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Seeing the invisible: Sexuality-related knowledge, attitudes and behavior of children and youth with disabilities in China

SHANGHAI INSITITUTE OF PLANNED PARENTHOOD RESEARCH (SIPPR)
UNESCO
HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
2019

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Young people with disabilities have the same right to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) as their peers without disabilities, but their needs and rights are often overlooked. This study examines the SRH status of young people with disabilities in China. In particular, the study explored the sexuality-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of young people with disabilities as well as their access to sexuality-related information, education and services. The findings of the study are intended to provide evidence to support decision-making by government agencies, educators, development workers and other relevant stakeholders regarding developing and implementing disability-inclusive SRH and sexuality education policies and programmes for young people in China.

The study, using quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted in 2015 among unmarried young persons aged 12 to 24 living with visual, hearing, physical and intellectual disabilities, in both urban and rural areas. The analysis was based on data collected through 707 completed valid questionnaires, 20 group interviews and 35 individual interviews with young people with disabilities, and individual interviews with 60 parents and teachers, along with one case study.

Strengthening participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy

SIMMONS, Dr. Catharine
ROBINSON, Dr. Sally
October 2014

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Participation by children and young people in advocacy and change-making can not only improve and foster positive change in their own lives, but also influence the lives of others. When young people’s participation is supported, meaningful and engaged, multiple benefits accrue; their perspectives and experiences bring a unique contribution and can result in rights-based empowerment, enacted citizenship and improved relationships. This has the potential to shape policy, to increase the relevance and responsiveness of organisations they use, and to influence change in their communities in positive ways

 

However, there are significant issues and a range of barriers that discourage, prevent or actively exclude children and young people with disability from participating. A culture of low expectations, social and cultural barriers, relationship and identity difficulties and practical hurdles exist for many young people. As a result, many are precluded from participation, particularly around change-making activities

 

This paper examines how meaningful participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy and change-making can be strengthened. In the paper CDA calls for the promotion of children and young people’s participation as active and valued community members

 

This paper is also available at https://www.cyda.org.au/cda-issue-papers

 

Issue Papers

Situation analysis of youth (health) centres in Tanzania

DETSCHER, Susanne
September 2004

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This study was done to seek best practices in sexual and reproductive health education, by comparing youth (health) centres with different approaches around the country. The average age of visitors was 20.3, and over 2/3 came every day. There are a variety of activities (sport, cultural, information, education and communication (IEC), vocational and health training), and most centres are run by volunteers. Some of the health facilities are not well attended because of poor resources. Most centres are not self sustaining, and those that attempt to be tend to lose sight of their purpose. Young people felt they should have greater ownership of the centres. It was concluded that the ideal youth centre is a resource centre run by young people, with the involvement of the community, youth work specialists, volunteers and youth friendly health care providers, where youth-relevant information, a range of leisure and IEC activities, and counselling is available, as well as opportunities to develop personal skills. However, offering professional health services in Youth centres is most probably not cost-effective, mostly due to low numbers of actual clients

Knowledge, personal risk and experiences of HIV/AIDS among people with disabilities in Swaziland

YOUSAFZAI, Aisha K
et al
September 2004

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"The aim of this study was to explore whether disabled and non-disabled young adults in Swaziland have similar perceptions of HIV/AIDS similarly. A qualitative study using focus-group discussions was conducted. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 56 non-disabled adults (aged 16-29 years) and four focus groups were conducted with a total of 32 adults with either a physical or hearing disability (aged 18-32 years). The focus-group schedule explored knowledge about HIV/AIDS, personal risk and experiences of health-seeking practices. Information and awareness about HIV/AIDS was good in both rural and urban areas among the non-disabled participants, who obtained their information from a wide range of sources. In contrast, participants with disability, who obtained information about HIV/AIDS from a limited range of sources, lacked knowledge about HIV/AIDS and were misinformed about modes of transmission...Further research is necessary to enable HIV/AIDS programmes to address the specific needs of people with disabilities"
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, Vol 27, Issue 3

Handbook on paediatric AIDS in Africa

TINDYEBWA, Denis
et al
2004

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This handbook intends to provide users in resource-poor countries with a tool that can be adapted to their needs. It follows the four principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and aims to provide a simple, accessible and practical handbook for health workers involved in preventing infection and caring for children infected and affected by HIV. It includes substantial chapters on caring for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, infants and orphans; diagnosis and the clinical stages of HIV infection; clinical conditions associated with HIV (diarrhoea, malnutrition, neurological manifestations, skin manifestations and more); pulmonary conditions; anti-retroviral therapy for children; youth issues, long-term and terminal care planning; psychosocial support. The primary targets are medical students and their lecturers, nurses, clinicians, community health workers and other service providers in resource poor settings where there is a significant HIV and AIDS burden

Making commitments matter : a toolkit for young people to evaluate national youth policy

UNITED NATIONS. Division for Social Policy and Development
2004

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This toolkit is meant for national youth organisations and/or representatives working with youth. It can be used as a tool to assess a country's progress in reaching the World Programme of Action on Youth (WPAY) goals; prioritise an organisation's work, and based on findings initiate actions at the national level. It should be used as a starting point for determining what has been done to better the lives of young people since 1995 in their community. In addition to providing methods for evaluating this progress, the toolkit also contains concrete tools to further youth work

Guide to WHO documents concerning adolescent health and development

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development
2002

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Bibliography of WHO documents relating to adolescent health and development. It is divided into four sections which follow the logical programming steps: building political commitment, assessing priorities for action, maintaining implementation, and monitoring and evaluation

Portal Punto J

INSTITUTO PARA LA CONECTIVIDAD EN LAS AMÉRICAS
SAVE THE CHILDREN

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Punto J constitutes an excellent example of the potential of innovative approaches to health issues through the effective use of ICT tools, and the implementations of new mechanisms for youth-to-youth online education on issues of sexuality, sexual and reproductive health, and HIV/AIDS prevention

The world starts with me!

World Population Foundation (WPF)
Butterfly Works

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This is an online curriculum in sexual health and rights education, HIV and AIDS prevention, life and creative skills, for young East Africans. The programme is aimed at 12-19 year olds, both school going young people and early school leavers. It combines IT skills building and creative expression. It aims to contribute not only to the improvement of the sexual and reproductive health of young people, but also to their social and economic development

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