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Disability and global health: Special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

KUPER, Hannah
POLAK, Sarah
Eds
2019

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Papers included in this special issue are:

 

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2019, Vol. 6 No. 1. Special issue: Disability and the decolonial turn: Perspectives from the Americas

2019

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Articles included are:

  • Disability, Decoloniality, and Other-than-Humanist Ethics in Anzaldúan Thought
  • Decolonizing Schools: Women Organizing, Disability Advocacy, and Land in Sāmoa
  • Adapting an Education Program for Parents of Children with Autism from the United States to Colombia
  • Precarious Bodies, Precarious Lives: Framing Disability in Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Cinema
     

 

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Volume 29, No.2, 2018 (Summer 2018)

July 2018

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Research articles are:

  • Lived Experience of Psychosocial Disability and Social Inclusion: A Participatory Photovoice Study in Rural India and Nepal
  • Barriers and Facilitators for Wheelchair Users in Bangladesh: A Participatory Action Research Project
  • A Cross-sectional Survey of Rehabilitation Service Provision for Children with Brain Injury in Selangor, Malaysia
  • Effect of Abacus Training on Numerical Ability of Students with Hearing Loss
  • Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Evaluation of Psychometric Properties of Persian Version of Supports Intensity Scale among Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Review:

  • Developmental Social Work for Promoting the Socioeconomic Participation of Persons with Disabilities: An Application of the Capability Approach
     

Brief reports:

  • Zero Rejection Policy in Admission of Children with Special Needs - Myth or Reality
  • Ujamaa and Universal Design: Developing Sustainable Tactile Curricular Materials in Rural Tanzania

Disability Equality: In Theory and Practice. Social Inclusion, volume 6, issue 1 (2018)

PRIESTLEY, Mark
WADDINGTON, Lisa
Eds
March 2018

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This special issue of this journal includes the following papers:

  • Achieving Disability Equality: Empowering Disabled People to Take the Lead
  • Dis-Equality: Exploring the Juxtaposition of Disability and Equality
  • Leveraging Employer Practices in Global Regulatory Frameworks to Improve Employment Outcomes for People with Disabilities
  • Equality of What? The Capability Approach and the Right to Education for Persons with Disabilities
  • Reasonable Accommodation as a Gateway to the Equal Enjoyment of Human Rights: From New York to Strasbourg
  • Disability, Access to Food and the UN CRPD: Navigating Discourses of Human Rights in the Netherlands
  • Rehabilitation as a Disability Equality Issue: A Conceptual Shift for Disability Studies?
  • Inclusions and Exclusions in Rural Tanzanian Primary Schools: Material Barriers, Teacher Agency and Disability Equality
  • Education, Work, and Motherhood in Low and Middle Income Countries: A Review of Equality Challenges and Opportunities for Women with Disabilities
  • Social Inclusion through Community Living: Current Situation, Advances and Gaps in Policy, Practice and Research


 

Yuin, Kamilaroi, Sámi, and Maori people’s reflections on experiences as ‘Indigenous scholars’ in ‘Disability Studies’ and ‘Decolonisation’

GILROYA, John
UTTJEKB, Margaretha
GIBSONC, Chontel
SMILERD, Kirsten
2018

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This paper compares and contrasts individual stories of Indigenous peoples working as researchers, with a focus on disability. Firstly, they provide a background to the aim of decolonisation methodology. Second, they highlight their individual stories about thier work, including how they tailored and implemented decolonisation in their research methodology and practices more broadly. They then compare the similarities and differences between their experiences.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1344-1364

Audiology and speech-language pathology: Practitioners’ reflections on indigeneity, disability and neo-colonial marketing

PILLAYA, Mershen
KATHARD, Harsha
2018

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Indigenous peoples are part of those populations who are underserved by Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. They include minority world populations like Aboriginal Australians/Canadians and majority world peoples in Asia, Africa and the Americas. How do Western-oriented rehabilitation/disability practitioners practice with Others? In this article, we reflect on our own experiences and use ideological critique to reveal the fault lines in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology practices. Along with other examples, we analyse South African data. We reveal predominant practices/ideologies that contribute to the production of disability. We focus on three interconnected issues (i) the construction of rehabilitation/disability practitioners as (il)legitimate providers for indigenous peoples; (ii) the engagement of epistemic violence across disability practice, educational and policy domains; and (iii) the authoritative (re)inscription of indigenous persons as disabled by transnational practitioners who, like their corporate counterparts, market practices. Professional marketeering is infused with bigotry, masked as benevolence and resourced/justified by global, neo-liberal policies (e.g., international conventions) and funding. We conclude that disability practices and indigeneity in the post-colonial moment capitalises on established settler-native relationships to continue dominance over Others’ lives.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1385-1406 

