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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Going to scale with community-led total sanitation : reflections on experience, issues and ways forward

CHAMBERS, Robert
2009

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Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is a revolutionary approach in which communities are facilitated to conduct their own appraisal and analysis of open defecation and take their own action to become open defecation-free. This report presents CLTS approaches in six countries which differ organisationally with contrasting combinations of NGOs, projects and governments. Practical elements in strategies for going to scale have included: training and facilitating; starting in favourable conditions; conducting campaigns and encouraging competition; recruiting and committing teams and full-time facilitators and trainers; organising workshops and cross-visits; supporting and sponsoring Natural Leaders and community consultants and inspiring and empowering children

 

Practice Paper, Vol 2009, No 1

Conducting quality impact evaluation under budget, time and data constraints

THE WORLD BANK‘S INDEPENDENT EVALUATION GROUP
2006

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“Project and program managers who wish to conduct an evaluation are often faced with severe budget, time or data constraints — these can act as a disincentive to conduct rigorous evaluations. The purpose of this booklet is to provide advice to those planning an impact evaluation, so that they can select the most rigorous methods available within the constraints they face”

Breaking barriers : building access for disabled people [whole issue]

WIRZ, Sheila
MEIKLE, Sheilah
Eds
May 2005

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This issue of id21 insights looks at barriers to disabled peoples' access to the physical environment, how they constrain economic and social opportunities and the importance of working with disabled people to dismantle them. The contributors also present good practices in a range of infrastructures, including transport, communication technologies and sanitation, that serve as examples of how disabled access can improve in developing countries. Articles include: Training Ethiopia's blind people in ICTs; Accessible water supply and sanitation; Creating disabled-friendly environments in Sri Lanka; Better access to public transport; Campaigning for access in Viet Nam; Including disabled people effectively in post-Tsunami planning

Water and sanitation for disabled people and other vulnerable groups : designing services to improve accessibility

JONES, Hazel
REED, Bob
2005

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This book is aimed at water and sanitation planners and service providers as well as organisations of and for disabled people. It aims to promote the equitable access to water and sanitation facilities for disabled people. The main focus of the book is the development of facilities for families in rural and peri-urban areas of low- and middle-income countries, but many of the approaches and solutions may also be applied in institutional settings, such as schools and hospitals and in emergency situations. The contents include a rationale for improving accessibility; guidance on inter-sectoral communication and collaboration; guidance on making service delivery approaches inclusive; simple low-cost technical solutions for inclusive design; developing strategies for implementation; and case studies illustrating solutions and their benefits to disabled people.

L'alimentation en eau et les installations sanitaires : pour les personnes handicapees - et autres groupes vulnerables

JONES, Hazel
REED, Bob
Eds
2005

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This book is aimed at water and sanitation planners and service providers as well as organisations of and for disabled people. It aims to promote the equitable access to water and sanitation facilities for disabled people. The main focus of the book is the development of facilities for families in rural and peri-urban areas of low- and middle-income countries, but many of the approaches and solutions may also be applied in institutional settings, such as schools and hospitals and in emergency situations. The contents include a rationale for improving accessibility; guidance on inter-sectoral communication and collaboration; guidance on making service delivery approaches inclusive; simple low-cost technical solutions for inclusive design; developing strategies for implementation; and case studies illustrating solutions and their benefits to disabled people

Water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people : revised inception report

JONES, Hazel
REED, R
July 2003

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This report was produced at the end of phase 1 of the Knowledge and Research project : water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people. The findings of phase 1 are built upon to produce this inception report for phase 2 of the project. The report describes phase 1 of the project and its findings. It summarises the implications of these findings and the key issues to be addressed in phase 2 of the project. It gives the project logical framework, workplan, and Output ot Purpose summary report

Water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people : e-conference synthesis report

LEWIS, Ingrid
REED, R.
JONES, Hazel
Eds
October 2002

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The aim of this e-conference was to provide a forum for sharing information, experience and views on issues related to disabled people's access to and use of water and sanitation facilities. The report looks at barriers to accessible water and sanitation facilities; strategies to improve accessibility; and tools to support improvement in access. It is useful for CBR projects, governments, and planners

Health and environment library modules

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
1997

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This package consists of two components: key documents from international agencies on environmental health and water and sanitation issues; and a set of tools to manage this information, including a list of bibliographical references, and an electronic version of this material accessble in CARDBOX, as text files, or in a MICRO-ISIS compatible format.
Contents: Introduction (WHO/EHG/97.2/INT) -- Environmental health : general issues WHO/EHG/97.2/GEN) -- Environmental epidemiology (WHO/EHG/97.2/EPI) -- Ionizing radiation (WHO/EHG/97.2/ION) -- Annex (WHO/EHG/97.2/annex) -- Food safety (WHO/EHG/97.2/FOOD, 2nd rev. ed.) -- Vector control (WHO/EHG/97.2/VEC, 2nd rev. ed.) -- Water quality, water supply and sanitation (WHO/EHG/97.2/WAT, 2nd rev. ed.)

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Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

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