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Monitoring employment rights of people with disabilities in Kathmandu, Nepal, Holistic report 2018

PRASAI, Sagar
PANT, Aashish
June 2018

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This report presents the results of a monitoring project on the employment situation of persons with disabilities in Nepal. The report is one step toward a comprehensive evaluation of Nepal’s constitutional, legal and policy framework. Findings scrutinise the country’s implementation of laws and policies based on the daily life experiences of persons with disabilities. These experiences are used to assess the level of rights violations, the reasons behind those violations, and possible solutions. This holistic report offers an in-depth analysis of the life circumstances for persons with disabilities, with a specific focus on employment. The analysis has been conducted in relation to fundamental human rights principles of dignity, autonomy, participation, inclusion and accessibility, non-discrimination and equality and respect for difference. The report highlights the degree of implementation of the constitution, laws, policies and programs, enacted to protect and advance the human rights, and specifically the employment rights, of persons with disabilities. The report also highlights the experiences of persons with disabilities with reflection of societal attitudes. 

This study is part of a larger initiative called the DRPI AWARE (Asian Workplace Approach that Respects Equality) project. In each of the three monitoring sites (Hyderabad, Dhaka, Kathmandu), monitors used an interview and focus group guide to capture a specialized data set and analyze violations of the right to work and employment.

Invisible victims of sexual violence. Access to justice for women and girls with disabilities in India

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
April 2018

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This report is based on 17 cases of sexual violence against women and girls with disabilities in eight Indian states. It comes five years after The Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013 (the 2013 amendments) were adopted in India. It follows Human Rights Watch’s November 2017 report “Everyone Blames Me”: Barriers to Justice and Support Services for Sexual Assault Survivors in India, which found that rape survivors still face significant barriers obtaining justice and critical support services because legal and other reforms have not been fully realised.

This report finds that while the 2013 amendments have made significant progress in responding to the widespread challenges that victims of sexual violence endure, they have yet to properly develop and implement support for survivors with disabilities in the form of trainings and reforms throughout the criminal justice system. It highlights gaps in enforcement and calls for concrete measures to address the needs of women and girls with disabilities seeking justice for abuse. 

INCLUDE US! Good practices in the inclusion of persons with disabilities in Myanmar

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
2018

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In 2015, Humanity & Inclusion HI began the project: “Empowering persons with disabilities to contribute to equal access to basic social services and local policymaking processes in under-resourced areas of Ayeyarwady and Mandalay”. The project supported Disabled Peoples Organizations and other civil society groups to participate in the development of inclusive regional policies and programmes, and to promote good practices contributing to greater access to services for persons with disabilities. An aim was also to document, publish and disseminate these good practices throughout Myanmar, increasing awareness and understanding in order to sensitise people to disability inclusion and influence policy change. Rather than focusing on what is not working, this report seeks to shift attention to what has worked locally and how it could be replicated in other parts of the country, providing constructive, practical recommendations to decision-makers, service providers and other community groups in Myanmar. The report is related to two projects. The second is “Advocacy for Change: Fostering protection and rights of men and women with disabilities in Myanmar”. 

 

There are global recommendations. There are seven good practices:

  • Related to education:  Case Study I: Promoting Inclusion of children with disabilities in Middle Schools of Ayartaw. Case Study II: How the development of the teacher training promotes inclusion of all children in education
  • Related to economic life: Case Study III: How partnerships between private companies and organizations of people with disabilities can improve access to employment and vocational training
  • Related to social/community life: Case Study IV: Giving the Myanmar Deaf Community access to information.  Case Study V: How parental advocacy can make a difference
  • Related to political life: Case Study VI: Community advocacy in obtaining the National Registration Card. Case Study VII: Supporting people with disabilities to participate in Myanmar elections

 

Employment outcomes of skills training in South Asian countries: An evidence summary

ILAVARASAN, P Vigneswara
KUMAR, Arpan K
ASWANI, Reema
November 2017

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This evidence summary of systematic reviews provides insights for policy makers surrounding the impact of training programmes on employment outcomes. There are 11 studies included in this summary focusing on technical and vocational education and training (TVET), rehabilitation and counselling, personality development (including leadership training, stress management and communication skills training) and entrepreneurship training programmes.

 

The target groups covered in the included studies are diverse including people with disabilities, health workers, women and enterprises as a whole. The final studies comprise of one study each from 2011 and 2017; two studies each from 2013, 2015 and 2016; and three studies from 2014. The focus of this evidence is on low and middle income South Asian countries namely: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka

Disability research and capacity development - Newsletter July 2017

Disability Research and Capacity Development (DRD)
July 2017

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This newsletter includes reports on: awareness and support skills training for university students; a workshop on gender and disability; a meeting of the scholarship and mentorship programme; a trading stock company providing favourable conditions for employees with disabilities; training courses on laws and policies to support people with disabilities; and a workshop on equality and inclusion.