‘My granddaughter doesn’t know she has disabilities and we are not going to tell her’: Navigating intersections of indigenousness, disability and gender in Labrador

STIENSTRA, Deborah
BAIKIE, Gail
MANNING, Susan
2018

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Drawing from qualitative research and over five years of relationship-building with women in Labrador, Canada, this article explores the intersections of Indigenousness, disability and gender. Labrador offers a unique perspective with its three Indigenous nations, including one Indigenous self-government and settler populations; its remote and Northern location; and its long history as a site for resource exploitation, global military presence and colonial displacements. We explore how these features shape the experiences of women with disabilities, including in rejecting the label of ‘disability’ and finding spaces in their communities of both inclusion and exclusion. Understanding the experiences of women with disabilities in Labrador requires recognizing the disabling consequences of colonization and the fast-track urbanization that has accompanied resource development in the region. We highlight some Indigenous models of inclusion that are already working and can provide an opportunity for service providers, governments and those living in communities to learn from them.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1385-1406 

‘Black on the inside’: albino subjectivity in the African novel

LIPENGA, Ken Junior
NGMIRA, Emmanuel
2018

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The last decade has seen increased attention to the treatment of people with albinism in several African countries, particularly the peril they find themselves in due to stigma and superstition. As a way of countering these misconceptions, there has been educative activism from legal, medical as well as religious perspectives. In this paper, we draw upon a different discourse- literary representation- arguing that in selected African novels, the authors employ a variety of strategies that counter harmful stereotypes about albinism, and in the process act as literary interventions that enable an appreciation of the person behind the skin condition. Drawing from insights in Literary Disability Studies, the discussion examines the representation of albinism in four African novels: Petina Gappah’s The Book of Memory (2015), Meg Vandermerwe’s Zebra Crossing (2013), Unathi Magubeni’s Nwelezelanga: The Star Child (2016), and Jenny Robson’s Because Pula Means Rain (2000), and highlights the way albinism is presented as bodily condition that intersects with other experiences on the continent, including indigenous epistemologies, gender, sexuality and family relationships. 

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1472-1487

Disability and sexuality: claiming sexual and reproductive rights.

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH MATTERS
July 2017

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The journal issue Reproductive Health Matters, vol.25, no.50, May 2017 features disability and sexuality.

 

Research article titles are:

  • Disability is not asexuality: the childbearing experiences and aspirations of women with disability in Zimbabwe
  • Exploring misinformation of family planning practices and methods among deaf people in Ghana
  • “We do not dare to love”: women with disabilities’ sexual and reproductive health and rights in rural Cambodia
  • A qualitative study to explore the barriers and enablers for young people with disabilities to access sexual and reproductive health services in Senegal
  • “Freedom to go where I want”: improving access to sexual and reproductive health for women with disabilities in the Philippines
  • The sexual and reproductive rights and benefit derived from sexual and reproductive health services of people with physical disabilities in South Africa: beliefs of non-disabled people
  • Female genital mutilation as sexual disability: perceptions of women and their spouses in Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria. 

African Disability Rights Yearbook volume 5 2017

NGWENA, Charles
et al
2017

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This volume of the African Disability Rights Yearbook is divided into four sections presenting articles, country reports, commentaries on regional developments and a book review. The first section A of the journal presents a number of articles on issues affecting people with disabilities in Africa, ranging from education and rights of children with disabilities to albinism. Section B presents country reports on Djibouti and Madagascar. Section C presents two articles: one on mental health and the other on disability rights developments in the East African Community post-2012. Finally a review of E. Barnes’s 2016 book "The minority body: A theory of disability" is given.

 

Disability, CBR and inclusive development (DCID) - Vol 27, No 4 (2016)

THOMAS, Maya
Ed
2016

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"Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development aim to enhance knowledge in the field of disability, addressing the needs of practitioners in the field (particularly those from developing countries), policy makers, disabled persons’ organizations and the scientific community. The journal encourages publication of information that is evidence-based, to improve current knowledge and programmes implementation, and will be openly and freely accessible to all readers" ”Published four times a year, previously published two times per year
Free

European Human Rights report, issue 1 – 2016 Marking 10 years of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Europe

LEENKNECHT An-Sofie
CONTE Carmine
December 2016

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Here is the first issue of a series of European Human Rights Reports launched by European Disability Forum. This first issue focuses on the 10th anniversary of the CRPD giving an overview of the state of play and progress made with regards to the CRPD in Europe.

