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'What works' to ensure persons with disabilities have access to sexual and reproductive health services

Itad
June 2020

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A growing body of evidence shows that people with disabilities have historically been denied their sexual and reproductive health rights, despite having the same sexual and reproductive health needs as people without disabilities, and continue to face many barriers to accessing these lifesaving services.

This evidence gap map, developed as part of the UK Department for International Development’s Women’s Integrated Sexual Reproductive Health (WISH) programme, collates evidence on ‘what works’ to enable access to sexual reproductive health services for persons with disabilities in low and middle-income countries.

Interagency list of essential medical devices for reproductive health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2008

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This interagency list is a tool to support planning for the selection, quality assurance and procurement of medical devices to implement Maternal and Newborn Health (MNH) interventions, which are defined as the "Essential care to women and their newborn during pregnancy, childbirth and postnatal period: up to six weeks after delivery." The objective is to propose an international consensus on a rational selection of essential medical devices for reproductive health according to their public health relevance based on efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness. Published by the WHO on behalf of John Snow Inc., PATH, Population Action International, United Nations Population Fund, and the World Bank, in collaboration with the United Nations Children's Fund and Medecins Sans Frontieres. The WHO and partnering organisations plan to update this list every two years

Another way to learn : case studies

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION
2007

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These case studies come from an initiative that supports non-formal education projects in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America. The long-term goal of these projects is to develop sustainable livelihoods for low-income, low-literate populations by addressing vulnerability to HIV and AIDS and drug misuse, a lack of education and social exclusion. Central to all of these projects are the creative and innovative methods used to communicate in a meaningful way, engage people and encourage their participation. The projects all focus on capacity building, empowerment, and creating learning opportunities. A DVD has been produced to accompany this publication

Civil society perspectives on TB policy in Bangladesh, Brazil, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Thailand

Public Health Watch, Open Society Institute
2006

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This publication contains an overview of the common themes and funding resulting from five country reports, and the five reports themselves. The World Health Organization has designated all five as TB-high burden countries. The research findings show a low level of awareness about TB, and TB and HIV co-infection; about how TB is transmitted and how it can be cured; and about the link between poverty and TB; as well as low media coverage of TB and a lack of strong communication strategies for national TB programmes. It also contains country-specific recommendations

Promoting young people's sexual and reproductive health : stigma, discrimination and human rights

WOOD, Kate
AGGLETON, Peter
2004

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Stigma, discrimination and the violation of human rights impact on people's experiences of sexual relationships, and on practitioners' and policy-makers' ability to promote young people sexual health. This resource sets out how stigma and discrimination influence sexual health, identifies some principles of good practice, and introduces examples of innovative and effective practice with young people from Africa, Asia, Central and Latin America

HIV/AIDS and early childhood [whole issue]

BARTLETT, Kathy
ZIMANYI, Louise
Eds
December 2002

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This is one of the few publications solely dedicated to early childhood and HIV/AIDS. It contains articles examining the particular experience of the very young child and the social, psychosocial and nutritional impact on their lives in AIDS affected communities. There is also an article about infant feeding practices in Africa. It makes some policy recommendations and the several case studies provide some direct examples of programming in this area

Communications framework for HIV/AIDS : a new direction

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
1999

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This framework, the product of a participatory research project on the use of communications for HIV prevention, finds conventional communications that focus on behaviour change limited in their scope and effectiveness. It questions the relationship between knowledge and behaviour, and the stress in ‘behaviour change’ communication on individual change. For sustainable change, the influence of a number of domains of social context need to be addressed, including: political and policy frameworks, gender, socio-economic status, spirituality and religion, and culture. It builds on these domains to create broad regional strategies for communications in Asia, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. Its suggestions for future national strategies combine interpersonal communication and mass media in key areas of HIV/AIDS prevention and care. It stipulates that participatory processes are central to designing and operationalising national strategies

Early childhood development

WORLD BANK

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The early child development (ECD) website is a knowledge source designed to assist policy makers, programme managers, and practitioners in their efforts to promote the healthy growth and integral development of young children. It lists details of the key players in the field of ECD, contains downloadable resources including documents, reports and websites, and has a regional focus on Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America. The website contains sections on the World Bank's ECD and HIV/AIDS initiative in sub-Saharan Africa as well as tools and manuals developed by the World Bank's ECD team

Women's global network for reproductive rights (WGNRR)

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The Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights is an autonomous network of groups and individuals in every continent who aim to achieve and support reproductive rights for women. It offers critical and feminist analysis and consistently places issues of reproductive and sexual health rights within the larger socio-economic context by means of a newsletter, website, campaigns, an annual Call for Action, participation in relevant international meetings, networking and coalition-building

Network

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Aimed at all health workers, Network focuses on family planning and family health, including innovative strategies for health communication and service delivery in developing countries. It contains research and project reports, topical reviews and lists of FHI publications
Four times a year
Free

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