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Principles and practices for the inclusion of disabled people in access to safe sanitation : a case study from Ethiopia

WILBUR, Jane
October 2010

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This report describes a formative evaluation of WaterAid’s pilot project in Butajira, Ethiopia. Using research methodologies such as a literature review, case studies, participant observation and semi-structured interviews, the findings present that WaterAid applied the charity model within its intervention and had limited impact on societal discrimination. The report concludes by recommending nine key principles for development organisations to mainstream inclusive development. This report would be useful to people interested in the inclusion of disabled people in access to safe sanitation

Pilot project on activities with differently able people (DAP) in Varshaw union under Manda upazila in Naogaon district and in Ouchpara union under Bagmara upazila in Rajshahi district

VILLAGE EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTRE (VERC )
May 2008

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This report describes the implementation of a pilot project in two areas in rural Bangladesh, to target differently able people including elderly, pregnant women, disabled people and children. The report highlights the challenges, lessons learned and recommendations, and gives a case study. Individually designed household latrines, rather than standard designs are emphasised, and photos show toilet seats that are presumably placed over a toilet hole. This project was implemented by WaterAid Banglasdesh's partner Village Education Resource Centre (VERC), with involvement of local government staff (Union Parishad officials)

Hygiene promotion in Burkina Faso and Zimbabwe : new approaches to behaviour change

SIDIBE, Mynam
CURTIS, Val
August 2004

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After years of debate, most people working in water and sanitation now agree that hygiene promotion is vitally important. But even now, many programmes either ignore it or do it badly. This field note describes two African hygiene promotion programmes that have successfully used new approaches: Saniya in burkina Faso and ZimAHEAD in Zimbabwe. Both programmes concentrated on understanding how people actually hehave and hence hot to change that behaviour. Both programmes demonstrated ideas that can be applied at a larger scale. Changin human hygiene behaviour is a long process that is difficult to measure and both of these programmes still have obstacles to overcome. However, this work indicates that systematic and carefully managed hygiene promotion programmes can achieve improvement in hygiene behaviour and hence reduction in diarrhoeal diseases

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