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Insights from ASEAN hometown improvement project: Towards improved practice

Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD)
2019

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The ASEAN Hometown Improvement Project, aimed to tackle challenges emerging from urbanization and the rise of the ageing population in the ASEAN region by attempting timely and relevant improvements to disability inclusive ‘hometowns’. 

 

Three approaches were utilized:

1) Promotion of an inclusive business through capacity building of persons with disabilities

2) Promotion of accessibility features in the community and other public places, as well as to information, communication, and transportation

3) Promotion of cooperation with government sector via discussions to find solutions to improve the livelihood of persons with disabilities

 

The sections, arranged per country in alphabetical order, contain the following: Hometown Improvement Project description and backgrounder; Capacity Building Workshop details; Key Partners and Stakeholders; Training Results; Challenges; Framework for Good Practice; and Way Forward and include:

  • Cambodia: Phnom Penh Center for Independent Living's Bakery by Persons with Disabilities
  • Indonesia: Batik Design and Marketing Management at Kampung Peduli
  • Malaysia: Branding and Marketing Management for Bakery and Handicraft by Persons with Disabilities at CBR Semenyih
  • Myanmar: Mushroom Production by Persons with Disabilities with Shwe Minn Tha Foundation
  • Phillipines: Sustainable Inclusive Urban Micro-Gardening and Community-Based Cooperative at Barangay 177
  • Thailand: Earthworm Casting and Cactus Farming at Farm D
  • Vietnam: Fermented Dry Bamboo Waste Fertilizer at Bamboo Dana Co. Ltd

 

 

Making cities inclusive: safe mobility for persons with disabilities in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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A policy brief concerning safe and inclusive urban mobility is presented. Safe and inclusive mobility is not currently a universally recognised concept in international human rights instruments and development framework. The relationship of various global legal & policy frameworks with safe and inclusive urban mobility is discussed including:

  • The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
  • The 2030 Sustainable Development Goals
  • The New Urban Agenda
  • The UN Road Safety Decade of Action

Recommendations for improved policies and actions are made:

  • Recommendation 1: Recognise safe and inclusive mobility as a transversal issue for realising the Sustainable Development Goals and human rights
  • Recommendation 2: Agree strong political and financial commitments to improve the safety of roads with a focus on vulnerable road users
  • Recommendation 3: Provide safe and accessible urban mobility infrastructures applying universal design approach, all along the mobility chain
  • Recommendation 4: Enhance participatory and evidence-based policy-making for a better governance of road safety, mobility management and urban planning

Inclusive urban mobility and road safety in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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Between 20 to 50 million people worldwide suffer non-fatal injuries in road crashes every year; around 1.25 million are killed. Unsafe roads also represent a major factor of social exclusion, especially for ‘vulnerable road users’. These include notably pedestrians, persons with disabilities, cyclists and children. They represent 46% of road casualties. Persons with disabilities are at higher risk of sustaining injuries from road crashes.

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility and road safety challenges discussed include: safe crossing points over roads; signage and information; collective transport (particularly buses); road design and layout, poor road markings or signposts and the lack of street lighting.

 

Case histories provided are: Engaging government and DPOs to improve safe and inclusive mobility in Burkina Faso; and  Data, road safety and urban mobility in Vientiane, Laos

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings: 

1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility action, based on evidence and through participative processes

2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Inclusive urban mobility and getting to school safely in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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For teenagers in developing countries, there is no greater threat to life than road traffic crashes: road crashes are the leading cause of preventable death of youth aged 15 to 29 years, and the second cause for those aged 5 to 14 years.(6) The risks are even higher for children with disabilities, who are also more exposed to non-fatal injuries from road crashes.

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility and road safety challenges discussed include: safe crossing points over roads and collective transport (particularly buses). 

 

Two case studies are provided: Safer access to school for disabled students in Kenya; and School access and pedestrian safety improvements in Democratic Republic of Congo

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings:

  • 1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility, based on evidence and through participative processes
  • 2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Inclusive urban mobility and getting to work safely in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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The lack of safe and accessible roads in many cities in developing countries impacts negatively on employment opportunities for persons with disabilities. Between 20 to 50 million people worldwide suffer non-fatal injuries in road crashes every year; around 1.25 million are killed. Unsafe roads also represent a major factor of social exclusion, especially for ‘vulnerable road users’. These include notably pedestrians, persons with disabilities, cyclists and children. They represent 46% of road casualties. Persons with disabilities are at higher risk of sustaining injuries from road crashes.

 

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility and road safety challenges discussed include: safe crossing points over roads; signage and information; collective transport (particularly buses); accessing buildings such as offices or retail and driving with a disability.

