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My right is our future the transformative power of disability-inclusive education. 03 Series on disability-inclusive development

CBM International
November 2018

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This publication explores the challenges of disability-inclusive education systems and provides practical support suggestions that can better meet both the general and specific learning needs of all children, including those with disabilities. It recognises that inclusive education is a complex process and aims to help governmental and non-governmental actors to navigate the most suitable pathways to change.

Topics include: Individual and systemic approaches; non-negotiable commitments; collaboration; long-term process; understanding and awareness; stakeholder empowerment and engagement; Innovation: accessibility and reasonable accommodation; Innovation: teachers and teacher education; Innovation: transition and lifelong learning; and organising inclusive education systems

15 case studies are provided

Disability and inclusive education - A stocktake of education sector plans and GPE-funded grants

BANHAM, Louise
PAPAKOSTI, Elena
et al
March 2018

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This report was commissioned by the Global Partnership for Education’s Secretariat to take stock of how disability and inclusive education are included in education sector plans in 51 countries, including GPE-funded programs, such as education sector program implementation grants, program documents, implementation progress reports education sector analysis, if applicable, and other relevant GPE program documents.

This report documents progress and highlights the need to step up support to GPE partner countries on disability and inclusive education, to improve consideration of issues around disability and inclusion in education sector analysis and sector planning processes to better promote the achievement of GPE 2020 strategic goal 2, and to fulfill the transformative vision of Agenda 2030

GEM report summary on disabilities and education

UNESCO
2018

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In support of the run-up to the 2020 GEM Report on inclusion and education, this paper contains summarised content related to disabilities and education in previous Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Reports since 2010. Reports cited from 2010 and 2015 monitored countries in the Global South. The GEM Report started monitoring countries in the Global North from the 2016 Report onwards only.

 

Topics covered include: compliance monitoring; the role of civil society organisations; lack of data; marginalisation; data on primary school attendance; intersection with other disadvantages; different education related challenges; and ten education policies to counteract marginalisation.

Global education monitoring report, 2019: migration, displacement and education: building bridges, not walls

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
et al
2018

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“The 2019 GEM Report continues its assessment of progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4) on education and its ten targets, as well as other related education targets in the SDG agenda.


Its main focus is on the theme of migration and displacement. It presents evidence on the implications of different types of migration and displacement for education systems but also the impact that reforming education curricula and approaches to pedagogy and teacher preparation can have on addressing the challenges and opportunities posed by migration and displacement. It gives voice to experiences in host and home communities.


With the help of case studies, it illustrates approaches which work and could be scaled up. In this way, it aims to be a tool for practitioners. It will make the case for investing in education of good quality in rural areas suffering from depopulation and in slum areas suffering from large population inflows; in countries with high rates of emigration and those with high rates of immigration; in short-term refugee emergencies and in protracted crises. Its analysis, conclusions and recommendations advance the aims of SDG 4 and its call to leave no one behind.”

Quality inclusive education for children with disabilities in Ethiopia

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL ETHIOPIA
2017

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Achieving education for all in Ethiopia will remain a distant aspiration if most of the 5 million children with special educational needs in the country cannot go to school. Since 2014, Handicap International have been supporting 49 schools to become places where everyone has a role to play in making schools more inclusive.

Asia Education Summit on Flexible Learning Strategies for Out-of-School Children

UNESCO
November 2016

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The Asia Education Summit on Flexible Learning Strategies for Out-of-School Children (24-26 February 2016) brought more than 550 education and learning colleagues from across the Asian Region and world to Bangkok, Thailand. The Summit welcomed 121 speakers and over 100 government officials. More than two-thirds of the Summit’s participants were NGO representatives and educators in the region who were, and currently are working “on the ground” in efforts with and for out-of-school children (OOSC).  This report aims to highlight and give voice to the unique innovative initiatives and flexible learning strategies shared during the course of this three-day summit. Each presentation summary in this report is intended to stand alone, while contributing to the collaborative nature and understanding of the innovations and FLS for OOSC presented. Presentations inlcuded "Sustainable and Innovative Financing for Disabled and Disadvantaged OOSC in Thailand: Mae Hong Son Model"

Impact area overview: the right to inclusive quality education

PLAN INTERNATIONAL
July 2016

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A review by Plan International of their work in the area of inclusive education is presented. Rights associated with inclusive education, education targets in SDGs and global education intitatives and trends are outlined. Issues associated with inclusive education implementation and what needs to be done are discussed. The experience, standards, priorities and strategies and advocacy of Plan International are reported.

