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The WHO Reproductive Health Library

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Special Programme of Research, Development & Research Training in Human Reproduction
2005

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This CD-ROM is targetted at health care professionals and assists them in understanding research evidence, making decisions about best practice, and establishing implementation procedures to assure the change. It contains editorials, articles on research, research synthesis and methodology, summaries of beneficial and harmful forms of care, systematic reviews and commentaries, implementation aids, registers of funding agencies and NGOs involved in reproductive health, and links to websites about research and research synthesis. This edition includes 13 new Cochrane Reviews (bringing the total to 101), and corresponding commentaries and practical recommendations. This issue includes a new video on 'Vacuum extraction for assisted vaginal delivery'.

Managing knowledge in health services

BOOTH, Andrew
WALTON, Graham
2000

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This book examines the role of information management in health care. It is not specifically about developing countries, but parts may be relevant to evolving health care systems and information services in development. Part 1 looks at the context within which health care is delivered and examines the different users who have access to the knowledge base; Part 2 outlines the principles underlying the way health information resources and services are organized and managed; and Part 3 discusses the skills required to use the knowledge base effectively. Within this structure, individual chapters cover issues of particular relevance, such as marketing the information service, training the users, sources of health knowledge and searching the knowledge base

Changing home treatment of childhood fevers by training shop keepers in rural Kenya

MARSH, V M
et al
May 1999

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Malaria control in Africa relies primarily on early effective treatment for clinical disease, but most early treatments for fever occur through self-medication with shop-bought drugs. Lack of information to community members on over-the-counter drug use has led to widespread ineffective treatment of fevers, increased risks of drug toxicity and accelerating drug resistance. This study examined the feasibility and measured the likely impact of training shop keepers in rural Africa on community drug use. It concludes that this approach is both feasible and likely to have a significant impact

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