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Early infant diagnosis of HIV through dried blood spot testing

PATHFINDER INTERNATIONAL / KENYA
October 2007

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Until recently the test used to diagnose HIV in babies under one-year has required sophisticated and expensive equipment. A new test has now been developed - dried blood spot testing which can be used to diagnose HIV as early as six weeks after a baby is born and has the advantage of being easy to prepare in a resource-limited setting and shipped to testing facilities without refrigeration. If a baby is given prophylactic antibiotics, such as cotrimoxazole, soon after birth and Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) as soon as is medically indicated, it has a good chance of surviving childhood and living a long, healthy life

Towards a stronger response to HIV and AIDS: challenging stigma

International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
2007

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This is an internal paper for the Department for International Development (DFID) that looks at information and evidence for the global prevalence of HIV stigma and how it is damaging people living with HIV and AIDS and their families, especially women. It also looks at evidence that this compromises effective responses to AIDS by lowering the uptake of preventative services and testing, delays disclosure, decreases care seeking and undermines treatment. The paper examines successful strategies that have been used to tackle stigma and suggests that DFID is well placed to help scale-up efforts and play a leading role in the international arena

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