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“They Stay until They Die” A lifetime of isolation and neglect in institutions for people with disabilities in Brazil

RIOS-ESPINOSA, Carlos
et al
May 2018

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This report documents a range of abuses against children and adults with disabilities in residential institutions in Brazil. The research is based on direct observations during visits to 19 institutions (known in Brazil as shelters and care homes), including 8 for children, as well as 5 inclusive residences for people with disabilities. In addition, Human Rights Watch researchers interviewed 171 people, including children with disabilities and their families, adults with disabilities in institutions, disability rights advocates, representatives of non–governmental organizations, including disabled persons organizations, staff in institutions, and government officials.

 

Research was carried out between November 2016 and March 2018 in the states of São Paulo (including São Paulo and Campinas), Rio de Janeiro (including Rio de Janeiro, Duque de Caxias, Niteroi and Nova Friburgo), Bahia (Salvador) and Distrito Federal (including Brasilia and Ceilândia).

Inclusive education in the global South? A Colombian perspective: ‘When you look towards the past, you see children with disabilities, and if you look towards the future, what you see is diverse learners.’

KAMENOPOULOU, Leda
2018

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Research conducted on inclusion in education is reported focusing on the capital, Bogotá. The research foci were a) inclusive education in practice, b) teacher preparation for inclusive education, and c) local understanding of inclusive education. 

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018 Vol.5, No. 1, 1192-1214

No justice : torture, trafficking and segregation in Mexico

RODRIGUEZ, Priscila
ROSENTHAL, Eric
GUERRERO, Humberto
July 2015

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This report presents the findings of Disability Rights International (DRI)'s two-year investigation into the treatment of children and adults with mental disabilities in Mexico City which found a pattern of egregious and widespread human rights violations. The investigation found that in Mexico City having a disability can mean a life of detention and uncovered the existence of a “blacklist” of particularly abusive institutions that the Mexico City authorities are aware of – yet they permit these facilities to operate. DRI visited five of 25 facilities on the blacklist and specifically highlight the findings from Mama Rosa and Casa Esperanza, which was so abusive that DRI filed a formal complaint to DIF and sought immediate action by DIF to protect detainees. The report outlines the overall findings and how Mexico can take steps toward reform and justice calling for immediate steps to enforce the basic human rights of people with disabilities and outlines

Note: the report is available in pdf and word versions in both English and Spanish

Education through an ability studies lens

WOLBRING, Gregory
YUMAKULOV, Sophya
2015

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The purpose of this article is to engage with ability expectations evident in the education setting. The authors provide quantitative data on the ability expectation sentiment of children in the education setting from 1851-2014, using the NYT as a source and discuss the future impact of changing ability expectations including the ability expectation that humans enhance themselves beyond the species-typical for the education system (section 3). It also discusses the term learning disability (LD) through the lens of changing ability expectations (section 4) and posit sthat the ability studies framework allows for a new community of practice bringing together people and ideas from disability studies and other fields in an innovative way

Zeitschrift für Inklusion 10(2)

Guardianship for young adults with disabilities as a violation of the purpose of the individuals with disabilities education improvement act

KANTER, Arlene S
2015

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“The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) was originally enacted in 1975 as the Education for All Handicapped Children’s Act. The purpose of the IDEIA is to “provide a free appropriate public education” to children with disabilities and to prepare them for further education, employment, and full participation in society. Under the IDEIA, all students are required to have a transition plan to facilitate their movement from high school to life after school. Although the transition planning process does not require parents to become guardians for their children with disabilities, many parents throughout the United States believe that becoming their adult child’s guardian is the next step in the transition process as their child reaches the age of majority. As a legal procedure, guardianship cedes decision-making authority from the young adult child to the parent just at the time in the young person’s life when he or she should be supported to exercise decision-making authority so as to live the most independent life possible. Further, schools, parents, and courts often fail to consider less restrictive alternatives to guardianship, such as supported decision-making, for those young adults who may need help in decision-making. Supported decision making has gained international attention recently due to the adoption of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, which calls for support for people with disabilities rather than substituted decision-making, which is included in most guardianship laws. This article presents the view that guardianship as part of the transition planning process for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities undermines the language and purpose of the IDEIA.”

 

Journal of International Aging Law & Policy, Vol. 8

The efficacy of community based rehabilitation for children with or at significant risk of intellectual disabilities in low and middle income countries : a review

ROBERTSON, Janet
EMERSON, Eric
HATTON, Chris
August 2009

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"The aim of the present review is to summarise evidence regarding the efficacy of CBR in relation to one particular ‘high risk’ group of disabled children; children with intellectual disabilities (ID)...Only 10 studies were identified for inclusion in the review of research on the effectiveness of CBR for children and adolescents with ID and these are summarised in Appendix Two. An examination of reviews on the effectiveness of CBR for all people with disabilities points to two main reasons for this low level of evidence. Firstly, CBR has not been the subject of a significant amount of rigorous evaluation. Secondly, children and adolescents with ID have not been the recipients of significant amounts of CBR. We will discuss the reviews on the effectiveness of CBR generally and indicate what they say about ID before outlining the extremely small amount of information available on the effectiveness of CBR for children and adolescents with ID"
CeDR Research Report 2009:4

