

Entering the SDG era: What do Fijians prioritise as indicators of disability-inclusive education?

SPRUNT, Beth
DEPPELER, Joanne
RAVULO, Kitione
TINAIVUNIVALU, Savaira
SHARMA, Umesh
2017

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Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 is to ‘Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all’ and the targets and indicators for SDG 4 emphasise the importance of measuring outcomes for children with disabilities (United Nations, 2015b). This paper reports on findings from qualitative research investigating Fijian stakeholders’ priorities for measuring success of efforts within a contextually and culturally meaningful process of disabilityinclusive education; that is, achievement of SDG 4 for children with disabilities. The priorities are presented in light of the specific challenges in Fiji to fulfilling this goal. The research presented in this paper is one part of a much larger mixed method study funded by the Australian aid program that aimed to develop and test indicators for the education of children with disabilities in the Pacific (Sharma et al., 2016). Fijian researchers with lived experience of disability undertook key informant interviews and focus group discussions with 28 participants. The findings include the need for or role of: an implementation plan and resourcing to ensure the national inclusive education policy is activated; improved awareness and attitudes; competent, confident and compassionate teachers; disability-specific services and assistive technology; accessible buildings and transport; and the important role of special schools. Inclusive education reform requires that Fiji incorporates and builds on existing strengths in special and inclusive education to ensure that systems and people are prepared and resourced for inclusion. The paper concludes that targets within SDG 4 are compatible with priorities within Fiji, however additional indicators are required to measure locally-prioritized changes related to barriers which need to be addressed if Fiji is to make progress towards the higher-order targets of SDG 4.

 

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2017, Vol. 4 No. 1

Enabling education review, issue 4

ENABLING EDUCATION NETWORK
December 2015

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This newsletter contains a variety of articles about inclusive education in several countries around the world. The topics focus mostly on funding, managing and sustaining inclusive education; engaging and empowering beneficiaries in finding solutions; facilitating parental and child involvement and early childhood education

Enabling Education Review, issue 4

‘Nowhere to be found’: disabled refugees and asylum seekers within the Australian resettlement landscape

SOLDATIC, Karen
SOMERS, Kelly
BUCKLEY, Amma
FLEAY, Caroline
2015

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Australia has long placed restrictions on the immigration of people with disabilities. While recent civil society mobilisation has forced some shift in policy, it is far from clear whether this will result in people with disabilities being accepted as immigrants. The issue is complicated further for people defined as ‘refugees’ and ‘asylum seekers’ who have encountered the migration restrictions on disability. As a result of this policy landscape, there is limited rigorous research that seeks to understand the social inclusion and participation of disabled refugees and asylum seekers within the resettlement process. An extensive review reveals that refugees and asylum seekers with disabilities remain largely absent from both resettlement literature and disability research. This paper summarises the limited available research in the area around the following themes: processes of offshore migration and the way that disability is assessed under Australia’s refugee legislation; the uncertainty of the prevalence of disability within refugee and asylum seeker communities; the provision of resettlement services, both mainstream and disability-specific, through the transitional period and beyond; and the invisibility of asylum seekers with disabilities in Australia’s immigration detention centres, community-based arrangements and offshore processing centres. To conclude, the paper outlines implications for further research, policy and practice in the Australian context.

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 1

Sendai statement to promote disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction for resilient, inclusive and equitable societies in Asia and the Pacific

REHABILITATION INTERNATIONAL
UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMISSION ON ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
NIPPON FOUNDATION
April 2014

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This Statement documents attendees of the Asia Pacific Meeting on Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction’s joint understanding that “Disability inclusion in disaster risk reduction is critical for the creation of resilient, inclusive and equitable societies.” The state goes on to commit attendees to push for greater participation of men, women, and children alongside policymakers in the creation of new disaster risk reduction policy. The statement focuses on the Core messages; specific action for disability inclusion in disaster risk reduction; and strategic action for disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction in order to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in the conversation regarding disaster risk reduction

Asia-Pacific Meeting on Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction: Changing Mindsets through Knowledge

22-23 April 2014

Sendai, Japan

Guidelines of disaster risk reduction : disability and disaster

GLOBAL ALLIANCE ON ACESSIBLE TECHNOLOGIES AND ENVIRONMENTS (GAATES)
ASIA DISASTER PREPAREDNESS CENTER (ADPC)
ASIA PACIFIC BROADCASTING UNION (ABU)
2014

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This report aims to raise awareness about inclusive policies, practices and disaster risk reduction strategies that address the accessibility of communication, shelter, transportation and early warning systems. The guidelines also hope to foster collaboration between disaster preparedness organizations, broadcasters and organizations of persons with disabilities to mainstreaming disability issues in disaster risk reduction strategies. These goals are achieved through discussion of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, inclusive disaster risk reduction, and concern for the inclusive nature of evacuation protocols for older people and people with disabilities, access to services, disaster risk reduction, and communication strategies

Inclusive disaster and emergency management for persons with disabilities : a review of needs, challenges, effective policies, and practices

