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World youth report 2003 : the global situation of young people

UNITED NATIONS. Department for Economic and Social Affairs
Ed
2004

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Overall, young people today are better off than previous generations, but many are still severely hindered by a lack of education, poverty, health risks, unemployment and the impact of conflict. The World Youth Report 2003 provides an overview of the global situation of young people. The first ten chapters focus on the priority areas of education, employment, extreme poverty, health issues, the environment, drugs, delinquency, leisure time, the situation of girls and young women, and youth participation in decision-making as identified by the World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY) adopted by the General Assembly in 1995. The remaining five chapters address some of the newer issues that were later identified as additional priorities for youth and were adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2003

World health report 2004 : changing history

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2004

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This report argues that a comprehensive HIV/AIDS strategy linking prevention, treatment, care and support for people living with the virus could save the lives of millions of people in poor and middle-income countries. At present, almost six million people in developing countries need treatment, but only about 400 000 of them received it in 2003. The World Health Report 2004 argues that a treatment gap of such dimensions is indefensible and that narrowing it is both an ethical obligation and a public health necessity. In September 2003 WHO, UNAIDS and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and their partners launched an effort to provide three million people in developing countries with antiretroviral therapy (ART) by end 2005 - the 3 by 5 initiative. This World Health Report shows how a partnership linking international organizations, national governments, the private sector and communities is working simultaneously to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment, reinforce HIV prevention and strengthen health systems in some of the countries where they are currently weakest

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

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This report, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

An information system and medical record to support HIV treatment in rural Haiti

FRASER, H S
et al
2004

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Recent studies have shown the feasibility of treating HIV/AIDS in developing countries. Lack of infrastructure, including information and communication systems, is considered a barrier to successful HIV treatment programmes. Internet based information systems offer a way to provide communication infrastructure in remote, resource-poor areas such as rural Haiti. A web based medical record system can be effectively used to track clinical outcomes, laboratory tests and drug supplies, and create reports for funding agencies. Development and evaluation of practical, low cost clinical information systems should be a priority in rolling out HIV treatment in developing countries

Estrategias para Incentivar la Interacción virtual entre Pediatras y Neonatólogos del Perú|[Strategies to allow the virtual interaction among pediatricians and neonatologists from Peru]

DELGADO, C
VELÁZQUEZ, P
SÉNCHEZ, V
NÚÑEZ, W
2004

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The difficult information exchange and lack of uniform approaches, allowed the implementation of strategies by virtual interaction between pediatricians and Peruvian neonatologists through Internet. An e-mail list was organized through a free supplier with some members from the Neonatal Section of the Pediatric Society, who exchanged files and messages periodically, mainly on training events. The group was interviewed and the importance of information exchange among the members was verified

Tecnologías de la información y comunicaciones

MONTEAGUDO Peña, José Luis
2004

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Information and communication technologies are essential to support professional research activities in biomedicine and health. Their adoption and use is linked to efficiency and competitiveness. After needs analysis, ICTs applications whose use is recommended, are identified. Needs refer to activities linked to the execution of research projects but also to teaching, continuous training and professional development. Based on that, it is proposed a formative programme structure with different competence levels and with a combination of horizontal common general skills and vertical specialization areas. Finally, it is highlighted that new technologies facilitate new instruments but also they represent new working cultures and present new ethical and legal dilemmas to the researchers that would need to be educated in new working environments

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

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This site contains up-to-date information on progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap in health research. It includes reports from 1999, 2000, 2001/2002 and 2003/2004. The most recent, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

Tecnologías y Sistemas de Información al servicio de la salud|[Technologies and systems of information in health]

ARELLANO Rodríguez, Madelein
GAMBOA Cáceres, Teresa
2004

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The purpose of this article is to discuss the potential of the technologies of information in health and to characterise in a preliminary way the subsystems of information in health according to the nature of the information. Although the investigation is fundamentally bibliographical conceptual, it is based on an empirical study of the systems of information in two Venezuelan regions with local governments of different political orientation. Concludes that responsive systems of information in health should contain information coming from different sources: epidemiological, clinical, nutritional, sociodemographic, environmental and occupational, scientific-technique and administrative, and merit as much attention in health as administration of resources. Therefore, coordinated action of ministries of health is required with different institutions

Electronic immunisation registry and tracking system in Bangladesh

AHMED, M
2004

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This report summarises the 2001 development of a new computerised information system to register, schedule and track the immunisation of children, which was introduced by the Department of Public Health in Rajshahi City Corporation, Bangladesh. While no direct funding was provided for it, the assumed cost was not more than US $5000. The author concludes that system has been working well for the past three years. He also notes that the utilisation of ICTs in poor countries should be targeted at those intermediaries (such as health workers) who play a key role in the lives of the poor through high-contact service delivery. Empowering those workers and helping improve the effectiveness of their service delivery will do more for the poor than any number of e-government portals

The effectiveness of web-based vs non-web-based interventions : a meta-analysis of behavioural change outcomes

WANTLAND, D J
et al
2004

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The use of the Internet to deliver web-based interventions to patients is increasing rapidly. The use and effectiveness of web-based interventions to encourage an individual's change in behaviour compared to non-web-based interventions have not been substantially reviewed; hence this meta-analysis was undertaken. This article presents a systematic review of web-based therapies intended to encourage an individual's behaviour change. Sixteen of seventeen included studies revealed the outcomes of improved knowledge and/or improved behavioural outcomes for participants using web-based interventions. Outcomes included increased exercise time, knowledge of nutritional status, slower health decline

Rights of the girl child [whole issue]