 

Case histories provided are: Accessible transport as part of an inclusive jobs program in Senegal; and Modified vehicles and driving licenses for drivers with disabilities in Vietnam

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings: 

1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility action, based on evidence and through participative processes

2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Inclusive and safe urban mobility and Disaster Risk Management in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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Disabled people are disproportionately affected by disasters owing to mobility difficulties in evacuation, lack of access to information or services and discrimination. When disasters occur, constraining external factors, such as unsafe roads and lack of accessible pedestrian and transport routes, create additional difficulties for coping with the situation. Developing cities vulnerable to disasters also are likely to have a greater proportion of the population with a disability, due to past injuries.

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility challenges relating to disasters discussed include: inaccessible disaster shelters, inaccessible means of evacuation and lack of information.

 

Case histories provided are: Building back better in Haiti; a focus on inclusive access and mobility; and Improving universal accessibility in Kathmandu, Nepal

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings: 

1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility action, based on evidence and through participative processes

2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Promoting rights of people with disabilities in Indonesia (UN Partnership to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities / UNPRPD) - Special edition, ILO Jakarta newsletter

ILO Jakarta
February 2018

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One of the first implementing countries of the UNPRPD was Indonesia. In Indonesia the project was jointly implemented between the ILO, WHO and UNESCO, in partnership with the national entities such as the Association of Indonesian Municipalities (APEKSI) and various disability rights non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

 

The newsletter has items on: 

  • Towards inclusive cities - Fourteen mayors across Indonesia signed the Charter of the Network of Indonesian Mayors for Inclusive Cities in Indonesia during the UN-sponsored High-Level Meeting of Mayors for Inclusive Cities
  • Towards inclusive employment - Mojokerto city in East Java is the first city in the country to conduct an inclusive job fair at the district level. The first two-day inclusive job fair was organized in 2014 and it has become an annual event
  • Employment assessments for people iwth disabilities - In collaboration with the University of Indonesia, the ILO conducted a study on Mapping Persons with Disabilities in Indonesia. The study reveals that there is an urgent need to increase the labour-force participation of people with disabilities
  • Rapid Assessment on Employment for Persons with Disabilities

 

Ensuring universal access to eye health in urban slums in the Global South: the case of Bhopal (India).

PREGEL, Andrea
et al
October 2017

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In the context of its Urban Eye Health Programme in Bhopal (India), Sightsavers launched a pilot approach aimed at developing an Inclusive Eye Health (IEH) model and IEH Minimum Standards.

Accessibility audits were conducted in a tertiary eye hospital and four primary vision centres located within urban slums, addressing the accessibility of physical infrastructures, communication and service provision. The collection and analysis of disaggregated data inform the inclusion strategy and provide a baseline to measure the impact of service provision. Trainings of eye health staff and sensitisation of decision makers on accessibility, universal design, disability and gender inclusion are organised on a regular basis.

A referral network is being built to ensure participation of women, people with disabilities and other marginalised groups, explore barriers at demand level, and guarantee wider access to eye care in the community. Finally, advocacy interventions will be developed to raise awareness in the community and mainstream disability and gender inclusion within the public health sector.

Enabling inclusive cities - Tool kit for inclusive urban development

LINDFIELD, Michael
SINGRU, Ramola Naik
2017

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This Inclusive Cities Tool Kit presents an integrated approach to inclusive urban development (IUD).

 

This tool kit presents concepts and strategies for addressing technical and institutional challenges related to shelter, infrastructure, transport, climate change, and disaster risk management. Chapter 1 presents an IUD framework that sets out the underlying principles of accessibility, affordability, resilience, and sustainability for an integrated approach to IUD investments. It outlines the process for undertaking an inclusive urban assessment. Chapter 2 sets out a toolbox that includes assessment methodologies, implementation tool kits, and other resources for each step in the process. The tools are designed to mesh across three phases of the development of an inclusive urban redevelopment project—the initial data gathering, the assessment and options development, and the prioritization of preferred options.

 

This tool kit has been prepared for ADB staff and other stakeholders to engage in IUD programming and implementation as an integral component of the ADB lending programs in DMCs. It is a guide to assist staff in supporting city governments in DMCs to prepare and implement IUD plans. The tool kit is intended as a practical guide for mayors, local government officials, sector specialists, planners, and other decision makers involved in project programming and design of urban infrastructure projects in cities

Good practices of accessible urban development - Making urban environment inclusive and fully accessible to ALL

August 2016

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About 6.25 billion people, 15 per cent of them persons with disabilities, are expected to be living in urban centres by 2050. Urbanisation has the potential to be an engineer for achieving sustainable and inclusive development for all. The current lack of environmental accessibility faced by people with disabilities, in particular in many cities in the world, presents a major challenge. As the international community prepares for the Third Global Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III), which will take place in Quito, Ecuador, in October 2016, it is an apt and a strategic opportunity to promote an accessible and inclusive Urban Agenda.

