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TT Tracker app aims to improve surgical outcomes and patient care

JENSEN, Kimberley
et al
November 2019

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Trichiasis (TT) operations are generally conducted in remote and resource-poor settings, which can make it difficult to follow-up and assess surgical outcomes. Sightsavers developed an Android-based mobile phone application, called the TT Tracker, which helps surgeons, assistants and supervisors to collect and analyse information about surgical outcomes and performance, and to determine when and where follow-up appointments are required. 

 

Community Eye Health. 2019; 31(104): 93.

Evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of the ‘Care for Stroke’ intervention in India, a smartphone-enabled, carer-supported, educational intervention for management of disability following stroke

SURESHKUMAR, K
MURTHY, G V S
NATARAJAN, S
GOENKA, S
KUPER, H
February 2016

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This study aimed to identify operational issues encountered by study participants in using the ‘Care for Stroke’ intervention and to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. ‘Care for Stroke’ is a smartphone-enabled, educational intervention for management of physical disabilities following stroke. It is delivered through a web-based, smartphone enabled application (app). It includes inputs from stroke rehabilitation experts in a digitised format. Sixty stroke survivors discharged from hospital in Chennai, South India, and their caregivers participated in the study. The preliminary intervention was field-tested with 30 stroke survivors for 2 weeks. The finalised intervention was provided to a further 30 stroke survivors to be used in their homes with support from their carers for 4 weeks. Field-testing identified operational difficulties related to connectivity, video-streaming, picture clarity, quality of videos, and functionality of the application. Assessment was carried out by direct observation and short interview questionnaires. 

 

 

Improving health, connecting people : the role of ICTs in the health sector of developing countries|A framework paper

CHETLEY, Andrew
Ed
May 2006

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This paper gives a snapshot of the types of information and communication technology (ICT) interventions being used in the health sector, and the policy debates involving ICTs and health. It draws on the experiences of both the North and South, but focuses on applicability in the South to identify the most effective and relevant uses of ICTs. It describes the major constraints and challenges faced in using ICTs effectively in the health sector of developing countries, draws out good practices for using ICTs in the health sector, identifies major players and stakeholders, and highlights priority needs and issues of relevance to policy makers. The paper also looks at emerging trends in technologies that are likely to shape ICT use in the health sector, and identifies gaps in knowledge. It is aimed at policy makers, international donors, local practitioners, and others who are involved in the development or management of programs in the health sector in developing countries

ICT in the health sector : literature review

DAVIES, Jackie
March 2006

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This literature review presents a brief survey of the materials that have been selected for presentation as part of the InfoDev supported ‘ICT & Health’ research project. These materials are presented online as a searchable annotated bibliography: http://asksource.ids.ac.uk/cf/keylists/keylist2.cfm?topic=ict&search=QL_infodevHealthComm05JD

Is cybermedicine killing you? The story of a Cochrane disaster

EYSENBACH, Gunther
KUMMERVOLD, Per Egil
2005

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This editorial briefly reviews the series of events that led to the publication, dissemination and eventual retraction of a flawed Cochrane systematic review on interactive health communication applications (IHCAs), which was widely reported in the media with headlines such as 'Internet Makes Us Sick', 'Knowledge May Be Hazardous to Web Consumers' Health', 'Too Much Advice Can Be Bad for Your Health', 'Click to Get Sick?' and even 'Is Cybermedicine Killing You?'. The authors show that while the media attention helped to speed up the identification of errors, leading to a retraction of the review after only 13 days, a paper subsequently published by Rada shows that the retraction, in contrast to the original review, remained largely unnoticed by the public. The authors examine the three flaws of the review and then discuss 'retraction ethics' for researchers, editors/publishers and journalists, making recommendations for the future

Access to health information

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2005

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This Key list highlights essential information resources on access to health information. Resources have been selected and reviewed by experts in the field. Any study of access in ICT and health should include a background analysis on digital divide issues generally; then a specific focus on access to health information delivered via ICT -- for health practitioners, researchers and for the public. ICTs present a significant tool for sharing information within various constituencies in the health sector. They also present the opportunity for health professionals in developing countries to access a wide range of medical journals online. Delivery of medical assistance via ICTs make access by the public a key issue

Piloting paperless data entry for clinical research in Africa

MISSINOU, M A
OLOLA, C H,
ISSIFOU, S
et al
2005

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The study compared the accuracy of data entry using the current standard practice (a paper-based case report form with double data entry) with that using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in a clinical study in rural Gabon. The paperless systems functioned smoothly and no data were lost. The clinicians involved in this study preferred the handheld computers, and their use will be considered in future studies in an African clinical research network

An electronic medical record system for ambulatory care of HIV-infected patients in Kenya

SIIKA, A M
et al
2005

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The faculty at Moi University in Kenya and Indiana University in the USA opened adult and pediatric HIV clinics in a national referral hospital, a district hospital, and six rural health centers in western Kenya using a newly developed electronic medical record system (EMR) to support comprehensive outpatient HIV/AIDS care. The EMR contains more than 30,000 visit records for more than 4,000 patients, almost half taking antiretroviral drugs. This article describes the development and structure of this EMR and plans for future development that include wireless connections, tablet computers, and migration to a Web-based platform

Health information technology in primary health care in developing countries : a literature review

