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An integrated approach to victim assistance in Cambodia & the role of Australia as supporting state

De BEAUPUIS, Gaetan
HOTTENOT, Elke
November 2018

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The objective of this case study was to review how Cambodia, as an affected state, and Australia as a donor, promote the provision of victim assistance in sectors including health, rehabilitation, disability, socio-economic development and poverty reduction. It documents promising practices and proposes next steps to ensure the sustainability of victim assistance provision in the near and long-term future. This study aims to inspire the mine action community in both affected and donor states to increase its contribution to victim assistance. This case study focuses on both prongs of the integrated approach to victim assistance by describing: i) Broader multi-sector efforts that reach casualties, survivors and indirect victims; and ii) Specific victim assistance efforts to improve victims’ quality of life deployed by mine action stakeholders, other actors in charge of coordinating victim assistance in Cambodia, and Australia as a donor state. An analysis of these specific efforts revealed that they fall into one of two of the following categories: a) Bridging gaps in data collection and service provision, or b) Advocating for, and facilitating, a multisector response.

 

Humanity & Inclusion (HI) and the Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority (CMAA) conducted the study in November 2017 in seven provinces. The methodology comprised three steps: a desk review of project documents, national plans and policies from a range of sectors with a focus on programmes funded by Australia; interviews with key personnel from the mine action and the disability sectors; and a field survey comprising 31 individual indepth interviews with 19 survivors and 12 other persons with disabilities (23 male and 8 female), 12 focus group discussions as well as field visits to observe the initiatives described in this publication. 

 

 

Creating an enabling environment for the advancement of women and girls : a briefing paper to the United Nations commission on the status of women at its 50th session

HOFFMAN HANCHETT, Ruthi
BRANDT, Don
SOJWAL, Sanjay
March 2006

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This briefing paper contains reports and recommendations, from World Vision's gender and development, relief, and advocacy experts in the Sudan, Uganda, Ethiopia, United Kingdom, Guatemala, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India, and the former states of the Soviet Union. They focus on the challenges and promising practices for the advancement of women and girls in the areas of education, health, work, and those trapped in situations of violence

Landmine monitor report 2004 : toward a mine-free world

INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO BAN LANDMINES
2004

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Landmine Monitor is not a technical verification system or a formal inspection regime. It is an attempt by civil society to hold governments accountable to the obligations they have taken on with respect to antipersonnel mines. The monitor is designed to complement the States Parties transparency reporting required under Article 7 of the Mine Ban Treaty.
Landmine Monitor Report 2004 contains information on every country in the world with respect to landmine ban policy, use, production, transfer, stockpiling, mine action funding, mine clearance, mine risk education, landmine casualties, and survivor assistance. It does not only report on States Parties and their treaty obligations, but looks at signatory states and non-signatories as well. Appendices with information from key players in mine action, such as UN agencies and the International Committee of the Red Cross, are also included.
Landmine Monitor and its annual reports aim to promote and advance discussion on mine-related issues, and to seek clarifications, in order to help reach the goal of a mine-free world. Landmine Monitor works in good faith to provide factual information about issues it is monitoring, in order to benefit the international community as a whole

Landmine monitor report 2003 : toward a mine-free world - executive summary

INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO BAN LANDMINES
2003

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The summary of the fith Landmine Monitor Report collects information and assesses the response by the international community to the global landmine crisis. The different sections of the summary give information about the international ban of landmines, humanitarian mine action, assistance to survivors of landmines, funding of mine action and regional overviews.

Explosive remnants of war : ERW in Sri Lanka

CAVE, Rosy
2003

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This resource examines the type of munitions that comprise ERW (unexploded remnants) in Sri Lanka and the short- and long-term impact on the lives of individuals and communities. The aim is to advocate against the use by presenting the humanitarian and economic risks

From many lands

NARAYAN, Deepa
PETESCH, Patti
Eds
2002

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This book presents the experiences of people who are worn down by persistent deprivation, and buffeted by severe shocks they feel ill-equipped to overcome. The stories reveal some of the reasons why poor people remain poor, despite working long hours day after day. They document the frequently demeaning encounters with state, market and civic institutions that distort the well-intended political, economic and social policies. This book focuses on the diversity of poverty in 14 countries and highlights the key findings

War : the impact on minority and indigenous children. Bangladesh - the Chittagong Hill tracts

MINORITY RIGHTS GROUP INTERNATIONAL
Ed

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This document is produced by Minority Rights Group International. It is primarily about the effect of war on children from the indigenous communities in Bangladesh in the Chittagong Hill tracts. Although it reports on children of all ages up to 18, the issues it outlines impact children in the 0-8 age group just as much. These are: physical injury and death; witnessing of atrocities; separation from parents and community; lost access to health care, education and housing; eviction and forced population transfer; life as refugees and displaced persons; destruction of villages, crops and wells and neglect during humanitarian relief and reconstruction programmes. The article also gives an account of international law and the conventions and declarations which aim to protect indigenous communities in conflict situations

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