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Minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (IFRC)
November 2018

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The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies (2018) is in its second edition. The first pilot version of the IFRC Minimum standard commitments to gender and diversity in emergency programming was published in 2015. The pilot version has been tested globally by Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, volunteers and management in low-, medium- and high-scale disasters and humanitarian crises. This edition is the result of three years of testing, revision and feedback from protection, gender and inclusion (PGI) and sectoral specialists. New chapters, such as cash-based interventions, have been added as well as a stronger focus on sexual and gender-based violence and disability inclusion to align with the commitments of the IFRC and its member National Societies. This edition is accompanied by the IFRC Protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies toolkit (2018–2019).

This guidance presents Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, members and volunteers with a set of minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion (PGI) in emergencies. It aims to ensure that the emergency programming of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and National Societies provides dignity, access, participation and safety for all people affected by disasters and crises.

It provides practical guidance on how to mainstream these four principles in all sectors, based on a consideration of gender, age, disability and other diversity factors. This includes limiting people’s exposure to the risks of violence and abuse and ensuring that emergency programmes “do no harm”.

The standards address protection, gender and inclusion concerns by providing practical ways to engage with all members of the community, respond to their differing needs and draw on their capacities in the most non-discriminatory and effective way. This helps to ensure that local perspectives guide assistance delivery. The standards also support incorporation of the seven Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

Including children with disabilities in humanitarian action

UNICEF
July 2017

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"The purpose of Including Children with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action is to strengthen the inclusion of children and women with disabilities, and their families, in emergency preparedness, response and early recovery, and recovery and reconstruction. This series of booklets provides insight into the situation of children with disabilities in humanitarian contexts, highlights the ways in which they are excluded from humanitarian action, and offers practical actions and tips to better include children and adolescents with disabilities in all stages of humanitarian action. The booklets were created in response to UNICEF colleagues in the field expressing a need for a practical resource to guide their work. The information and recommendations are based on evidence and good practices gathered from literature and field staff experiences. The six booklets on how to include children and adolescents with disabilities in humanitarian programmes are as follows: 1) general guidance; 2) child protection; 3) education; 4) health and HIV/AIDS; 5) nutrition; 6) water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)".

General guidance available July 2017. Others to follow.

In addition to the PDF versions in English, Arabic and French, the guidance is also available in a range of accessible formats, including EPUB, a Braille-ready file and accessible HTML formats. 

The guidance was developed in collaboration with Handicap International.

Education 2030 Incheon Declaration And Framework for action towards inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning for all

WORLD EDUCATION FORUM 2015
2015

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UNESCO together with UNICEF, the World Bank, UNFPA, UNDP, UN Women and UNHCR organized the World Education Forum 2015 in Incheon, Republic of Korea, from 19 – 22 May 2015, hosted by the Republic of Korea. Over 1,600 participants from 160 countries, including over 120 Ministers, heads and members of delegations, heads of agencies and officials of multilateral and bilateral organizations, and representatives of civil society, the teaching profession, youth and the private sector, adopted the Incheon Declaration for Education 2030, which sets out a new vision for education for the next fifteen years.

Towards 2030: a new vision for education

Our vision is to transform lives through education, recognizing the important role of education as a main driver of development and in achieving the other proposed SDGs. We commit with a sense of urgency to a single, renewed education agenda that is holistic, ambitious and aspirational, leaving no one behind. This new vision is fully captured by the proposed SDG 4 “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all” and its corresponding targets. It is transformative and universal, attends to the ‘unfinished business’ of the EFA agenda and the education-related MDGs, and addresses global and national education challenges. It is inspired by a humanistic vision of education and development based on human rights and dignity; social justice; inclusion; protection; cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity; and shared responsibility and accountability. We reaffirm that education is a public good, a fundamental human right and a basis for guaranteeing the realization of other rights. It is essential for peace, tolerance, human fulfilment and sustainable development. We recognize education as key to achieving full employment and poverty eradication. We will focus our efforts on access, equity and inclusion, quality and learning outcomes, within a lifelong learning approach.

 

Action and commitments required to implement the agenda are presented.

