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Advocacy, communication and social mobilization to stop TB : a 10-year framework for action

ASCM SUBGROUP AT COUNTRY LEVEL
2006

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This workplan focuses on how advocacy, communication and social mobilitation can contribute to TB control policies and programmes. In particular, it aims to: provide guidance to national initiatives designed to implement the Global Plan TB 2006-2025; foster advocacy, communication and social mobilization capacity (ACSM); and encourage behavioural and social changes, tailored to specific local context, that will result in increased TB case detection and cure rates. A successful strategy will need to: develop national and sub-national ACSM capacity; build inclusion of patients and communities affected; ensure political commitment and accountability; build country-level ACSM partnerships; learn and build on good ACSM practices. This is key tool for policy makers, at national and local level, health authorities and organisations working with TB and health communication

Civil society perspectives on TB policy in Bangladesh, Brazil, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Thailand

Public Health Watch, Open Society Institute
2006

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This publication contains an overview of the common themes and funding resulting from five country reports, and the five reports themselves. The World Health Organization has designated all five as TB-high burden countries. The research findings show a low level of awareness about TB, and TB and HIV co-infection; about how TB is transmitted and how it can be cured; and about the link between poverty and TB; as well as low media coverage of TB and a lack of strong communication strategies for national TB programmes. It also contains country-specific recommendations

Civil society perspectives on TB/AIDS : highlights from a joint initiative to promote community-led advocacy

OPEN SOCIETY INSTITUTE
TREATMENT ACTION GROUP
2006

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This publication presents six case studies of community-led advocacy activities, aimed at enhancing the capacity of the community to participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of TB/HIV programmes. The HIV epidemic has significantly contributed to the rise of TB incidence, but disease control programmes and policies are generally designed to be implemented independently, with limited resources often allocated to TB projects. The case studies outline some success stories of an integrated approach to TB and HIV, the TB/HIV Advocacy Grants Project, and highlight examples of effective community mobilisation and inclusion of people with HIV. This is a valuable resource for policy makers, organisations and practitioners working in HIV and tuberculosis

HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria : the status and impact of the three diseases

GLOBAL FUND TO FIGHT AIDS, TUBERCOLOSIS AND MALARIA
2005

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This is a publication produced by the Global Fund in collaboration with the Roll Back Malaria, Stop TB and HIV Departments of the World Health Organization, and UNAIDS. It looks at the human and economic impact of three major infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, and identifies a reciprocal cause-effect relationship between poverty and disease. In resource-constraint countries, this has a devastating impact on the health systems, and on the most vulnerable sections of society, namely women and children. The document calls for sustained commitment and funding on the part of the government, the private sector and NGOs

Addressing HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria : the resource needs of the Global Fund 2005-2007

GLOBAL FUND TO FIGHT AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS AND MALARIA
2005

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This publication has been produced by the Global Fund in collaboration with the World Health Organization, the STB and RBM Partnerships, and UNAIDS. It contains an assessment on the 2005-2007 resource need of the Global Fund. The Fund aims at helping reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria through a public-private foundation. This report provides a comprehensive estimation of the global needs for these three devastating diseases and identifies the Global Fund's share of global need. For the year 2007 the Global Fund total contribution to international resources will reach 27%

Investing in the future : the Global Fund at three years

GLOBAL FUND TO FIGHT AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS AND MALARIA
2005

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The purpose of the Global Fund is to finance programs designed to reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria through a system of performance-based grants. This document assesses the first three years of activity. It points out that Global Fund financing has reached tens millions of people through a wide range of prevention programmes. It has contributed to the scaling up of ARV treatment, providing access to the drugs for 130,000 people. Significant results have also been obtained in the fight against tuberculosis, while distribution of insecticide-treated mosquito nets has been disappointing. The report provides detailed information, particularly useful for health and development organizations willing to apply for grants

Replenishing the Global Fund : an indipendent assessment

BEZANSON, Keith A
2005

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This document is an attempt to make a case for the Global Fund, and support the Voluntary Replenishment Mechanism for the Fund, in the face of increasing fiscal constraints and competing demands. It explains the purpose and unique aims of the Fund, and spells out its main achievements to date. A further section compares different strategies and replenishment models on which donors may decide to negotiate

Palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa : an appraisal

HARDING, Richard
HIGGINSON, Irene
2004

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This report was written from the belief that palliative care is, and will be for the forseeable future, an essential component in the continuum of managing HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. There is now a wealth of experience in sub-Saharan Africa about the ways in which palliative care can be delivered both affordably and effectively. However, there remains a lack of properly documented evidence and research to demonstrate the importance of this work and promote its development. This report provides a review of existing evaluations of palliative care projects in sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on isolating the factors that lead to sustainability, local ownership and scaling up; the role of palliative care in the management of HIV/AIDS and how to integrate palliative care and Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART); primary health based care projects in two countries, Kenya and Malawi, that could provide lessons for the implementation of palliative care; lessons from other parallel programmes which mirror palliative care delivery, for example, tuberculosis programmes, and primary care programmes with good links to local clinics and hospitals, and community mobilization and empowerment projects linked to health facilities. In this way it contributes to the effort of providing an evidence base to demonstrate the importance of palliative care and provides a source of reference for policy makers, practitioners, donors and researchers

