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Knowledge and perceptions of HIV-infected patients regarding HIV transmission and treatment in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Hoang, Dong
Dinh, An T
Groce, Nora
Sullivan, Lynn
March 2015

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Patient education concerning HIV and antiretroviral (ARV) medications is important for optimal outcomes. The authors assessed the knowledge and perceptions of HIV-infected patients in an ARV education program in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The study population’s knowledge of HIV/AIDS and ARV medications, perceived stigmatization, and areas of knowledge deficits underscore the need for effective patient education programs addressing poorly understood issues around HIV/AIDS.

Guidance on infant feeding and HIV in the context of refugees and displaced populations

LHOTSKA, Lida
MCGRATH, Marie
2008

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This Guidance on Infant feeding and HIV aims to assist in policy formation and decision-making strategies on infant feeding and HIV in refugees and displaced populations. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the current consensus on infant feeding and HIV, and to give guidance to facilitate implementation of HIV and infant feeding programmes in refugee and displaced situations, in emergency contexts, and as an integral element of a coordinated approach to public health, HIV and nutrition programming

Women, harm reduction, and HIV

PINKHAM, Sophie
MALINOWSKA-SEMPRUCH, Kasia
September 2007

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This report looks at factors that reduce women drug users’ access to health care including punitive policies, discrimination by police and health care providers, the intense social stigma attached to drug use by women, a preponderance of harm reduction and drug treatment programmes directed primarily toward men, an absence of sexual and reproductive health services for drug users, and poor access to effective outpatient drug treatment. Pregnant drug users are particularly vulnerable. In too many instances, they receive little or no accurate information about drug use during pregnancy or prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. In some countries pregnant drug users are rejected by health care providers, threatened with criminal penalties or loss of parental rights, or coerced into having an abortion or abandoning their newborns to the state. Poor access to medication-assisted treatment jeopardises the pregnancies of opiate-dependent drug users. It includes recommendations for consideration when designing services for women drug users and also examines issues around policies to protect women's health

Women and HIV : questions answered

RICHEY, Catherine
SHETTY, Vidya
August 2007

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Questions and answers are grouped into 4 sections: basic facts about HIV; family planning and HIV; health of mother and infant; and mother-to-child transmission of HIV

HIV and infant feeding : new evidence and programmatic experience|Report of a technical consultation held on behalf of the Inter-agency Task Team (IATT) on Prevention of HIV infections in pregnant women, Mother and their Infants, Geneva, Switzerland, 25-

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2007

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This report aims to clarify and refine existing UN guidance on HIV and infant feeding. It follows a previous technical consultation in 2000 and presents a summary of findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding HIV and Infant Feeding between 2000 and 2006

Behind the pandemic : uncovering the links between social inequity and HIV/AIDS

DE PAUW, Lia
2007

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This is an education toolkit which takes an exploratory and participatory approach to helping improve people's understanding about international HIV and AIDS issues and the links between HIV and AIDS and social inequity and poverty. There are three modules: Background and Basics, a Global HIV Pandemic Simulation, and Moving Into Action: Stopping the Pandemic. It also contains an extensive information section and instructions for leading the sessions

Continuum of care for HIV-positive women accessing programs to prevent parent-to-child transmission : findings from India

MAHENDRA, Vaishali S
et al
2007

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This is the report of a diagnostic study in 2005 to provide an evidence base to strengthen the national Indian prevention of parent-to-child transmission (PPTCT) initiative. The key research questions were: What are the treatment, care, and support needs of HIV-positive women and what services do the women utilize to meet their needs? What are the different ways (clinic-based, community-based, etc) to link HIV-positive women and their families with treatment and care services? The study indicated that linkages between PPTCT and HIV care services, as well as PPTCT and reproductive health services, were limited

Deadly links between mobility and HIV/AIDS

DODSON, Belinda
CRUSH, Jonathan
Eds
March 2006

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This volume of 'Crossings' is devoted to articles looking at the two-way connections between migration and HIV & AIDS. Not only can migration put people at greater risk of infection or reduce their access to medical care, but HIV & AIDS can also drive migration - both of adults and children

HIV and hepatitis

CARTER, Michael
NATIONAL AIDS MANUAL (NAM)
Ed
2006

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This booklet is aimed at people with HIV who also have hepatitis B or hepatitis C, viruses which can cause serious disease of the liver. It provides information which may help people discuss their health with their health care provider, but is not intended to replace health care

HIV risk exposure in young children : a study of 2-9 year olds served by public health facilities in the Free State, South Africa

SHISANA, Olive
MEHTAR, Shaheen
2005

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South Africa has, until now, focused its HIV prevention efforts on youth and adults, and now needs to expand its focus to include children. Much is already known about mother to child transmission, which is the dominant mode of HIV transmission among children. However, little investigation has been done into the potential for horizontal transmission of HIV on the population below reproductive age. This report focuses on children aged 2-9 years and, using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, presents evidence on the potential for HIV transmission in dental, maternity and paediatric service in public health facilities. A new finding concerns the practice of shared breastfeeding

Prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2005

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This is a key list of essential information resources on mother to child transmission of HIV. Mother to child transmission is the most common cause of HIV infection in children. A key element of work with under 8 year olds is prevention of mother-to-child transmission in pregnancy, childbirth and infant feeding practices. Key themes focus on access to anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) during pregnancy and childbirth, if and how to breastfeed, and confusion over unclear messages about infant feeding practices. The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action is concerned over some of the recommendations put forward by WHO, UNICEF and UNAIDS. For example, using infant formula instead of breastfeeding has been introduced in some resource-poor countries. In this case, babies may not receive the required protection against malnutrition, infection and premature death. Alternative courses of action include exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months, or early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding. This can cause suspicion of HIV leading to stigma. Encouraging women who do not want to change their baby feeding practices can be very difficult

AIDS in China : anatomy of an epidemic

2005

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Surely China does not face a general AIDS epidemic? The government says that only 0.07% of the general population is infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and, unlike some other governments' figures, this one may be an overestimate. The World Health Organisation (WHO) would prefer to quote a range of 0.05-0.08%. Moreover, large areas of the country have relatively few cases of HIV: in only three of China's 31 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities are more than 10,000 people infected. Even so, China does have an AIDS epidemic and, though it may not yet be a catastrophe on a national scale, it has the potential to become one

TB/HIV : a clinical manual

HARRIS, Anthony D
MAHER, Dermot
2004

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Developments since 1996, particularly in the TB/HIV field, have prompted a second edition of this popular manual which provides a pocket-sized guide to the clinical management of TB, particularly in patients suffering from co-infection with HIV. Designed for use by busy clinicians, the manual aims to promote the best possible diagnosis and treatment in low-income countries where the prevalence of TB and HIV infection is high, case loads are heavy, and laboratory support may be limited. With these needs in mind, the manual combines the latest scientific knowledge about TB and HIV with authoritative advice based on extensive field experience in several of the hardest hit countries. Throughout the manual, tables, flow charts, lists of do's and don'ts, questions and answers, and numerous practical tips are used to facilitate quick reference and correct decisions. Information ranges from advice on how to distinguish TB from other HIV-related pulmonary diseases to the simple reminder that in sub-Saharan Africa, anyone with TB is in a high risk group for HIV. Though primarily addressed to clinicians working at district hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa, the manual is also suitable for use in areas of Asia and South America where the problem of TB and HIV co-infection poses a growing clinical challenge

Reducing stigma and discrimination related to HIV and AIDS : training for health care workers. Trainer's manual

ENGENDERHEALTH
Ed
2004

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This manual is aimed at reducing stigma and discrimination in health care settings. Health workers' fears are based on real risks of medical transmission, due to lack of information and training and poor precaution practices. This manual uses participatory training methodologies to change health care workers' attitudes and provide practical information around patient rights and safe work environment. It covers a broad range of topics, including: stigma and discrimination, right to privacy and confidentiality, HIV transmission, standard precaution practices, post-exposure prophylaxis, and HIV testing

Antiretroviral drugs for treating pregnant women and preventing HIV infection in infants : guidelines on care, treatment and support for women living with HIV/AIDS and their children in resource-constrained settings

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2004

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Mother to child transmission is the most common cause of HIV infection in children. These guidelines provide updated information on WHO issued recommendations on the use of antiretroviral drugs for preventing mother to child transmission of HIV. These reassessments are within the context of rapidly expanding treatment programmes using simplified and standardised regimens. There has been experienced gained from treatment of mother to child transmission of HIV in resource poor settings as well as further evidence on the safety and effectiveness of various antiretroviral regimens. This document addresses issues of efficacy, safety, drug resistance and feasibility and intends to guide the selection of antiretroviral regimens. They may also be useful for health service providers as specific recommendations are provided for the most frequently encountered clinical situations

HIV transmission through breastfeeding : a review of available evidence

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND
2004

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This book presents a summary of the available scientific evidence on the transmission of HIV infection through breastfeeding. It briefly describes the benefits of breastfeeding for both mothers and infants; and summarizes evidence on the relative risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 infection during pregnancy, delivery, and breastfeeding.
Contents: 1. Executive Summary 2. Introdution 3. Background 4. Mother-to-child transmission 5. HIV transmission through breastfeeding 6. Preventing transmission through breastfeeding 7. Current or planned research 8. References

Counseling mothers on infant feeding for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV : a job-aid for primary health care workers

REGIONAL CENTRE FOR QUALITY OF HEALTH CARE
March 2003

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This booklet aims to help primary health care workers give advice to women on how to reduce the transmition of HIV to their breastfeeding babies. It is written at Primary 6 reading level and so should be appropriate for community health workers who can read at that level or above. It covers: basic counseling techniques; helping an HIV positive mother decide how to feed her baby; counseling HIV positive mothers on exclusive breastfeeding, during antenatal and postnatal visits; how to prepare animal milk for infants; how to prepare commercial infant formula for infants; and helping mothers who do not know their HIV status to decide how to feed their babies

Unsafe sex still main cause of HIV infection

INTEGRATED REGIONAL INFORMATION NETWORK (IRIN)
February 2003

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New research suggesting that unsafe medical practices are the main cause of HIV transmission has been rejected by medical experts in South Africa, who believe that unsafe sex is still the primary cause

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