Human development report 2013|The rise of the south : human progress in a diverse world

MALIK, Khalid
et al
2013

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This report "examines the profound shift in global dynamics driven by the fast-rising new powers of the developing world and its long-term implications for human development....The report identifies four specific areas of focus for sustaining development momentum: enhancing equity, including on the gender dimension; enabling greater voice and participation of citizens, including youth; confronting environmental pressures; and managing demographic change

Common European guidelines on the transition from institutional to community based care|Guidance on implementing and supporting a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community-based alternatives for children, persons with dis

THE EUROPEAN EXPERT GROUP ON THE TRANSITION FROM INSTITUTIONAL TO COMMUNITY BASED CARE (EEG)
November 2012

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These guidelines "provide practical advice about how to make a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community based alternatives for individuals currently living in institutions and those living in the community, often without adequate support. The Guidelines are aimed primarily at policy and decision makers in the European Union and the neighbouring countries with responsibility for the provision of care and support services for children, people with disabilities and their families, people with mental health problems and older people"

Toolkit on the use of European Union funds for the transition from institutional to community based care

THE EUROPEAN EXPERT GROUP ON THE TRANSITION FROM INSTITUTIONAL TO COMMUNITY BASED CARE (EEG)
November 2012

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This toolkit "aims to explain how European Union funds can support national, regional and local authorities in designing and implementing structural reforms aimed at facilitating the development of quality family-based and community-based alternatives to institutional care. It addresses primarily the desk officers of the European Commission, managing authorities, intermediate bodies, monitoring committees and project promoters in the EU Member States and in acceding, candidate and potential candidate countries; and any other donors investing in services for children, people with disabilities, people with mental health problems or older people"

Disability and work : global strategies for equity

MC GILL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND SOCIAL POLICY
2012

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This website provides conference details and links to the keynote and plenary presentations. International government, academic, business and civil society leaders presented information highlighting innovative and effective strategies to improve employment outcomes for workers with disabilities presented by. This resource is useful to anyone interested in global strategies for equity in disability and work
"Disability and work : global strategies for equity"
Montreal, Canada
5 May 2012

The world development report 2012 : jobs

THE WORLD BANK
2012

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This report "takes the centrality of jobs in the development process as its starting point and challenges and re-frames how we think about work. Adopting a cross-sectorial and multi-disciplinary approach, the Report looks at why some jobs do more for development than others. The Report finds that the jobs with the greatest development payoffs are those that make cities function better, connect the economy to global markets, protect the environment, foster trust and civic engagement, or reduce poverty. Critically, these jobs are not only found in the formal sector; depending on the country context, informal jobs can also be transformational"...The Report advances a three-stage approach to help governments meet these objectives. First, policy fundamentals "including macroeconomic stability, an enabling business environment, investments in human capital, and the rule of law" are essential for both growth and job creation. Second, well-designed labour policies can help ensure that growth translates into employment opportunities, but they need to be complemented by a broader approach to job creation that looks beyond the labor market. Third, governments should strategically identify which jobs would do the most for development given their specific country context, and remove or offset the obstacles that prevent the private sector from creating more of those jobs
Note: Links are provided to full document and separate files containing the messages, overview, each chapter and statistical annex

Europeans, development aid and the millennium development goals

TNS OPINION & SOCIAL
September 2010

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Based upon a survey, this report provides an overview of European perspectives towards development. The report analyses the European public opinion on development policy and the role that the EU plays as aid donor in the context of the current economic crisis and the forthcoming UN Summit on the Millennium Development Goals. This report is useful for anyone interested in European development aid and the millennium development goals
Special Eurobarometer 352

Culture and mental health in Haiti : a literature review

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2010

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"This paper reviews and summarizes the available literature on Haitian mental health and Mental health services. This review was conducted in light of the Haitian earthquake in January 2010. The first part of the review describes historical, economic, sociological and anthropological factors essential to basic understanding of Haiti and its people. This includes discussion of demography, family structure, Haitian economics and religion. The second part of the review focuses on mental health and mental health services. This includes a review of factors such as basic epidemiology of mental illness, common beliefs about mental illness, explanatory models, idioms of distress, help-seeking behavior, configuration of mental health services and the relationship between religion and mental health"

Disability in the workplace : company practices

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE (ILO)
2010

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This paper is "a compilation of 25 company profiles, which describes how companies address hiring and retention, products and services and corporate social responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of disability. The publication is for companies, employers’ organizations and other representative business organizations, workers’ organizations, ILO staff, people with disabilities, and others interested in learning about company practices as it relates to disability. It is one of the first knowledge sharing initiatives of the ILO Global Business and Disability Network"
Working Paper No 3

World alzheimer report 2010 : the global economic impact of dementia

WIMO, Anders
PRINCE, Martin
2010

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This report provides a global picture of the economic impact of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. "The report includes an estimate of the worldwide cost of dementia, including direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs and costs of informal (family) care. The estimates are broken down by world region and include analysis of the differences between low and high income countries. The report also contains important policy recommendations and makes clear to key decision-makers that doing nothing is not an option"

Impact of rehabilitation care on the social inclusion of people with disabilities in Togo : survey of 30 lower limb amputees