RAJA, Deepti Samant
NARASIMHAN, Nirmita
2013

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This report provides an introduction into the needs of persons with disabilities in disasters and emergencies and reviews the challenges, effective policies and practices of inclusive disaster and emergency management.  It compiles international mandates and guidelines, strategies and practices for inclusive disaster management and gives an overview of the disaster and emergency management process and how persons with disabilities can be affected at each stage.  This report highlights the importance of information and communication technologies throughout the process and provides related case studies

Disability and disaster risk reduction : celebrating DRR day

CARE INTERNATIONAL
January 2013

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This resource is a special edition of CARE International's disaster risk reduction community of practice quarterly newsletter to celebrate global disaster risk reduction day.  It focuses on disability inclusion in disaster risk reduction programming and presents different organisations' experiences of inclusive disaster risk reduction in different regions

CI DRR CoP Newsletter, quarterly

Incheon strategy to "make the right real" for the persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific

UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ESCAP)
November 2012

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"This report presents information about 'The Incheon Strategy' which provides the Asian and Pacific region, and the world, with the first set of regionally agreed disability-inclusive development goals. Developed over more than two years of consultations with governments and civil society stakeholders, the Incheon Strategy comprises 10 goals, 27 targets and 62 indicators. The Incheon Strategy builds on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action and Biwako Plus Five towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific. The Incheon Strategy will enable the Asian and Pacific region to track progress towards improving the quality of life, and the fulfillment of the rights, of the region’s 650 million persons with disabilities, most of whom live in poverty"
ST/ESCAP/2648

Disability at a glance 2012 : strengthening the evidence base in Asia and the Pacific

UN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ESCAP), Social Development Division
October 2012

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This report series aims to provide a regional overview of disability policies and practices, as well as relevant country data and information. This fourth edition highlights the complexity of interpreting disability data and stresses the urgent need to work towards a greater common understanding of disability, related data and data collection practices. The report consists of an introduction, two analytical chapters and subregional and country snapshots. The progress in data collection efforts is reflected in the number of country snapshots included in the current edition (52 countries and areas). The data are drawn from national Government sources, based on bilateral communication between national disability focal points and ESCAP, as well as the 2011 ESCAP Disability Survey. This report is useful for policymakers, statisticians and representatives of organizations of, and for, persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific
ST/ESCAP/2642

Report of the regional stakeholder consultation for the high-level intergovernmental meeting on the final review of the implementation of the Asian and Pacific decade of disabled persons, 2003-2012 (Second Session)

UNITED NATIONS Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)
December 2011

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"This meeting report provides information from a meeting reviewing the roadmap of the 'Implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons, 2003-2012'. The report provides a review of the key issues identified by Governments and civil society as contained in the responses to surveys conducted by the secretariat on the regional implementation of the Second Asian and Pacific Decade of Disabled Persons. It also presents the inputs and views of stakeholders as a basis for the preparation of the outcome document for the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting"
Regional stakeholder consultation for the high-level intergovernmental meeting on the final review of the implementation of the Asian and Pacific decade of disabled persons, 2003-2012 (Second Session)
Bangkok, Thailand
14-16 December 2011

The economic benefits of increasing the employment for people with disability

DELOITTE ACCESS ECONOMICS
August 2011

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This report estimates the increase in economic output that could be achieved by increasing employment outcomes for people with disabilities…The economic modelling presented in this report suggests that closing the gap between labour market participation rates and unemployment rates for people with and without disabilities by one-third would result in a cumulative $43 billion increase in Australia’s GDP over the next decade in real dollar terms. The modelling also suggests that GDP will be around 0.85% higher over the longer term, which is equivalent to an increase in GDP in 2011 of $12 billion.

The policy and program mechanisms for achieving these outcomes are not explicitly addressed in this report, nor does it address the costs associated with achieving an increase in employment participation. Rather, the aim of this report is to present the potential benefits associated with increasing employment participation for people with disabilities and provide a reference point for future policy discussion

Individual employment agreement

PEOPLE FIRST NZ
WORKS4US
June 2011

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This easy read employment agreement explains the employment laws of New Zealand while remaining accessible for people with learning disability. It would be of interest to people interested in the employment laws in New Zealand
This report is also available in a CD Rom format

Development for all : towards a disability-inclusive Australian aid program 2009-2014|Achievement highlights : the first two years

WHH
Ed
December 2010

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This report presents the progress towards ensuring that Australian aid benefits people with disabilities. This report highlights the early achievements in making Australia’s aid program more effective through a focus on including people with disability
Note: Available in pdf and word formats online. Also available in large print, audio, and screen-reader compatible formats online at: www.ausaid.gov.au/keyaid/disability.cfm and Braille copies can be ordered online from the publisher or on +61 2 6269 1050

Disaster risk reduction through climate change adaptation : Incheon declaration, remap and action plan

NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, REPUBLIC OF KOREA
October 2010

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This conference report presents a summary of the agreements made during the fourth Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. The report contains a roadmap, agreed by the States in attendance, to establish climate resilient disaster risk management (DRM) systems that contribute to sustainable development at regional, national, sub national and community levels by 2015. This roadmap details a wide range of activities, including delivering training to key stakeholders, developing communication plans relating to disaster risk reduction, and the promotion of child- and people-centered education for community preparedness and risk reduction

The 4th Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

25-28 October 2010

Incheon, Republic of Korea

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