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‘Black on the inside’: albino subjectivity in the African novel

LIPENGA, Ken Junior
NGMIRA, Emmanuel
2018

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The last decade has seen increased attention to the treatment of people with albinism in several African countries, particularly the peril they find themselves in due to stigma and superstition. As a way of countering these misconceptions, there has been educative activism from legal, medical as well as religious perspectives. In this paper, we draw upon a different discourse- literary representation- arguing that in selected African novels, the authors employ a variety of strategies that counter harmful stereotypes about albinism, and in the process act as literary interventions that enable an appreciation of the person behind the skin condition. Drawing from insights in Literary Disability Studies, the discussion examines the representation of albinism in four African novels: Petina Gappah’s The Book of Memory (2015), Meg Vandermerwe’s Zebra Crossing (2013), Unathi Magubeni’s Nwelezelanga: The Star Child (2016), and Jenny Robson’s Because Pula Means Rain (2000), and highlights the way albinism is presented as bodily condition that intersects with other experiences on the continent, including indigenous epistemologies, gender, sexuality and family relationships. 

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1472-1487

African Disability Rights Yearbook volume 5 2017

NGWENA, Charles
et al
2017

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This volume of the African Disability Rights Yearbook is divided into four sections presenting articles, country reports, commentaries on regional developments and a book review. The first section A of the journal presents a number of articles on issues affecting people with disabilities in Africa, ranging from education and rights of children with disabilities to albinism. Section B presents country reports on Djibouti and Madagascar. Section C presents two articles: one on mental health and the other on disability rights developments in the East African Community post-2012. Finally a review of E. Barnes’s 2016 book "The minority body: A theory of disability" is given.

 

Disability and the global South (DGS) 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

DISABILITY AND THE GLOBAL SOUTH
2015

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This journal presents six articles in this collection about disability in several countries. Articles include research on typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, analysis of policy that aims to reduce the mental health treatment gap in Africa, research on inclusive education in Kenya and others

Disability & the global South (DGS), Vol. 2 No. 3

African disability rights yearbook

NGWENA, Charles
et al
2015

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This volume of the African Disability Rights Yearbook is divided into three sections presenting articles, country reports and commentaries on regional developments, and has added a new feature in the form of a book review section. The first section (A) of the journal presents a number of articles on issues affecting people with disabilities in Africa, ranging from sexual and reproductive rights to socio-economic issues. Section B presents a number of country reports on Eritrea, Lesotho, Morocco, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tunisia. Section C presents two articles focussing on regional development; one on disability rights and emergency legislation, and another on the right to political participation for people with disabilities in Africa. Finally the journal presents a review of A.S. Kanter’s 2014 book "The development of disability rights under international law: From charity to human rights"

Volume 3

Special issue on access to medicines, pricing and generics

September 2009

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This issue has articles about medicine prices in Vietnam, Thailand and South Africa, generic medicines in Malaysia and Australia, anti-retroviral therapy in South Africa, and legislation and regulation in the retail pharmacy sector in low-income countries.
Southern Med Review : Vol 2, Issue 2

Transitions in the early years : a learning opportunity [whole issue]

November 2006

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This issue of Early Childhood Matters presents a number of perspectives around children's transition from home environments to primary schooling and includes practical examples of initiatives in a number of countries, including the US, India, Uganda, Guatemala, Poland, Brazil and Israel. Articles look at transition and school readiness as a challenge and a learning opportunity rather than as a problem. In different contexts the emphasis of related early childhood programmes varies. The 'Parques Infantis' in Brazil focuses on children's rights, while in Guatemala and Uganda programmes reflect a need to promote local culture and support children learning the mainstream language. The Mississippi Delta Children's Partnership encourages interaction between pre-schools, primary schools and parents as a means to facilitate transition and supports school readiness through after-school programmes

Violence against young children : a painful issue [whole issue]

June 2006

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The Convention on the Rights of the Child condemns 'all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation', and yet cultural practices often tolerate or even encourage some forms of violence, such as corporal punishment, genital mutilation or forced early marriage. This issue of Early Childhood Matters aims to contribute to the debate around the concept and practice of violence, abuse and neglect. Includes case studies of projects designed to reduce violence at home, in schools and in the streets

Memory work [whole issue]

June 2005

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This issue of Medicus Mundi Schweiz Bulletin is devoted to memory work. Articles describe the evolution of memory books and memory work; NACWOLA’s experiences in Uganda; scaling up memory work; and related projects and tools such as hero books and the Ten Million Memories Project

Do unlikely partners contribute to an informed society? [whole issue]

MCBEAN, Bridget
December 2004

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This brief resource highlights the link between development and innovation, and knowledge and information accessibility. The process of creating an informed society depends not only on the availability of information technology and infrastructures, but also and primarily on people, as the creators and users of knowledge. The paper calls for improvements in the e-readiness of developing countries, higher literacy levels and better protection of the right to information

Africa Health

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Africa Health Journal covers a wide range of health issues, and therefore does not always cover health care technology issues

Illuminating voices

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Through a global team of local journalists, this magazine reports on development issues that are often neglected by mainstream media
Bi-monthly
Free online

Women's health journal

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Addresses women's health from a gender perspective and promotes reproductive and sexual rights. Reports on activities of network member groups
Two or three times a year
US$40
Free online

Our rights [formerly: Disability tribune, previously: Disability awareness in action]|the International Disability and Human Rights Network

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Disability Awareness in Action (DAA) is an information network on disability and human rights. Our Rights is DAA's monthly publication on disability rights. The newletters contain up to date information about the CRPD and news about disability rights in the UK and internationally. Links are provided to newsletters dated from July 2008 to present and to DAA's former newsletter, The Disability Tribune. The newletters are available to download in word, PDF and text format. This resource is useful for people in disability and development focusing upon the rights-based initiative
Monthly
Free

Disability now

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UK-based newspaper about disability issues. A chat forum is hosted on this site and it provides news, articles and links by subject. Free subscription to recieve this publication by email
Free

Journal of research in special educational needs (JORSEN)

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JORSEN is an electronic journal which disseminates research on special educational needs. JORSEN aims to publish original research, literature reviews and theoretical papers on meeting special educational needs, create a forum for researchers to reflect on, and share ideas regarding, issues of particular importance to them such as methodology, research design and ethical issues, and reach a wide multi-disciplinary national and international audience through online publication
Three times a year

International journal of inclusive education

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This journal provides a strategic forum for international and multi-disciplinary dialogue on inclusive education for all educators and educational policy-makers concerned with the form and nature of schools, universities and technical colleges
10 issues a year (from 2011, previously eight)
Print: (individual only) 589.00 USD
Online Only: 1,135.00 USD
Print & Online: 1,261.00 USD
Selected articles are free to read online

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E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

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