Healthcare provider's attitude towards disability and experience of women with disabilities in the use of maternal healthcare service in rural Nepal

DEVKOTA, Hridaya Raj
KETT, Maria
GROCE, Nora
MURRAY, Emily
June 2017

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BACKGROUND:
Women with disabilities are less likely to receive maternal healthcare services compared to women without disabilities. While few studies have reviewed healthcare experience of women with disabilities, no studies have been conducted to understand provider's attitude towards disability in Nepal, yet the attitude and behaviour of healthcare providers may have a significant influence on aspects of care and the use of service by women with disabilities. This study examines healthcare provider's attitudes towards disability and explores the experience of women with disabilities in maternal healthcare service utilization during pregnancy and childbirth.

METHOD:
The study used mixed method approach. An attitude survey was conducted among 396 healthcare providers currently working in public health facilities in Rupandehi district of Nepal. For additional insight, eighteen in-depth interviews with women with disabilities who used maternal healthcare services in a healthcare facility within the study district in their last pregnancy were undertaken. The Attitude Towards Disabled Persons (ATDP) scale score was used to measure the attitudes of healthcare providers. For quantitative data, univariate and multivariate analysis using ANOVA was used to understand the association between outcome and independent variables and qualitative analysis generated and described themes.

Reproductive Health, 2017

Not forgetting severe mental disorders in humanitarian emergencies: a descriptive study from the Philippines

WEINTRAUB, Ana Cecilia Andrade de Moraes
et al
November 2016

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"In response to the Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, Médecins Sans Frontières-Operational Centre Brussels (MSF-OCB) decided to concentrate its efforts in the severely affected area of Guiuan and its four surrounding municipalities. The MSF-OCB intervention included a comprehensive approach to mental health, including care for people with pre-existing and post-disaster severe mental disorders. Based on this experience of providing MH care in the first five months after Typhoon Haiyan, we report on the monthly volume of MH activities and beneficiaries; sociodemographic and care seeking characteristics of beneficiaries receiving MH counselling/care, stratified by the severity of their condition; profile and outcomes of patients with severe mental disorders; prescribing practice of psychotropic medication; and main factors facilitating the identification and management of individuals with severe mental disorders"

International Health, Vol.8, No.5, pp. 336-344

Doi: 10.1093/inthealth/ihw032

Technical report 2 : capacity building for disability inclusive disaster risk reduction in Indonesia

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the second Technical Report in a three part series, 'Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia'. This Technical Report details the Capacity Building component of the Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia project. This project was funded by the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Australian Development and Research Awards Scheme 2013-2015. This award scheme promotes research and development programs through collaboration between researchers in Australia and elsewhere and INGOs and NGOs in country

 

Relevant to capacity building, two aims of the Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia project were:

1. To increase the understanding of people with disabilities of Disaster Risk Reduction and their capacity to engage with Disaster Risk Reduction policy; and,

2. To understand and subsequently inform the knowledge base of village volunteers (Kaders subsequently referred to as cadres) and DRR administrators about DiDRR at local and national levels in Indonesia

Supplement to technical report 2 : capacity building for disability inclusive disaster risk reduction in Indonesia : practitioner guidelines for capacity building for disability inclusive disaster risk reduction in Indonesia

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This report is a supplement to the Technical Report 'Capacity Building for Disability Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction in Indonesia'. Disability Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction (DiDRR) is increasingly recognised as an important component of community resilience in the event of a natural disaster as documented in the recent outcome of the 3rd World Conference, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. Central to DiDDR is people with disabilities themselves and their capacities to participate in, and contribute to disaster risk reduction policies, practices and programs

 

The Practitioner Guidelines provide orientation to the Work Packages undertaken to build the capacity of people with disabilities in disaster risk reduction in Indonesia as part of the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Australian Development and Research Awards Scheme funded project, 2013-2015, Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. These Work Packages formed one component of the project with knowledge transfer and capacity building supplemented by other methods within the project, including coaching and sponsoring participation of select trainees at key post-2015 DRR policy events

Prosthetics & orthotics impact assessment : India and Bangladesh

COCHRANE, Helen
ROSARIO, Demetria
SINGH, Anil
GHOSH, Ritu
June 2015

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Mobility India is the only International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics​ (ISPO) recognised program in India offering training for ISPO Category II single discipline. From 2002 to the time of the study Mobility India enrolled two hundred and twenty-one students. This study was conducted in association with ISPO’s USAID funded programme: ‘Rehabilitation of physically disabled people in developing countries’. Activities included: field visits to India and Bangladesh, interviewing Ministry officials, Heads of Clinical Services and Heads of Prosthetic and Orthotic Departments;  a partial audit of graduate clinical skills and competencies and determining the professional development needs of graduates in selected South-East Asian countries; and listening to service users, hearing stories of how services had directly impacted upon their lives. Services in India and Pakistan are outlined and 22 recommendations to help to further develop prosthetic and orthotic services are provided.