It was launched on the occasion of a 2-day conference organised by the European Commission and EDF on 29-30 November 2016, as 2016’s European Day of Persons with Disabilities marked the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD), . The conference gathered together around 400 participants including people with disabilities and their representative organisations, associations and companies working to improve the life of people with disabilities, government representatives, EU institutions representatives, academics and many others. Together they have been discussing and ethe progress made in the European Union (EU) to promote the rights of persons with disabilities in line with the CRPD: each panel gave an overview of the legal and policy framework, and how it had changed, followed by personal testimonies and examples.
 
 

Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ) - Volume 36, Issue No. 4 (2016)

DISABILITY STUDY QUARTERLY
October 2016

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 Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ) is the journal of the Society for Disability Studies (SDS). It is a multidisciplinary and international journal of interest to social scientists, scholars in the humanities, disability rights advocates, creative writers, and others concerned with the issues of people with disabilities. It represents the full range of methods, epistemologies, perspectives, and content that the multidisciplinary field of disability studies embraces. DSQ is committed to developing theoretical and practical knowledge about disability and to promoting the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities in society.

Disabled children and disabling childhoods in the global South

BURMAN, Erica
GREENSTEIN, Anat
KUMAR, Manasi
Eds
2015

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This resource provides a link to the articles of the Disability and the Global South journal’s Special Issue on disabled children within the Global South. This special issue features a variety of topics such as rehabilitation, inclusion, child sexual abuse, and the disabling effects of education systems within the Global South

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), Vol 2, Issue 2

Disability and the global South (DGS) 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

DISABILITY AND THE GLOBAL SOUTH
2015

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This journal presents six articles in this collection about disability in several countries. Articles include research on typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, analysis of policy that aims to reduce the mental health treatment gap in Africa, research on inclusive education in Kenya and others

Disability & the global South (DGS), Vol. 2 No. 3

African disability rights yearbook

NGWENA, Charles
et al
2015

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This volume of the African Disability Rights Yearbook is divided into three sections presenting articles, country reports and commentaries on regional developments, and has added a new feature in the form of a book review section. The first section (A) of the journal presents a number of articles on issues affecting people with disabilities in Africa, ranging from sexual and reproductive rights to socio-economic issues. Section B presents a number of country reports on Eritrea, Lesotho, Morocco, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tunisia. Section C presents two articles focussing on regional development; one on disability rights and emergency legislation, and another on the right to political participation for people with disabilities in Africa. Finally the journal presents a review of A.S. Kanter’s 2014 book "The development of disability rights under international law: From charity to human rights"

Volume 3

Where can design have the greatest impact in the next five years?

CASEY, Valerie
Ed
April 2014

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This special 100th journal issue focuses on women, design and social impact. The concept of "Design for all" is that the starting point should be the needs of people with activity limitation, such as physical, sensory and mental or cognitive limitation, and spaces, buildings and products should be designed to be accessible to all without losing the aesthetic or adding to cost.

The Journal contains 10 short essays by designers addressing issues such as: the need to assess the requirements of users first; exploring the political and social aspects of design; the responsibilities of designers; design as a problem solving tool;design to improve the lives of the poorest; sustainability; development; technology; and the environment

Design For All Journal​, Vol 9, No 4 

Research & humanities in medical education (RHiME)

DHALIWAL, Upreet
et al
March 2014

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Research and Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME) is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal with the vision to blend humanities with the sciences in medical education. It aims to encourage contributions from and discussion between teachers and students, doctors and patients, the sick and their care-providers, and between health policy makers and policy users

Globalising mental health or pathologising the global south? : mapping the ethics, theory and practice of global mental health

MILLS, China
FERNANDO, Suman
Eds
2014

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In response to moves from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Movement for Global Mental Health (MGMH) to redress the unequal access to mental health care in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) compared to high-income countries (HICs), the papers in this special issue of Disability and the Global South seek to highlight the issues of simply exporting a system developed in the global North irrespective of social and cultural context and lay the ground for (re)imagining and practising healing and support differently in LMICs and in HICs. The issue is a collection of 14 articles, including voices from the field

Disability and the Global South, Vol. 1, No.2

Evacuation of people with visual impairments

Sørensen, Janne Gress
2014

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This Study aimed to increase knowledge and data on evacuation characteristics of vulnerable people and with a special focus on blind and visually impaired people.

 

An experimental program designed to obtain data on walking speeds horizontally and descending stairs, interaction between participants and their interaction with the building environment. Experiments were conducted in different buildings including office buildings, an institutional building and a tunnel. In total 148 people have participated in the experiments. Parallel to the evacuation experiments participants were interviewed not only about their experience with the experiments but also their use of different building types and the difficulties they meet.

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