Education 2030 Incheon Declaration And Framework for action towards inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning for all

WORLD EDUCATION FORUM 2015
2015

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UNESCO together with UNICEF, the World Bank, UNFPA, UNDP, UN Women and UNHCR organized the World Education Forum 2015 in Incheon, Republic of Korea, from 19 – 22 May 2015, hosted by the Republic of Korea. Over 1,600 participants from 160 countries, including over 120 Ministers, heads and members of delegations, heads of agencies and officials of multilateral and bilateral organizations, and representatives of civil society, the teaching profession, youth and the private sector, adopted the Incheon Declaration for Education 2030, which sets out a new vision for education for the next fifteen years.

Towards 2030: a new vision for education

Our vision is to transform lives through education, recognizing the important role of education as a main driver of development and in achieving the other proposed SDGs. We commit with a sense of urgency to a single, renewed education agenda that is holistic, ambitious and aspirational, leaving no one behind. This new vision is fully captured by the proposed SDG 4 “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all” and its corresponding targets. It is transformative and universal, attends to the ‘unfinished business’ of the EFA agenda and the education-related MDGs, and addresses global and national education challenges. It is inspired by a humanistic vision of education and development based on human rights and dignity; social justice; inclusion; protection; cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity; and shared responsibility and accountability. We reaffirm that education is a public good, a fundamental human right and a basis for guaranteeing the realization of other rights. It is essential for peace, tolerance, human fulfilment and sustainable development. We recognize education as key to achieving full employment and poverty eradication. We will focus our efforts on access, equity and inclusion, quality and learning outcomes, within a lifelong learning approach.

 

Action and commitments required to implement the agenda are presented.

Equal right, equal opportunity – Inclusive education for children with disabilities

WALKER, Jo
2013

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This report synthesises current evidence on the policy responses which can help bring down the common barriers faced by disabled children in gaining a quality education, across seven inter-dependent strategies – from the family, local communities and national government, through to the international community. 

 

The strategies are: create appropriate legislative frameworks, and set out ambitious national plans for inclusion; provide the capacity, resources and leadership to implement ambitious national plans on inclusion; improve data on disability and education, and build accountability for action; make schools and classrooms accessible and relevant for all; ensure there are enough appropriately trained teachers for all; challenge attitudes which reinforce and sustain discrimination; create an enabling environment to support inclusive education, including through cross-sectoral policies and strategies that reduce exclusion.

 

Actions to be taken by national governments to achieve these strategies are presented.

 

Case studies in India, Italy, Ethopia, Bolivia, Bangladesh, Mozambique, Gambia, Burkino Faso and Palestine are provided.

 

 

INEE minimum standards for education : preparedness, response, recovery

INEE COORDINATION FOR MINIMUM STANDARDS
2010

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This resource presents "the minimum level of educational quality and access in emergencies through to recovery. The aim of the handbook is to enhance the quality of educational preparedness, response and recovery; to increase access to safe and relevant learning opportunities for all learners, regardless of their age, gender or abilities; and to ensure accountability and strong coordination in the provision of education in emergencies through to recovery...The INEE Minimum Standards are organised in five domains: Foundation standards; Access and learning environment; Teaching and learning; Teachers and other education; personnel; Education policy"

Managing teachers : the centrality of teacher management to quality education. lessons from developing countries

MPOKOSA, Chikondi NDARUHUTSE, Susy
September 2008

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This report includes primary research undertaken by CBT Education Trust and VSO in thirteen developing countries and from other national level research and international synthesis reports addressing quality education. The aim is to outline the steps required to improve education throughout the world. The study is predicated on the belief that better quality teachers leads to better quality education

An investigation of the needs of primary school educators in the Cape Metropolitan area working with learners who have English as a second language

O'CONNOR, Julie
March 2006

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This study aims to describe the needs of Grade 1, 2 and 3 educators at government schools in the Cape Metropolitan area working with English-second (or other) language (ESOL) learners, in order to inform the practice of speech-language therapists in meeting these needs. It describes both the perceptions and experiences of educators regarding ESOL learners, as well as the educators’ strategies to overcome the challenges they faced when teaching ESOL learners

Prepared for kindergarten : what does "readiness" mean?

