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Strengthening participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy

SIMMONS, Dr. Catharine
ROBINSON, Dr. Sally
October 2014

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Participation by children and young people in advocacy and change-making can not only improve and foster positive change in their own lives, but also influence the lives of others. When young people’s participation is supported, meaningful and engaged, multiple benefits accrue; their perspectives and experiences bring a unique contribution and can result in rights-based empowerment, enacted citizenship and improved relationships. This has the potential to shape policy, to increase the relevance and responsiveness of organisations they use, and to influence change in their communities in positive ways

 

However, there are significant issues and a range of barriers that discourage, prevent or actively exclude children and young people with disability from participating. A culture of low expectations, social and cultural barriers, relationship and identity difficulties and practical hurdles exist for many young people. As a result, many are precluded from participation, particularly around change-making activities

 

This paper examines how meaningful participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy and change-making can be strengthened. In the paper CDA calls for the promotion of children and young people’s participation as active and valued community members

 

This paper is also available at https://www.cyda.org.au/cda-issue-papers

 

Issue Papers

Inclusive disaster risk management : briefing paper

SHARMA, Anshu
et al
2014

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This briefing paper  presents the case for building safer, more resilient communities in South Asia using evidence-based inclusive approaches to Disaster Risk Management (DRM) through multi-stakeholder engagement. It is based on the learning from the Inclusive Community Resilience for Sustainable Disaster Risk Management (INCRISD) South Asia project, currently being implemented in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. It concludes by highlighting ten recommendations more inclusive Disaster Risk Management framework, and, while the paper is based on South Asia experiences, the recommendations and approaches can have global application

Towards the post-2105 framework for disaster risk reduction (HFA2) : women as a force in resilience building, gender equality in disaster risk reduction

PREVENTION WEB
April 2014

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This paper argues that gender integration and women’s empowerment need to be approached within the paradigm shift in disaster risk reduction (DRR) thinking internationally, as embodied by the development of the post-2015 Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction. The paper outlines the background to the previous international framework, the Hyogo Framework for Action, and why women's integration should be an important priority for any further agreement. The paper then discusses the role and importance of women in DRR, and analyses lessons learned from the Hyogo Framework's implementation. Finally, the authors conclude by presenting a 'way forward' for increasing the inclusion of women in DRR, based on empowerment, data desegregation and local, national and international frameworks

Gender inclusion for social resilience : a key factor in disaster risk reduction

POURNIK, Milad
CHUNG, Jaeeun
MILLER, Barbara
December 2012

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"This report offers a brief review of the concept of social resilience, especially in relation to natural disasters and with specific attention to women and girls as victims of disasters and active participants in disaster prevention and response. It next provides a summary of a conference that took place at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs on October 11, 2012, marking the United Nations International Day for Disaster Reduction and its 2012 theme, Women & Girls: The inVisible Source of Resilience. Last, it summarizes how social resilience can create more secure societies in a changing world"

Global Gender Program, Occasional Paper #2

Identifying and supporting vulnerable people in community-led total sanitation : a Bangladesh case study

FAWZI, A
JONES, H
2011

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Community – led sanitation often neglects the poorest and most disadvantaged people in society as they are often unable to participate. This paper looked at the experiences of three CLTS communities in Bangladesh. It found that a well being ranking, amongst other things, should be used to help identify vulnerable members in the community and that vulnerable people themselves strongly believe in the power of CLTS to improve their livelihoods and their importance in the participation of CLTS activities. Furthermore, vulnerable people are motivated to move up the sanitation ladder and most households have made improvements to their latrine. Finally, the installation of toilet seats on latrines to aid disabled people has in some cases decreased the sanitation independence of other household members 

Inclusive local development : how to implement a disability approach at local level

PLANTIER-ROYON, Eric
November 2009

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This policy paper outlines Handicap International's mandate and values in the field of the inclusive local development. It presents the organisation's actions, choices and commitments in the area of local inclusive development, and provides the six main components of projects. Future possibilities and potential limitations are also highlighted. This policy paper is useful to people who have an interest in disability rights and inclusive local development initiatives

The epidemic divide

HEALTH AND CARE DEPARTMENT, INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (ICRC)
July 2009

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The burden of epidemics of infectious diseases on the social and economic development of poorer countries is growing, but is not being sufficiently addressed. This paper argues that to reduce the impact of epidemics involves addressing complex issues that include prevention of disease, empowering communities, better access to health services at the community level, availability of health personnel and better infrastructure (especially for water and sanitation)

Change at hand : web 2.0 for development

ASHLEY, Holly
et al
June 2009

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There are dozens of emerging interactive web services and applications, sometimes referred to as the ‘participatory’, ‘social’ or ‘readwrite’ web, but more commonly known as Web 2.0. Together, they are radically changing the ways we create, share, collaborate and publish digital information through the Internet. These new technical opportunities bring challenges as well as opportunities that we need to understand and grasp. Most of the themed articles are based on presentations made at the the international Web2forDev conference, 25-27 September 2007 at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) headquarters in Rome, Italy

Coordination for vulnerable children : Alliance Zambia’s efforts to strengthen government and community OVC systems

ALLIANCE FOR COMMUNITY ACTION ON HEALTH IN ZAMBIA (Alliance Zambia)
2009

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Based on its experience of implementing a programme to strengthen community support systems for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC), Alliance Zambia sees coordination within government, and partnership between government and civil society, as essential building blocks for effective OVC support

The active community engagement continuum

RUSSELL, Nancy
et al
July 2008

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The active community engagement continuum (ACE) provides a framework for analysing community engagement in reproductive health and family planning and the role the community plays in institutionalising lasting behaviour and social change. It involves a process that includes the sharing of information with stakeholders and the local community

Best practices in the socio-economic rehabilitation of persons affected by leprosy and other marginalised people in their communities: findings from nine evaluations in Bangladesh, India and Africa.

