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2015 global reference list of 100 core health indicators

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2015

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“The Global Reference List of 100 Core Health Indicators is a standard set of 100 indicators prioritized by the global community to provide concise information on the health situation and trends, including responses at national and global levels. It contains indicators of relevance to country, regional and global reporting across the spectrum of global health priorities relating to the post-2015 health goals of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These include the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) agenda, new and emerging priorities such as noncommunicable diseases, universal health coverage and other issues in the post-2015 development agenda.”

Insecticide resistance and malaria control : current trends in research

KULKARNI, Manisha
April 2006

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This article outlines current trends in malaria research. Recent research studies, here briefly reviewed, have focused on the molecular scale of resistance in Anopheles, geographical scale of resistance in Africa, impact of insecticide-treated nets (ITN) in host-seeking vectors, implications of resistance for malaria control, pyrethroids and alternative insecticides, and on new initiatives to fast track the development of improved insecticides

Tackle malaria today : give tomorrow a chance

MEEK, Sylvia
WHITTY, Christopher
LINES, Jo
et al
2005

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Every year malaria causes up to three million deaths, and if attempts to control the pandemic fail, drug-resistant malaria will spread even further. This report provides key statistics about the disease and makes a case for an effective and internationally coordinated response to the crisis, which should include drugs development, use of insecticide, increased funding, investment in the delivery systems and human resources and the involvement of the private sector

Participation of African social scientists in malaria control : identifying enabling and constraining factors

NGALAME, Paulyne M
et al
December 2004

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This article discusses research examining the enabling and constraining factors that influence African social scientists' involvement in malaria control. Findings showed that most participants did not necessarily seek malaria as a career path. Having a mentor who provided research and training opportunities, and developing strong technical skills in malaria control and grant or proposal writing facilitated career opportunities in malaria. A paucity of jobs and funding and inadequate technical skills in malaria limited the type and number of opportunities available to social scientists in malaria control. Understanding the factors that influence job satisfaction, recruitment and retention in malaria control is necessary for better integration of social scientists into malaria control. However, given the wide array of skills that social scientists have and the variety of deadly diseases competing for attention in sub-Saharan Africa, it might be more cost effective to employ social scientists to work broadly on issues common to communicable diseases in general rather than solely on malaria

Reducing malaria's impact on child health, development and survival

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Roll Back Malaria
2002

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A concise publication on reducing the incidence of malaria among children. It provides some useful background facts on childhood mortality and other consequences such as low birth weight, anaemia, epilepsy, and learning difficulties. It then describes the tools to 'roll back malaria': insecticide-treated bednets, intermittent preventative treatment, antimalarial drug combination therapy, improving access to treatment, and strengthening health infrastructure

Community involvement in malaria control and prevention [Chapter 8] | Malaria control during mass population movements and natural disasters

2002

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This chapter considers malaria control in displaced populations and in the context of complex emergencies, and places community participation (reflecting both understanding and acceptability of interventions) at the centre of both prevention and control of malaria. It finds that the sociocultural context surrounding displacement situations needs to be considered when designing malaria control interventions, and that treatment-seeking behaviours are complex and poorly understood in the context of complex emergencies. It offers suggestions in assessing needs and gathering information to inform project planning

Lives at risk : malaria and pregnancy

MALARIA AND PREGNANCY NETWORK (MPNet)
2001

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This brochure was developed to promote awareness of the impact of malaria on pregnant women and its potential impact on their newborns, and to influence reproductive health professionals, programme managers and policy makers to consider the implementation of interventions to reduce malaria impact. It has been designed to inform and advocate for recognition of the effects of malaria in pregnancy and strategies for mitigating those effects

Maintenance and sustained use of insecticide-treated bednets and curtains three years after a controlled trial in western Kenya

KACHUR, S Patrick
et al
November 1999

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While few questions remain about the efficacy of insecticide-treated materials (ITM) intervention, operational issues around how to implement and sustain ITM projects need attention. This article describes a study of the results of a small-scale ITM intervention trial, 3 years after the project ended, to assess how local attitudes and practices had changed

Insecticide-treated curtains reduce the prevalence and intensity of malaria infection in Burkina Faso

HABLUETZEL, A
et al
August 1999

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Describes a large, randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of insecticide-treated curtains (ITC) on child mortality that was conducted in an area of seasonal, holoendemic malaria in Burkina Faso. Concludes that widespread implementation of ITC in this area of high malaria transmission led to a modest reduction in the prevalence of malaria infection and to a more substantial reduction in the intensity of these infections which caused increased Hb levels

Changing home treatment of childhood fevers by training shop keepers in rural Kenya

MARSH, V M
et al
May 1999

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Malaria control in Africa relies primarily on early effective treatment for clinical disease, but most early treatments for fever occur through self-medication with shop-bought drugs. Lack of information to community members on over-the-counter drug use has led to widespread ineffective treatment of fevers, increased risks of drug toxicity and accelerating drug resistance. This study examined the feasibility and measured the likely impact of training shop keepers in rural Africa on community drug use. It concludes that this approach is both feasible and likely to have a significant impact

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