Categories of disability under IDEA

NATIONAL DISSEMINATION CENTER FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES (NICHCY)
April 2009

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This document provides information about the different disability categories for children with disabilities under the US federal law Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It defines the 13 disability categories and provides information about services available to families. This resource is useful to people interested in categories of disabilities under IDEA

Playgrounds for all children [Chapter 46]

WERNER, David
2009

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This chapter presents information about how to involve local people in building low-cost rehabilitation playgrounds that should be built for use by all children, both disabled and non-disabled. Examples of playgrounds and equipment are provided
Chapter 46 of "Disabled Village Children" by David Warner

Disabilities among refugees and conflict-affected populations

WOMEN'S COMMISSION FOR REFUGEE WOMEN AND CHILDREN
June 2008

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"This report is the culmination of a six-month project...to address the rights and needs of displaced persons with disabilities, with a particular focus on women (including older women), children and youth. Based on field research in five refugee situations, as well as global desk research, the Women’s Commission sought to map existing services for displaced persons with disabilities, identify gaps and good practices and make recommendations on how to improve services, protection and participation for displaced persons with disabilities"

Monitoring child disability in developing countries : results from the multiple indicator cluster surveys

UNITED NATIONS CHILDRENS FUND (UNICEF)
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
2008

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Using the ten question screen for children with disability in the multiple indicator cluster survey (MICS) in 20 countries, this report aims "to raise awareness and thereby both prevent new cases of child disability when that is possible and ensure protection and inclusion for children with disabilities. The findings presented in this publication provide decision-makers with basic information from a number of diverse countries that can be used to determine priorities related to child disability, including the prevention of childhood disabilities, the early detection of disorders leading to disability, and the timely provision of medical-rehabilitation services and comprehensive support to families with children with disabilities"

Immunization rates among disabled children in Ecuador: Unanticipated findings

GROCE, Nora
AYORA, Paolo
KAPLAN, Lawrence
August 2007

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Researchers hypothesize that impoverished parents in developing countries may forego provision of healthcare for disabled children, instead allocating scarce resources to nondisabled children or other household needs. We compared the immunization rates of 32 children with complex special heathcare needs with those of 95 nondisabled siblings in coastal Ecuador. Almost 100% (31 of 32) of the disabled children studied were immunized at a rate comparable with their nondisabled siblings. We propose that this finding is attributable to an effective national immunization program and to positive local sociocultural attitudes toward disability. These findings underscore the need for more research on disability across cultures.

Language impairment and sexual assault of girls and women : findings from a community sample

BROWNLIE, E. B
et al
2007

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"This study reports on a community sample of children with speech or language impairment, followed to age 25. Sexual assault history was assessed based on two questions from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Posttraumatic Stress Disorder module. Women with language impairment (n = 33) were more likely than women with unimpaired language (n = 59) to report sexual abuse/assault, controlled for socioeconomic status. Sexual assault was associated with higher rates of psychiatric disorders and poorer functioning. Women with neither language impairment nor a history of sexual assault had fewer psychiatric disorders and higher functioning than women with language impairment and/or a history of sexual assault"
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol 35, No 4

Twenty years of community-based rehabilitation in Guyana 1986-2006 : an impact assessment

DEEPAK, Sunil
2007

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"This impact assessment is based on a review of reports and studies from different sources related to Guyana CBR programme, and through a field visit." The report focuses upon achievements of the CBR programme over the past twenty years, with particular emphasis on the impact on the policies and practices of institutions in Guyana, the lives of children and adults with disabilities and the civil society & organisations in Guyana

Impacts of poverty on quality of life in families of children with disabilities

PARK, Jiyeon
TURNBULL, Ann P
TURNBULL, H. Rutherford
2002

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This literature review examines the impact of poverty on the quality of life in families of children with disabilities in the USA. The article examines the impact of poverty relating to the five dimensions of family, including health, productivity, physical environment, emotional well-being and family interaction. It provides suggestions for policy, research and practices. This article is useful for people interested in the impact of poverty on the quality of life in families of children with disabilities in the USA
Exceptional Children Journal, Vol 68, No 2

Sociocultural influences on disability status in Puerto Rican children

GANOTTI, Mary E
HANDWERKER, W Penn
GROCE, Nora Ellen
CRUZ, Cynthia
September 2001

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This article describes culturally defined meanings of childhood function and disability in Puerto Rico to provide a context for the interpretation of test scores from the Spanish translation of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). More than 600 Puerto Rican teachers, parents and caregivers of children with and without disabilities, and members of the general community participated in ethnographic interviews, which were designed to describe their beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge about childhood function and disability

Back to school guide for special needs families

VILLARREAL, Dawn

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This resource library provides articles for parents to enable them to explain their child's disability to teachers and resources for teachers. It also provides information about visual supports, social stories, school rules and more

Inclusive education Canada

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION CANADA

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This Canadian inclusive education website is a hub for parents, teachers, and other education professionals to discuss and share ideas on best practice on inclusive education. This website features a news section and additional information on inclusive education in the form of reports, articles and other publications. It also has a promotion section which details events and other awareness raising activities

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