Interim policy on collaborative TB/HIV issues

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Stop TB Department and Department of HIV/AIDS
2004

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This policy responds to a demand from countries for immediate guidance on which collaborative TB/HIV activities to implement and under what circumstances. It is complementary to and in synergy with the established core activities of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes. Implementing the DOTS strategy is the core activity for tuberculosis control. Similarly, infection and disease prevention and health promotion activities and the provision of treatment and care form the basis for HIV/AIDS control. This policy does not call for the institution of a new specialist or independent disease control programme. It rather promotes enhanced collaboration between tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS programmes in the provision of a continuum of quality care at service-delivery level for people with, or at risk of tuberculosis and people living with HIV/AIDS

Handbook on paediatric AIDS in Africa

TINDYEBWA, Denis
et al
2004

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This handbook intends to provide users in resource-poor countries with a tool that can be adapted to their needs. It follows the four principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and aims to provide a simple, accessible and practical handbook for health workers involved in preventing infection and caring for children infected and affected by HIV. It includes substantial chapters on caring for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, infants and orphans; diagnosis and the clinical stages of HIV infection; clinical conditions associated with HIV (diarrhoea, malnutrition, neurological manifestations, skin manifestations and more); pulmonary conditions; anti-retroviral therapy for children; youth issues, long-term and terminal care planning; psychosocial support. The primary targets are medical students and their lecturers, nurses, clinicians, community health workers and other service providers in resource poor settings where there is a significant HIV and AIDS burden

Community participation and tropical disease control in resource-poor settings

ESPINO, Fe
KOOPS, Vaughn
MANDERSON, Lenore
2004

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This document outlines the historical evolution of ideas and practices of community participation in the context of tropical diseases. It shows the extent to which community involvement contributes to the control of main tropical diseases, including malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, dengue fever and schistomasiasis. The review finds that 'community participation' remains a guiding principle in tropical disease control, but its future success is dependent on sustained and continuous collaboration between external agencies, government and communities

Using knowledge management to make health systems work

BAILEY, Christopher
December 2003

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The discipline of knowledge management aims to bridge the gap between information availability and its communication in areas where the it is needed most. This editorial looks at two programmes that demonstrate how knowledge management can work

The compliance service uses SMS technology for TB treatment

BRIDGES.ORG
2003

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A comprehensive case study on the use of the Short Message Service (SMS) to alert tuberculosis (TB) patients to take their medication. The initiative has led to a significant increase in the recovery rate of patients and could lead to savings for healthcare authorities

South African health review 2002

Health Systems Trust (HST)
2003

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This is a comprehensive, authoritative and independent review of the South African health system. It is published annually and the theme of this year's edition is the restructuring of the health care system: progress to date. It is made up of 21 chapters grouped into four themes: framework for transformation, human resources, priority programmes and support systems. The review acts as a barometer for assessing the transformation processes and their impact on provision of equitable health care to all in South Africa

Global Fund update for NGOs and civil society

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF AIDS SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS (ICASO)
June 2002

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An update of the work of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, designed to keep NGOs and civil society abreast of Fund's grant-giving trends, issues and statistics. It summarises the results of the first round of funding, and provides information about the second; presents articles on the experiences of NGOs with Country Coordinating Mechanisms (CCMs); and provides a report on the contrubtions made to the Global Fund, and the need to increase these

Availability of anti-TB drugs in medical shops : a study in six RNTCP districts of Orissa

ASIAN INFORMATION MARKETING ANS SOCIAL RESEARCH
2002

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This report describes a research project, which aimed to identify the medical shops selling anti-TB drugs, the various brands of medicines available, the average sales of the drugs, whether or not these are sold with prescriptions, and the type of relationship between the medical shops and the health professionals (doctors) in the area. Data collection methods included a census of all medical shops, interviews with small samples of shopkeepers, stockists and medical representatives and patients being treated by private practitioners

Effectiveness of two gender sensitisation strategies in RNTCP : a comparative study in Orissa

INDIAN INSTITUTE OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT RESEARCH
2002

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This paper describes a research project which aimed to assess the relative effectiveness of two gender sensitisation strategies for health providers involved in the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP). The report analyses the two approaches in terms of their delivery of treatment and in terms of cost effectiveness. Its conclusions include: the need to emphasise poverty issues alongside gender issues and a suggestion to use mass media as well as targetted training. The report also calls for more longitudinal research

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