TUBLU, Yawovi
et al
2009

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This report details a study on the impact of health-related rehabilitation as a contributor to social inclusion for people with disabilities in Togo. It uses the 'disability creation process', a model which represents disability as a dynamic and complex process whereby an individual’s impairments alone do not define his/her disability, as a conceptual basis in the West African context. Through analysing the rehabilitation services provided with regard to their effects on the beneficiaries, the study highlights social obstacles and facilitators faced by people with disabilities. This resource would be useful for organisations and practitioners interested in the impact of health-related rehabilitation as a contributor to social inclusion for people with disabilities in Togo

Guidelines: Incentives for health professionals

WELLER, Bridget
2008

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Staff costs dominate health services expenditure and ongoing shortages in the availability of health professionals present a real and direct threat to the continued delivery and development of health care services. Incentives, both financial and non-financial, provide one tool that governments and other employer bodies can use to develop and sustain a workforce with the skills and experience to deliver the required care. Financial incentives (wages and conditions, performance-linked payments and others) and nonfinancial incentives (career and professional development, workload management, flexible working arrangements, positive working arrangements and access to benefits and supports) are both discussed. The characteristics of an effective incentive scheme and the development of an incentive package are described. 

Graduating the poorest into microfinance : linking safety nets and financial services

HASHEMI, Syed
ROSENBERG, Richard
February 2006

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This note presents general microfinance information and explores issues surrounding the debate about whether or not microfinance actually reaches the poorest at the bottom of the socioeconomic scale. Links between safety net programmes and microfinance programmes are highlighted through case studies. This note is useful for people interested in microfinance issues in developing countries

Our common interest : report of the Commission for Africa

COMMISSION FOR AFRICA
March 2005

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This wide-ranging report was produced by the Commission For Africa, assembled by British Prime Minister Tony Blair in 2004 to define the challenges facing Africa, and to provide clear recommendations on how to support the changes needed to reduce poverty. The report is in two parts. The first, The Argument, addresses itself to a wider audience and sets out the Commission's call to action. The second part, The Analysis and Evidence, lays out the substance and basis of the recommendations. Recommendations are set out between these two sections. Topics covered include governance, peace and security, social issues such as education, health and vulnerability, and economic growth and development

Financial sustainability in rehabilitation centers: booklet 1, factors and players of financial sustainability. (La pérennité financière des centres de réadaptation fonctionnelle : fascicule 1, Les facteurs et ateliers de la pérennité financière)

ROUFFE, Frederique
et al
January 2005

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The purpose of this document is to facilitate the identification of factors contributing to financial sustainability, of key-players of financial sustainability and of internal tools related to financial and economic issues related to rehabilitation centres. Financial sustainability relies on precise knowledge of functioning costs. The differences in the context and constraints of rehabilitation centres is highlighted. Topics discussed include systems of health financing, possible sponsors of rehabilitation centres (including international donors, international and local associations, the state, hospitals), social security and recovery of costs by user fees

Progress of the world’s women 2005: women, work and poverty

CHEN, Martha
et al
2005

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This report argues that unless governments and policymakers pay more attention to employment, and its links to poverty, the campaign to make poverty history will not succeed, and the hope for gender equality will founder on the reality of women’s growing economic insecurity. It makes the case for an increased focus on women’s informal employment as a key pathway to reducing poverty and strengthening women’s economic security. It provides the latest available data on the size and composition of the informal economy and compares national data on average earnings and poverty risk across different segments of the informal and formal workforces in six developing countries and one developed country to show the links between employment, gender and poverty. It looks at the costs and benefits of informal work and their consequences for women’s economic security. Finally, it provides a strategic framework for how to promote decent work for women informal workers, and shows why strong organisations of workers in the informal economy are vital to effective policy reforms

Financial sustainability in rehabilitation centers: booklet 2, calculating functioning costs of rehabilitation centres. (La pérennité financière des centres de réadaptation fonctionnelle : fascicule 2, Calculs des coûts des centres de réadaptation)

ROUFFE, Frederick
et al
2005

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Before presenting accounting tools developed within the frame of HI or partners’ projects, basic accounting concepts (production costs, direct/indirect cost, etc.) are presented, so that a non-specialist can understand the scope of the different tools. The second part presents tools that enable calculation of the costs associated with a rehabilitation centre.  The last part presents two kinds of tools that complement the first parts: provisional budget management methods and a database enabling stock monitoring

Women with disabilities: accessing trade

STIENSTRA, Deborah
et al
July 2004

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This resource examines how trade policy and the cost of health services and products further economically marginalize women with disabilities. The authors outline how a similar phenomenon leads to lack of access due to higher costs of goods that are imported from the US. This resource also includes a set of recommendations for government and private sector organisations. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in women's rights, disability and trade issues

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