ACKERMAN, Debra J
BARNETT, W Steven
2005

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Stakeholders at the local, state and federal levels agree that a child's future academic success is dependent on being ready to learn and participate in a successful kindergarten experience. But it can be difficult to define "readiness". Due to their different prekindergarten education experiences and irregular and episodic development, children enter kindergarten with widely varying skills, knowledge, and levels of preparedness. Parents and teachers also have differing expectations for what children should know and be able to do before starting kindergarten. Furthermore, discussions of readiness do not always include how schools and communities can enhance and support children's kindergarten readiness, no matter what their socioeconomic status, home language background, or skill level. This policy brief addresses what we know about readiness and how it may be improved

Families as primary partners in their child's development and school readiness

HEPBURN, Kathy Seitzinger
December 2004

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The purpose of this toolkit is to provide guidance, resource materials and references that will assist communities in working with families as partners in their child's development and school readiness. By recognizing and building the capacity of parents as their child's first educators and engaging parents as decision makers for their child and leaders in the agencies and organizations that serve them, communities can strengthen families and support young children being ready for school. Part 1 explores aspects of: parent education and parents as a child's first teachers; parent education models, including home-visiting and site-based programmes; professional and paraprofessional preparation to deliver parent education services; and programme outcomes and evaluation. Part 2 investigates: parent involvement as decision makers and in leadership roles; policies and standards that support parents as leaders; parent and provider/professional preparation for and engagement in collaborative leadership; and sustaining collaborative leadership. The intent is to support a holistic approach and encourage parents as primary partners across all systems that serve young children and their families and help young children grow up healthy, develop well, and enter school ready to learn. The toolkit includes tip lists, check lists and comprehensive thematic lists of annotated resources

State of the world's children 2004 : ­girls, education and development

BELLAMY, Carol
2003

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This year's report focuses on girls' education and its implica- tions for development. It presents the many benefits of educat- ing girls, examines the barriers that keep more girls out of school and the lasting impact such exclusion has on a country's development, details why education is the most effective means of combating many of the most profound challenges to human development and presents concrete and practical recommendations for the way forward

The continuity framework : a tool for building home, school and community partnerships

BROWN, Glyn E
et al
2002

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This article focuses on a set of training materials that has been developed to assist community partnerships in their efforts to plan and monitor services for children. These materials highlight eight elements of continuity and successful partnerships: (1) families as partners, (2) shared leadership, (3) comprehensive/responsive services, (4) culture and home language, (5) communication, (6) knowledge and skill development, (7) appropriate care and education, and (8) evaluation of partnership success. Results from a field study that included more than 200 reviewers and eight pilot sites are summarized. Results indicate that a majority of reviewers found the training materials easy to understand, relevant to their work, and up-to-date. In addition, data gathered from the pilot sites indicate that the partnerships found the materials practical and useful for addressing a variety of issues, including time constraints, communication gaps, differences in professional training, and funding limitations

In my classroom : guide to reflexive practice

DU PLESSIS, Joy
et al
2002

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This practical guide "suggests ways of working together in schools and teacher networks. Through the use of reflection and dialogue, the materials ask teachers to analyze their own teaching context and try out new teaching strategies...(it provides) teachers with opportunities to examine the ideas and examples, discuss them with colleagues and others, and guides them through adapting tasks, practices, and materials that may be used effectively in their own context"

In the web of cultural transition : a tracer study of children in Embu District, Kenya

NJENGA, Ann
KABIRU, Margaret
November 2001

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The study compares children who were taught by preschool teachers trained in the two-year course run by District Centres for Early Childhood Education (DICECE) with those who had untrained teachers. The study, carried out in Embu District (Kenya), found significant differences between the two groups of children particularly in terms of performance in primary schools, with children cared for by DICECE-trained teachers faring better, and in relation to absenteeism, repetition and dropout rates

Starting school : effective transitions

DOCKETT, Sue
PERRY, Bob
2001

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This paper focuses on effective transition-to-school programmes. Using a framework of 10 guidelines developed through the Starting School Research Project, it provides examples of effective strategies and transition programmes.The guidelines argue that effective transition-to-school programmes: establish positive relationships between the children, parents, and educators; facilitate each child's development as a capable learner; differentiate between "orientation-to-school" and "transition-to-school" programmes; draw upon dedicated funding and resources; involve a range of stakeholders; are well planned and effectively evaluated; are flexible and responsive; are based on mutual trust and respect; rely on reciprocal communication among participants; take into account contextual aspects of community and of individual families and children within that community. In this context, the nature of some current transition programmes is questioned, and the curriculum of transition is problematised. In particular, issues are raised around who has input into such programmes and who decides on appropriate curriculum

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