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Beyond visibility: A learning Brief on Vulnerability Focal Point Approach

Humanity and Inclusion
January 2023

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This fact sheet presents the main lessons learned and the factors that helped and hindered the use of the intervention called the Vulnerability Focal Point (VFP) approach to improve access to and use of SRH services by people with disabilities.

The lessons learned from the VFP approach provide a reflection on what has worked and what has not. In addition, this note recommends ways to further improve the approach based on the experience and reflections of key stakeholders, including project beneficiaries (people with disabilities in the selected sites), VFPs, respective local government representatives, Humanity & Inclusion (HI) and its partners, and donors. The lessons learned will be crucial for making informed decisions about the continuation, scaling up, replication and sustainability of the VFP approach in the future.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Children with disabilities in the Middle East and North Africa: A statistical overview of their well-being

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
October 2022

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An estimated 21 million children with disabilities live in the Middle East and North Africa. Each of them – like every child in the world – has the right to be nurtured and supported through responsive care and education, to receive adequate nutrition and social protection, and to enjoy play and leisure time. Too often, however, such rights are denied. The reasons vary. They include stigma, lack of accessible services, institutionalization and physical barriers, but the consequences are sadly consistent. When marginalized from society, the chances for these children to survive and thrive are diminished, along with their prospects for a bright future.

Monitoring the inclusion of children with disabilities in development efforts has long been held back by the lack of reliable and comprehensive data. Recent years, however, have seen renewed efforts to fill these data gaps. The development of new data collection tools has resulted in a substantial increase in the availability and quality of data on children with disabilities, fostering new analyses and contributing to increased knowledge generation.

This report is a testament to these efforts. It includes internationally comparable data from four countries in the Middle East and North Africa and covers 18 indicators of child well-being – from nutrition, health and education to protection from violence, exploitation and discrimination. It also presents global and regional estimates of children with disabilities drawn from more than 1,000 data sources, including 95 from countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

The report’s objective is to promote the use of these data to make children with disabilities in the region more visible, bringing about a fuller understanding of their life experiences. It offers evidence crucial to decision-making to fulfill obligations, both moral and legal, to give every child an equal chance in life.

Journal for International Development: Dilemmas and Developments in Disability Inclusive Employment with a focus on low and middle income settings

Institute of Development Studies, Inclusion International and other various authors
August 2022

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This is a special edition of the Journal of International Development focusing on the dilemmas and developments in disability inclusive employment with a focus on low and middle income settings. This collection of papers provides a rich and diverse set of perspectives and insights regarding the current state of play for disability inclusive employment as a global aspiration.

Inclusive Futures: Using social behaviour change to promote disability inclusion in development programmes

Inclusive Futures
Sightsavers
August 2022

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This brief focuses on the use of social behaviour change (SBC) in the Inclusive Futures programme. It includes an introduction to social behaviour change, followed by three examples of how it is being used in our Inclusive Futures work. These examples reflect emerging findings and our approaches as we go forward. The brief is designed to:
•Explain what SBC is and what it can be useful for – particularly when addressing disability stigma and discrimination
•Present examples of how SBC can be used in different ways to support disability inclusion in development programmes

Mainstreaming disability inclusive employment in international development

Mary Wickenden
Philip Mader
Stephen Thompson
Jackie Shaw
July 2022

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People with disabilities are under-represented in the global workforce, and this problem is often particularly acute inthe‘global south’. This is an editorial to a special issue that seeks to provide new perspectives on why this is the case. We deliberately wanted to place this collection in the Journal of International Development as a core development publication, rather than in a disability specific one, because we think it is important to ‘mainstream’ disability within development so that the international community can develop an increased understanding and awareness of disability dilemmas. The challenges faced by disabled people need to be tackled as part of all development thinking and programming.

Capability-sensitive principles for assistive technology to support young graduates with disabilities in Bangladesh and Kenya into employment

MORRIS, Lisa-Dione
ALGHAIB, Ola Abu
NORTHRIDGE, James
July 2022

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Owing to increased inclusion of young people with disabilities into the private sector in Bangladesh and Kenya, there is an urgent need to find alternative ways to support young graduates with a disability in the workplace with assistive technology solutions. The aim of the paper is to identify barriers for private workplace sectors to use assistive technology to support young graduates seeking, maintaining and retaining employment. This qualitative study adopted the research onion design of Saunders et al. Data were collected usinginterviews and focus group discussions and analysed using thematic analysis. The findings reveal that barriers are linked to seven key person-centred capability themes: the dream, external factors, internal factors, assistive technology vision,strategic design priorities and gaps and assistive actions.

