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Immunization in practice : a guide for health workers

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2004

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Contents: Module 1. Target diseases -- module 2. The vaccines -- module 3. The cold chain -- module 4. Ensuring safe injections -- module 5. Planning immunization session to reach every infant -- module 6. Holding an immunization session -- module 7. Monitoring and using you data -- module 8. Building community support for immunization

Hepatitis B vaccine introduction : lessons learned in advocacy, communication, and training

WITTLETT, Scott
January 2001

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Hepatitis B is especially dangerous for infants, since they may carry the infection for the rest of their lives without knowing it. Chronic carriers can infect others and are at risk of serious liver disease in later life. However, the hepatitis B vaccine, if provided, helps protect infants against these problems. The vaccine's introduction to developing countries only began in the late 1980s, but many countries still cannot afford to administer the vaccine to all children. This paper summarises the lessons learned about effective advocacy with decision makers, communication with parents and caretakers, and training health staff regarding hepatitis B, gained from over ten years of experience introducing hepatitis B vaccine worldwide. It also includes the WHO 'aide-memoire' on hepatitis B

Benchmark surveys on childhood immunization in Thailand, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Tanzania

PRINCETON SURVEY RESEARCH ASSOCIATES (PSRA)
1999

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Far fewer children than in the past are threatened by polio, diphtheria and measles thanks to the administration of basic vaccines through national immunization programmes. Nonetheless, a new generation of vaccines targeting other illnesses has not been as widely embraced. To begin to address this problem, surveys were undertaken of health care professionals, primarily pediatricians and general practitioners, and non-health care professionals, including health policy planners in the ministries of health and finance, officers at NGOs dealing with health issues, journalists who cover health care, academics and religious leaders, in Africa and Asia. This research was undertaken in order to develop a basic model of the decision making process that health professionals employ when considering whether to add vaccines to their national immunization programmes. This paper documents the findings of this exercise, and probes health workers' attitudes toward new vaccines in general, and toward the vaccines for Hib and rotavirus specifically

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