This report is a compendium of promising initiatives and good practices that have emerged in recent yeas successfully promoting accessibility and inclusion of persons with disabilities, their rights, aspiration and contributions in the contexts of urban development. It countains findings and recommendations which were adopted at a UN expert group meeting, that may be helpful in informing the ongoing Habitat III discourses, the development of the New Urban Agenda as well as in furthering accessible and inclusive urban development 

Disability considerations for infrastructure programmes

AGARWAL, Anjlee
STEELE, Andre
March 2016

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This study identifies and summarises evidence of the impact of non-accessible infrastructure on people with disabilities. It makes recommendations on how to incorporate the principals of universal access into all infrastructure projects. This document should be read in combination with the DFID (UK Department for International Development)​ Disability Framework “Leaving No One behind” (2014), which sets out how DFID promotes inclusion of people living with disabilities in all its programmes. Topics covered include: rationale for inclusive infrastructure; best practices in project planning, engineering design; monitoring and evaluation processes; inclusive design in planning and policy; mainstreaming disability considerations into infrastructure programmes and policy decisions; linking disabilities with cross cutting agendas. 

The right to adequate housing for persons with disabilities living in cities

UNITED NATIONS HABITAT
2015

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“This study reviews the literature on the meaning and impact of the right to adequate housing for persons with disabilities in cities. It uses the foundational framework of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and demonstrates how the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) provides a new understanding of this complex right”

 

Adequate Housing Series

Strategy report on disaster risk management, reduction and response in Mongolia

JEGGLE, Terry
May 2013

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"The report summarizes the current Disaster Risk Management (DRM) situation in Mongolia and draws conclusions based on initial scoping assessments of the advisor. These observations underpin recommendations for further strategic policy and programme development in the country consistent with Government interests and through United Nations and wider international organizations’ involvement to strengthen the DRM and specifically disaster risk reduction (DRR) capacities of the institutional mechanisms, policies and regulatory frameworks in Mongolia. The author has based his analysis on present circumstances in the subject area since 2005, and it is projected from current conditions and suggested trends at the present time forward to anticipated needs and conditions up to 2020"

Stockholm : the city for everyone

CITY OF STOCKHOLM
2010

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This report provides a general overview of City of Stockholm’s easy access project to make its streets and squares and city-owned properties, accessible and serviceable to all. The programme aims to remove all accessibility barriers by 2030 This report is useful for anyone interested in urban accessibility

Global age-friendly cities : a guide

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2007

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Informed by WHO's approach to active ageing, the purpose of this guide is to engage cities to become more age-friendly so as to tap the potential that older people represent for humanity. An age-friendly city encourages active ageing by optimising opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance the quality of life of older people. Working with groups on 33 cities in all WHO regions, WHO asked older people in focus groups to describe the advantages and barriers they experience in 8 areas of city living. The results from these led to the development of a set of age-friendly city checklists

Social movements and chronic poverty across the urban-rural divide : concepts and experiences

MITLIN, Diana
BEBBINGTON, Anthony
September 2006

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"This paper develops a series of arguments regarding the contribution of social movements to the reduction of chronic poverty in both urban and rural social contexts...The summary is divided into three sections addressing: the relevance of social movements to the chronically poor; social movements and the representation of the chronically poor; and the interaction between the state and movements of the poor, with a special focus on the influence of social movements on policy and politics...[the] discussion suggests that the power of social movements lies less in their ability to influence the specifics of policies and programmes, and rather more in their capacity to change the terms in which societies debate poverty and social change, and to influence the types of development and policy alternatives that are considered legitimate in a given social and political context"

Non-formal education and livelihood skills for marginalized street and slum youth in Uganda

UGANDA YOUTH DEVELOPMENT LINK (UYDEL)
June 2006

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This report summarises a programme for marginalised youth that was implemented in one urban area (Kampala) and one rural area (Arua) of Uganda, with the ultimate goal of determining marketable livelihood skills while facilitating placement of marginalised youth in employment. By providing marginalised youth with new learning opportunities that nurture empowerment and socio-economic inclusion, the project contributed to breaking the cycle of marginalisation and vulnerabilities that impedes the development of out-of-schools youth. In this context, education on HIV and AIDS was an integral part of the project, which also involved the active participation of local artisans and employers during specific training and orientation sessions. 288 marginalised youth were placed in viable working situations. The process was effective in building self-esteem, equipping them to make informed decisions and resist negative peer pressure. Training methods revolved around three basic approaches: - learning by doing; - learning by producing, and - learning by earning

Child labour, gender inequality and rural/urban disparities : how can Ethiopia’s national development strategies be revised to address negative spill-over impacts on child education and wellbeing?

WOLDEHANNA, Tassew
et al
2005

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This paper is based on a study which sought to understand the impact on child labour and child schooling of public policy interventions formulated within the Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP), and how changes are mediated through gender and rural/urban differences

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