VELEEMA, Johan P
2008

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The evaluation of 9 socio-economic rehabilitation programmes (SER), in 4 countries in Africa, in Bangladesh and in India from 2002-2005 is presented. All the 9 programmes focused on supporting individual leprosy-affected individuals or their families. Four projects also supported other marginalised clients. The usual interventions were micro-credit, housing and sponsoring of education for the children. The recommendations touched upon each of the five steps in individual rehabilitation: selection of clients, needs assessment, choosing an intervention, monitoring/follow--up of clients during rehabilitation, and separation at the end of the process. The evaluators also suggested ways in which participation of the client in their own rehabilitation might be boosted, made recommendations for the organisational structure of programmes, on maximising community involvement and emphasised the importance of information systems and of investing in the programme staff. A number of recommendations were specific to the types of interventions implemented. Bringing together the recommendations resulted in a description of best practices in the implementation of SER programmes, derived from actual experiences in different contexts.
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, vol.19, no.1, 2008

What's culture got to do with HIV and AIDS : why the global strategy for HIV and AIDS needs to adopt a cultural approach

GOULD, Helen
February 2007

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This findings paper reports the initial findings from HIV/AIDS: The Creative Challenge, a project which is developing reflective discussion with field practitioners and policy makers on the value of cultural approaches to HIV and AIDS. It provides an introductory analysis of the concept of culture, looks at examples and success stories of effective application of cultural approaches to HIV and AIDS communication, and sets out the terms of the debate around culture in the context of the current international HIV and AIDS strategy. It calls for a change in donor culture with a shift towards ‘softer’, qualitative impact measurements in monitoring and evaluation practices and for a recognition at the local, national and international levels of the cultural dimension of the pandemic

Scaling up memory work : the example of KIWAKKUKI in Tanzania

WARD, Nicola
ITEMBA, Dafrosa
2006

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Scaling up the memory work and extending it from Uganda to other African countries involved many challenges due to the wide range of different contexts, different types of implementing organisations and different cultures. This edition of Health Exchange gives an example from Tanzania where the organisation KIWAKKUKI, has developed a memory project based on experience and learning from NACWOLA in Uganda, but adapted to its specific cultural and organisational context

Participatory communication in malaria control : why does it matter?

DUNN, Alison
October 2005

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This paper reviews current approaches to malaria control, focusing on effective ways of engaging with local communities in participatory ways. It argues for considering human behaviour as well as mosquito behaviour in malaria control efforts. Engaging with people at community level is critical to developing interventions that are appropriate to the local context. Complex social and environmental factors, such as gender relationships, the cost of drugs, and the appropriateness of services mean that communication processes are vital, and will require sustained and coordinated international support and commitment

Strenthening service accountability and community participation in health sector reforms

MURTHY, Ranjani K
July 2005

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This policy brief focuses on the need for community participation in the design of policies, legislation and the allocation of budgets as well as the more expected areas of health programme management and service delivery. It is based on a review of community participation and sexual and reproductive health service accountability in World Bank-supported health sector reforms in Africa, Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean

Community capacity enhancement strategy note : the answer lies within

GUEYE, Moustapha
et al
2005

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Th is publication outlines the rationale and strategy behind the UNPD Community Capacity Enhancement (CCE) programme and provides a guide for its implementation. The programme is an integral part of UNDP's Leadership for Results programme and is based on a methodology known as Community Conversations. The CCE programme is aimed at dealing with the underlying causes of HIV/AIDS, be they power relations, gender issues, stigma or discrimination. Most community methodologies rightly focus on awareness-raising and discussion; CCE focuses heavily on interactive dialogue on the epidemic's deeper causes and, through a facilitated process, community decision-making and action. The note also contains implementation guidelines and describes key steps in facilitating Community Conversations

Health care access of the very poor in Kenya

SOHANI, Salim B
2005

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This paper reviews a model of health care delivery for the poorest, developed in Kenya. "It illustrates that a pro-poor health system can be developed if the true representatives of the poorest are enabled to participate in health care delivery, and good governance and proper systems are established...With the active involvement of the community in a mutually supportive manner, the utilisation of services and access to basic health care for the poorest can be improved"

School readiness

WATSON, Johanna
February 2003

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This paper presents an overview of main theoretical approaches to school readiness and of the critical themes relating to children's transition to school. It analyses the demands, implications and predictors of a successful transition both at the individual level - children's social competence, physical health, emotional stability, language skills, discipline - and at social level, looking at how parents can support their children in the transition process, how to assess whether the school is ready for the child but also introducing the concept of school readiness of the community, emphasising a shift from the individual - child's abilities and/or parents' skills - to the society - the community's ability to respond to the educational needs of children

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