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Contingency planning guide

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES
2012

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This document provides an overview of the key elements of contingency planning. This guide is aimed at assisting National Society and IFRC staff responsible for developing contingency plans at the local, national, regional or global levels. It is essential to develop contingency plans in consultation and cooperation with those who will have to implement or approve them. This document provides guidelines, not strict rules; planning priorities will differ according to the context and scope of any given situation. This guide breaks contingency planning down into five main steps: prepare, analyse, develop, implement and review. Each step is covered by a separate chapter in this document

Contingency plan for natural disasters (including those arising from severe weather conditions)

EMERGENCY SUPPORT UNIT, SECURITY BUREAU, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government
September 2007

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This contingency plan summarises the Government’s alerting systems and organisational framework for responding to such disasters in Hong Kong. Functions and responsibilities of Government departments and other bodies in the event of natural disasters including those resulting from severe weather conditions are also set out in this Contingency Plan

File Ref. SEC 8/2/12 Part 30

Strategic issues in preventing cataract blindness in developing countries

Ellwein, L B
Kupfer, C
1995

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Cataract blindness is a public health problem of major proportions in developing countries. Intracapsular cataract extraction with aphakic spectacles has been the standard surgical technique for restoring sight. Because of image magnification in the operated eye, however, the result in unilaterally blind patients is less than satisfactory. Fortunately, with the availability of low-cost intraocular lenses ( IOL) and ophthalmologists trained in extracapsular surgery, it is now practical to intervene successfully in the unilateral case. The need for increased attention on the quality of the visual outcome is only one of three important strategic issues in cataract blindness control. The existing high prevalence of cataract blindness in developing countries and an increasing cataract incidence due to an aging population require substantial increases in surgical volume. The third issue relates to cost. If significant increases in surgical volume and quality of outcomes are to be realised without an increased need for external funding, service delivery must be made more efficient. The expansion of IOL surgery for unilateral blindness is a favourable trend in ensuring financial sustainability of delivery systems; patients can be operated on while still economically productive and able to pay rather than waiting for bilateral blindness and a less favourable economic and social impact. It the quality, volume, and cost issues are to be successfully addressed, operational and structural changes to eye care delivery systems are necessary. These changes can be effected through training, technology introduction, management of facilities, social marketing, organizational partnerships, and evaluation. With improved understanding of the critical factors in successful models their widespread replication will be facilitated.

Community-based DRR

PREVENTION WEB

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This section of Prevention Web website hosts a collection of resources on the organisations approach to Disaster Risk Reduction. The approach engages the local community in managing local disaster risk often with the collaboration of external actors from civil society, local government and the private sector. This section provides links to progress reports, meetings notes, training packs and academic resources on community based disaster risk reduction 

Comprehensive reproductive health and family planning training curriculum

PATHFINDER INTERNATIONAL

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These training modules have been designed for the training of physicians, nurses, and midwives by clinical trainers who do not have an extensive training background. Training sessions include simulation skills practice, case studies, role plays, discussions, clinical practices, on-site observation, specific measurable objectives, knowledge, attitudes, skills checklists, and exercises for the development of action plans. Module contents available online: 1. Introduction/Overview 2. Infection Prevention 3. Counselling 4. Combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only pills 5. Emergency Contraceptive Pills (ECPs) 6. DMPA 7. IUDs 8. Lactational Amenorrhea and Breast Feeding Support 9. Condoms and spermicides 11. MVA for treatment of incomplete abortion 12. Reproductive tract infections 13. Postpartum/Postabortion Contraception 14. Training of Trainers 16. Reproductive Health Services for Adolescents

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