 

Journal of International Development, Volume 34, No. 5

Assistive Technology in two humanitarian contexts: Bangladesh and Jordan

KETT, Maria
June 2022

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Despite increased focus on the need for assistive technology (AT), along with estimates of need and gaps in provision in humanitarian contexts, very little is actually known about how people who need AT are managing in these contexts. To address this need, this study explored four main questions: 

What do we currently know about the need for AT in humanitarian contexts?
How is this need currently met?
What gaps are there in the evidence about these needs?
What mechanisms are needed to ensure provision of AT in humanitarian contexts? 

It explored these questions through individual interviews with AT users and their families, as well as people working in the sector, in two humanitarian response contexts: Bangladesh and Jordan. In Bangladesh, we partnered with CBM Global and their local partner, the Centre for Disability in Development, and in Jordan, all those interviewed were beneficiaries of HelpAge International.

The questions focused on the areas identified as gaps in the initial literature review, and used qualitative methodologies to probe and gain further insight into gaps across the entire AT ecosystem.

Early detection tools for children with developmental delays and disabilities in the Middle East and North Africa

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
June 2022

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This technical brief was developed to support specialists in countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region to select which early detection tools best fit their needs and context by comparing various tools that have been used in theregion and lessons learned in using and adapting those tools to local contexts.

Barriers to inclusive employment for self-advocates and families

BIALIK, Kimber
MHIRI, Manel
June 2022

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This article is about the barriers to inclusive employment that people with intellectual disabilities and families face in Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, and Bangladesh.

Through the Inclusion Works Project, we worked with our members in Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, and Bangladesh to talk with self-advocates and family members about employment.

We had 3 consultation meetings with self-advocates and 3 consultation meetings with families – we talked to 54 self-advocates and 45 family members about access to inclusive employment in their countries.

Some of the barriers that they told us about were discrimination from employers, lack of access to education, unfair pay, issues with safety and security at work, and being pressured to choose self-employment.

This article explains some of the issues accessing inclusive employment that people with intellectual disabilities and their families told us they face in low- and middle-income countries.

The article also gives recommendations for how organisations doing work on inclusive employment can work towards addressing some of these barriers and being more inclusive.

 

 Journal of International Development, Volume 34, Issue 5

Disability inclusive employment in urban Malawi: A multi-perspective interview study

REMNANT, Jennifer
WANGGREN, Lena
HUQUE, Sarah
SANG, Katherine
KACHALI, Limbani
RICHARDS, James
June 2022

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The paper presents interview data from Malawian government representatives, trade unionists, employers and people with disabilities from the country's largest cities Lilongwe and Blantyre. Findings relate to the gap between the discourse of employers and government officials and that of workers with disabilities. Firstly, we find a policy-based assumption of a formalised workforce that is not representative of the predominantly informal disabled workforce. Secondly, the disruptive, intermittent and oftenreactive nature of non-governmental organisation (NGO ) interventions can limit long-term inclusivity agendas and undermine the work of disabled activists in Malawi. Lastly, we present findings on the stigmatised nature of disability in these urban centres. We find that stigma is economic: Urban workers with disabilities are discriminated against locally by employers, landlords and banks on assumptions they will not produce or earn enough to meet productivity demands, rent or repayment costs.

 

Journal of International Development, Volume 34, Issue 5

https://doi.org/10.1002/jid.3678

"We bear it and accept our fate” Perceptions of healthcare access from people with disabilities in Cox’s Bazar

PANELLA, Amanda
June 2022

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In November and December 2021, Ground Truth Solutions (GTS) and the International Organisation for Migration’s (IOM) Needs and Population Monitoring unit (NPM) conducted qualitative interviews with persons with mobility and vision impairments from Rohingya refugee and host community populations with the aim of better informing and supporting agencies in developing disability-inclusive programmes and engagement activities. These interviews focused on access to health services, aiming to gain insight into how people with disabilities experience engaging with healthcare services – as well as perceived barriers to access. It also looked at health information needs so that the humanitarian community will be better equipped to identify gaps in programming, deliver more equitable services, and build trust with this marginalised group. To weave tangible experiences into the narrative and bring findings to life, this research took a ‘user journey’ approach to create a set of ‘personas’ derived from key informant interviews with Rohingya and Host Community people with disabilities in Cox’s Bazar, resulting in this highly illustrative report.