COMMUNICATION FOR HEALTH INDIA NETWORK (CHIN) SECRETARIAT
January 2004

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This issue of CHIN News focuses on the survival rights of girls, gender discrimination in India, the social and health implications of discrimnation, and strategies for action to address this issue

2004 report on the global AIDS epidemic

WOODS, Sandra
Ed
2004

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This annual report takes an overall look at the global AIDS epidemic. It considers the impact of HIV and AIDS on people and societies and includes a particular focus on the orphans and vulnerable children. It takes a further look at scaling up HIV prevention initiatives, with considerations about the threat of HIV to young people. There is a look at treatment, care and support for people living with HIV. It also takes into account the notion of human rights and protection. There are finally some considerations of the financing of responses to the crisis, and the need to coordinate national responses to HIV and AIDS. There is a table fo useful information on country specific estimates and data relating to HIV and AIDS

2004 report on the global AIDS epidemic

WOODS, Sandra
Ed
2004

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This annual report takes an overall look at the global AIDS epidemic. It considers the impact of HIV and AIDS on people and societies and includes a particular focus on the orphans and vulnerable children. It takes a further look at scaling up HIV prevention initiatives, with considerations about the threat of HIV to young people. There is a look at treatment, care and support for people living with HIV. It also takes into account the notion of human rights and protection. There are finally some considerations of the financing of responses to the crisis, and the need to coordinate national responses to HIV and AIDS. There is a table fo useful information on country specific estimates and data relating to HIV and AIDS

Building information systems in health care : a reference guide for health care decision-makers

PESTIC, Ozren
2004

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This manual aims to introduce the reader to the subject of medical informatics - specifically how to build information systems in various health care settings. Although some parts of the manual present detailed knowledge of specific applications tailored to technical specialists, the overall purpose is to provide those involved in the development of information systems with a framework that will assist in the planning and design process

Application of ICT in strengthening health information systems in developing countries in the wake of globalisation

SIMBA, Daudi O
2004

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The last decades saw developing countries taking action to strengthen and modernise their health management information systems (HMIS) using the existing ICT. Due to poor economic and communication infrastructure, the process has been limited to national and provincial/region levels leaving behind majority of health workers living in remote/rural areas. The author notes that strategies to improve data quality and utilisation should be instituted to ensure that HMIS has positive impact on people's health; otherwise, advancement in ICT will continue to marginalise health workers in developing countries especially those living in remote areas

Upscaling Community Conversations in Ethiopia 2004 : unleashing capacities of communities for the HIV/AIDS response

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
2004

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This document focuses on the Community Conversations (CC) process - a component of UNDP's Leadership for Results Programme - in Ethiopia, and outlines both key aspects of the methodology and key results from its implementation in Alaba, SNNPR and Yabelo, Oromiya. The approach, using the expertise of skilled facilitators, aims to encourage people to talk openly to each other about the implications of HIV and AIDS in their communities, and to rethink cultural norms, community values and health behaviours in their relations to the disease. Some early results from Community Conversations include: communities taking responsibility for their own prevention; communities discontinuing traditional practices found to be harmful in the context of HIV and AIDS; communities able to influence local governments; communities using their own social resources to support children affected by AIDS, and orphans in particular; communities sharing their learning with other communities. The document outlines a strategy for upscaling community conversations, and looks in particular at issues around implementation and coordination, funding and mechanisms to address needs that may be identified during the CC process

Guidelines on developing consumer information on proper use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine

FALKENBERG,Torkel
HOK, Johanna
SCHONSTROM, Suzanna
2004

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These guidelines offer an overview of the general principles and activities necessary for the development of reliable consumer information about traditional, complementary and alternative medicine. Aimed at governments and other stakeholders, they would also be a useful reference on the information consumers need to guide them when seeking a safe and effective therapy

ICT and health [chapter] | ICT and MDGs : a World Bank Group perspective

WORLD BANK GROUP
December 2003

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This article explores the impact of ICTs on health care within developing countries. Topics covered include research and training of health-care workers, achieving health-related MDGs, and storing and disseminating health information. Details are also provided of selected World Bank-funded projects

Sociocultural explanations for delays in careseeking for pneumonia

CENTRE FOR HEALTH AND POPULATION RESEARCH
December 2003

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This article is printed in the Health and Science Bulletin produced by the Centre for Health and Population Research, based in Bangladesh. It outlines research conducted among parents in Matlab, Bangladesh, revealing how their beliefs affect household treatment of childhood pneumonia and influence delays in seeking care from trained providers. Many indigenous beliefs and social factors prevent primary care providers, particularly mothers, of pneumonia cases from obtaining prompt and appropriate help. For example, in fear of being blamed for poor caring practices, mothers are reluctant to share information about the illness with other family members. Intervention strategies designed to reduce child mortality associated with pneumonia need to address the cultural beliefs and challenges. Efforts should focus on involving family members such as the child's father or grandmother in early recognition of pneumonia cases. It also suggests that health workers use local terminology and cultural knowledge to communicate the need for prompt treatment with a trained provider

How high is infant mortality in Central and Eastern Europe and the CIS?

ALESHINA, Nadezhda
REDMOND, Gerry
November 2003

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Official statistics seem to suggest that in post-communist Europe infant mortality rates have significantly decreased through the 1990s. As infant mortality rate is a key indicator of the Millennium Development Goals, reliable measurement is crucial to assess progress. This paper argues that official counts may understate the gravity of the problem in at least 15 countries in the region. This may be due to unclear definitions of 'live birth' and 'stillbirth', misreporting of infant deaths, nonregistration of births or deaths. The paper also discusses the uncertainties associated with survey based estimates, and call for further work to be done to improve collection of data and effectiveness of surveys

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