TOMASI, E
FACCHINI, L A
MAIA MDE, F
November 2004

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This study explores the debate and initiatives concerning the use of information technology (IT) in primary health care in developing countries. The literature from 1992-2002 was identified from searches of the MEDLINE, Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature Database (LILACS), Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases. For the analysis of advantages, problems and perspectives of IT applications and systems, 52 articles were selected according to their potential contribution to the primary health care processes in non-developed countries. countries. These included: 10 on electronic patient registries (EPR), 22 on process and programmatic action evaluation and management systems (PPAEM) and 20 on clinical decision-support systems (CDS). The main advantages, limitations and perspectives are discussed

World youth report 2003 : the global situation of young people

UNITED NATIONS. Department for Economic and Social Affairs
Ed
2004

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Overall, young people today are better off than previous generations, but many are still severely hindered by a lack of education, poverty, health risks, unemployment and the impact of conflict. The World Youth Report 2003 provides an overview of the global situation of young people. The first ten chapters focus on the priority areas of education, employment, extreme poverty, health issues, the environment, drugs, delinquency, leisure time, the situation of girls and young women, and youth participation in decision-making as identified by the World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY) adopted by the General Assembly in 1995. The remaining five chapters address some of the newer issues that were later identified as additional priorities for youth and were adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2003

Tecnologías de la información y comunicaciones

MONTEAGUDO Peña, José Luis
2004

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Information and communication technologies are essential to support professional research activities in biomedicine and health. Their adoption and use is linked to efficiency and competitiveness. After needs analysis, ICTs applications whose use is recommended, are identified. Needs refer to activities linked to the execution of research projects but also to teaching, continuous training and professional development. Based on that, it is proposed a formative programme structure with different competence levels and with a combination of horizontal common general skills and vertical specialization areas. Finally, it is highlighted that new technologies facilitate new instruments but also they represent new working cultures and present new ethical and legal dilemmas to the researchers that would need to be educated in new working environments

Electronic immunisation registry and tracking system in Bangladesh

AHMED, M
2004

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This report summarises the 2001 development of a new computerised information system to register, schedule and track the immunisation of children, which was introduced by the Department of Public Health in Rajshahi City Corporation, Bangladesh. While no direct funding was provided for it, the assumed cost was not more than US $5000. The author concludes that system has been working well for the past three years. He also notes that the utilisation of ICTs in poor countries should be targeted at those intermediaries (such as health workers) who play a key role in the lives of the poor through high-contact service delivery. Empowering those workers and helping improve the effectiveness of their service delivery will do more for the poor than any number of e-government portals

Building information systems in health care : a reference guide for health care decision-makers

PESTIC, Ozren
2004

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This manual aims to introduce the reader to the subject of medical informatics - specifically how to build information systems in various health care settings. Although some parts of the manual present detailed knowledge of specific applications tailored to technical specialists, the overall purpose is to provide those involved in the development of information systems with a framework that will assist in the planning and design process

Application of ICT in strengthening health information systems in developing countries in the wake of globalisation

SIMBA, Daudi O
2004

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The last decades saw developing countries taking action to strengthen and modernise their health management information systems (HMIS) using the existing ICT. Due to poor economic and communication infrastructure, the process has been limited to national and provincial/region levels leaving behind majority of health workers living in remote/rural areas. The author notes that strategies to improve data quality and utilisation should be instituted to ensure that HMIS has positive impact on people's health; otherwise, advancement in ICT will continue to marginalise health workers in developing countries especially those living in remote areas

ICT and health [chapter] | ICT and MDGs : a World Bank Group perspective

WORLD BANK GROUP
December 2003

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This article explores the impact of ICTs on health care within developing countries. Topics covered include research and training of health-care workers, achieving health-related MDGs, and storing and disseminating health information. Details are also provided of selected World Bank-funded projects

Implementing a new health management information system in Uganda

GLADWIN, J
DIXON, R A
WILSON, T D
June 2003

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The paper reviews the installation of a new health management system in Uganda. The authors noted that technological issues, rather than wider organisational issues, dominated the planning of the change. The need to consider the organisational context when changing information systems arises because the process is more complex than some practitioners have realised. It is a useful case study of the implementation of information and communication technology

Evaluating computerised health information systems : hard lessons still to be learnt

LITTLEJOHNS, Peter
WYATT, Jeremy C
GARVICAN, Linda
2003

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This article discusses the implementation of a hospital information system in Limpopo Province, South Africa and describes how it failed because of inadequate infrastructure and problems with the functioning of the system itself. Furthermore, users were not made sufficiently aware of the purpose of a computerised system and failed to appreciate the complexity of implementation and of the healthcare process. The paper calls for a better understanding of the unique nature of hospital information systems and for well designed evaluation to be built into the contracts from the beginning

Information and communication technology in cardiovascular disease prevention in developing countries : hype and hope. Report of the International Collaboration on Information Use in Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Developing Countries

JABBOUR, S
et al
2003

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This article reviews the developments relating to the use of information and communication technology for the dissemination of information about cardiovascular disease prevention in developing countries. The experience of these initiatives suggests that, while information technology holds great potential, there are many potential perils, such as the widening global information gap, inequitable access, and irrelevant information

Use of a computerized tuberculosis register for automated generation of case finding, sputum conversion, and treatment outcome reports

VRANKEN, R
et al
February 2002

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The article describes the 'Electronic TB Register', a user-friendly, Epi-Info based software programme based on the WHO/IUATLD format of recording and reporting. Individual records from the TB registry are entered in a program that provides interactive support. Factors critical for success include a functioning, paper-based system, involvement of staff from the TB programme, health information systems, and health facilities, ongoing training, and backup support

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