Disability at a glance 2015: Strengthening employment prospects for persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific

UN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ESCAP), Social Development Division
2015

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This report, the fifth edition in the Disability at a Glance series, focuses on barriers to the employment of persons with disabilities in the Asia-Pacific region, and offers solutions to strengthen their employment prospects. It offers a regional overview of disability legislation, policies and practices, as well as relevant country-specific information with a particular emphasis on the employment of persons with disabilities. The information is drawn from a targeted disability survey carried out in 2015 by the ESCAP secretariat, and research undertaken by other organizations and scholars.

The publication consists mainly of two parts. In Part 1, Chapter 1 discusses key employment trends shaping the experiences of persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific. Chapter 2 considers the major barriers that persons with disabilities face as they seek to find decent work in the open labour market. Chapter 3 explores a number of strategies used by governments and in the private sector to promote greater access to employment for persons with disabilities. Finally, Chapter 4 lays out a series of action points governments should consider in their efforts to remove the numerous employment barriers faced by many millions of disabled people. In Part 2, country snapshots provide the latest demographic, socioeconomic and employment-specific data from 58 countries in 5 ESCAP subregions .

Disability inclusion : translating policy into practice in humanitarian action

PEARCE, Emma
March 2014

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This report “documents positive practices and ongoing challenges to promote disability inclusion across UNHCR’s and its partners’ work in multiple countries and multiple displacement contexts. The report provides lessons and recommendations for other organizations and the wider humanitarian community on engaging persons with disabilities at all levels of humanitarian work. It draws on consultations with over 700 displaced persons, including persons with disabilities, their families, and humanitarian staff, in eight countries”

Note: This report is also offered in plain text format

Mainstreaming disability and ageing in water, sanitation and hygiene sector

JONES, Hazel
September 2013

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This report presents the findings of a desk study that provided an overview of the current state of disability and ageing issues in WASH, from the perspective of the WASH sector. Both disabled and older people were looked at together, because many frail older people, although they may reject the label ‘disabled’, experience impairments that limit their daily activities, which result in them facing similar kinds of barriers to accessing WASH

Community volunteers : an asset for detecting and following up children with disabilities

INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR EVIDENCE ON DISABILITY (ICED)
December 2012

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This video presents a  recording of a seminar held at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in November 2012.  The seminar explores the findings and recommendations from a four year CBM-funded project in Bangladesh and Pakistan to identify children with disabilities and connect them with appropriate rehabilitative services

Mainstreaming disability in disaster risk reduction : a training manual and faciliiation guide

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2011

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This training manual was developed to provide information on the link between disability and disasters and the experiences of Handicap International in including and engaging with persons with disabilities in disaster risk reduction (DRR).  It provides information to managers and policy makers in government and non-government organisations. A facilitation guide that includes detailed chapter-by-chapter sample training sessions for use by community groups and other stakeholders addressing the topics in the manual

Evaluation of a pilot community based rehabilitation training programme in East Timor

SHAMROCK , Jane
July 2009

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"The first Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) training programme in East Timor was held in Dili between March 2006 and August 2007 based on the Community Approaches to Handicap in Development (CAHD) model. This article presents the results of an evaluation of the training by studying the impact of the CBR training on the trainees. The evaluation was completed by (a) investigating how the trainee CBR workers experienced their training period, (b) describing the work of the 12 active CBR workers and (c) commenting on the value of the CAHD toolkit as a basis for the CBR training. The evaluation found that CBR workers were providing a variety of CBR interventions with some errors occurring because of insufficient skills in assessment, problem solving, monitoring and evaluation. The CAHD toolkit was found to be a useful framework for the training programme with changes needed in response to the needs of the trainees"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 20, No 2

Mainstreaming disability into disaster risk reduction : a training manual

ULMASOVA, Irina
SILCOCK, Nathalie
SCHRANZ, Björn
January 2009

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This manual aims to build professionals' capacities to mainstream disability in disaster risk reduction and to improve general knowledge on disability and disaster risk reduction. It is designed in a logical modular sequence, providing practical tools and guidelines for topic-related training sessions. Each training session is detailed with suggested time allocation, methods, tools and learning objectives. The information is based upon a 'Mainstreaming disability and people with disabilities into disaster management in Nepal' project, which was implemented by Handicap International in December 2007. A CD-Rom is available to accompany the manual. This manual is useful for people interested in mainstreaming disability into disaster risk reduction

Traning report

2008

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This training of trainers brought together 23 participants from nine countries - Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, of which the majority were disabled women. It accompanies a training manual to help facilitate cascade training at a national level and through other disabled women's organisations not invovled in the original project

Integrating mental health into primary care : a global perspective

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
WORLD ORGANIZATION OF FAMILY DOCTORS (WONCA)
2008

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This report provides the rationale and know-how on integrating mental health into primary health care. It outlines primary care for mental health in context and then presents primary care for mental health in practice, highlighting 12 case studies and key lessons learnt from specific countries. A detailed annex on the core functions of primary care workers is provided, as well as 10 core principles of mental health integration. This resource is useful to anyone interested in integrating mental health into primary care

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