From disability budget commitments to budget execution in Kenya: Matching disability approved allocations to actual spending and performance

Development Initiatives
May 2022

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This paper builds on previous analyses conducted by DI on disability budgeting. In this paper, we match budget commitments to implementation; first by mapping the extent to which disability-relevant budget implementation information is accessible, then by analysing financial and non-financial performance in Kenya over the financial years 2016/17 to 2020/21. We have analysed disability budget implementation in five counties (Baringo, Bungoma, Busia, Kakamega, and Vihiga) and two national sectors (Education and Social Protection).

Labour Market Assessment: Pakistan 2022

GLOW Consultants
May 2022

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This labour marker assessment has identified how the Pakistan market works and the possible entry points, so that youth with disabilities, are included in the benefits of growth and economic development. Initially the report focuses on analysing the macro-economic indicators and the sectoral contribution to GDP, followed by evaluation of labour market data, in order to identify employment rates and employment propensity of sectors and sub-sectors and to identify sectors with highest absorptive capacity. Priority subsectors were selected on the basis of the employment rate, GDP contribution and government prioritization. Value chain analysis of the selected priority subsectors was conducted to analyse possible entry point for people with disabilities in various stages of the value chain by identifying required skills and education. Subsequently, education stocks and flows were analysed to assess whether the demand of skills was coherent with the supply of skills. Existing systems were reviewed to assess the inclusion of people with disabilities in government initiatives and programmes. Likewise, government-formulated polices and legislation were appraised to understand their contribution in improving lives and safeguarding the rights of people with disabilities, followed by analyses of existing labour market information systems. Shortcomings and limitations in policies were identified, emerging issues were highlighted, and recommendations were provided to improve implementation of existing policies.

Global Report on Assistive Technology

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
May 2022

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The WHO-UNICEF Global Report on Assistive Technology (AT) reveals that more than 2.5 billion people need one or more assistive products, such as wheelchairs, hearing aids, or apps that support communication and cognition. Yet nearly one billion of them are denied access, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, where access can be as low as 3% of the need for these life-changing products.

The Global Report provides the best available evidence about the barriers currently preventing access, how access can be improved, and how enabling environments and AT can enable persons with disabilities to enjoy their human rights while generating a tremendous return on investment for governments. The report also makes 10 key recommendations for concrete actions that will improve access to AT, for everyone, that needs them. 

Access to assistive technology for children with disabilities is often the first step for childhood development, access to education, participation in sports and civic life, and getting ready for employment like their peers. Children with disabilities have additional challenges due to their growth, which requires frequent adjustments or replacements of their assistive products.

Explosive ordnance in Syria: impact and required action

May 2022

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Explosive ordnance (EO) puts one in two people in Syria at risk of death and injury and impedes the delivery of crucial humanitarian assistance. However, the extent of EO in Syria and its devastating impact is not sufficiently known or discussed among donors and humanitarian actors. International humanitarian mine action (HMA) actors operating in Syria for over ten years have come together to address this gap, sharing data and insight from their work on the ground. They produced a report to highlight the extent of EO contamination in Syria; its devastating impact on people, vital infrastructure and provision of humanitarian assistance; the crucial activities performed by humanitarian mine action (HMA) actors; and the action required to address this issue

Global disability financing in the context of Covid-19

Development Initiatives
March 2022

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The main objective of this analysis is to track global financing towards disability in near real time, which is an extension of our work on real-time data on aid before and during Covid-19 and financial tracking on disability investments. The current analysis assesses changes in global disability aid financing in the context of Covid-19 between 2019 and the third quarter (Q3) of 2021. The review uses data from the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) and considers full calendar years for 2019 and 2020 and three quarters in the year 2021.

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights for All: Disability Inclusion from Theory to Practice Women’s Integrated Sexual Health 2 Action Project (WISH2ACTION)

BERGER, Gisela
ARESU, Alessandra
NEWNHAM, Jane
March 2022

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The overall objective of this Guideline is to support project and programme developers, Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) public and private service providers, and advocates to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate inclusive SRH programmes. Realising SRHR for all requires a comprehensive, multi-sectoral, and coordinated approach, involving a range of actors and actions. The Guideline is designed to be a resource on the human rights standards and key principles required to achieve disability inclusion, with more specific guidance available for actors working at different levels of SRH service programming and service delivery. This Guideline is intended primarily to support SRHR actors and practitioners who are active at the local level. The chapters provide relevant background information and refer to selected national and international data. It contains practical recommendations to support implementation and advocacy activities, accompanied by a list of the most relevant resources available on the subject

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