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Study on explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes in Iraq

NIJHOLT, Sarah
April 2019

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Handicap International (HI) commissioned a study on on explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes in Iraq. The overall objectives of the study were to:

  • Understand what explosive hazard victim reporting and data management processes exist in Iraq;
  • Identify who is collecting such information, for which reasons and how it is being shared, and how it is being officially used;
  • Identify whether international victim data collection good practices and reporting standards are being followed up, and make concrete recommendations to help meet the standards;
  • Understand the successes, shortfalls, and challenges in data collection and information sharing;
  • Identify the needs of the data collection community in terms of ensuring sufficient victim reporting and data collection;
  • Identify if and how the data on victims is being collected and used by government authorities and the international fora.

 

Desk research was carried out and data collection took place in March 2019 in Erbil, Baghdad and Ninewa governorates in Iraq. In total, the qualitative researcher spent 3 days in Erbil, 4 days in Baghdad, and 6 days in Ninewa governorate to conduct interviews through a snowball approach. In total, 22 interviews were conducted with a variety of stakeholders, including humanitarian mine action actors, government officials, hospital directors, police and community leaders. This report provides an overview of the main findings.

Enabling a Global Human Rights Movement for Women and Girls with Disabilities: Global Disabled Women's Rights Advocacy Report

WOMEN ENABLED INTERNATIONAL INC.
2016

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WEI's Report is the first-ever report and map and it includes data, analysis and infographics of the leaders, venues, and locations where women's disability rights advocates and organizations are especially active, where the gaps are, and where there are opportunities for collaboration, and helps in achieving greater collective impact.

An overwhelmingly clear finding from the Report is that the growing number of disabled women and their organizations working for the rights of women and girls with disabilities is increasingly passionate, energetic and committed to this urgent effort. Furthermore, these women want to work collaboratively, share a desire to enhance their skills and demand their rights unequivocally. These findings form the basis for the development of enhanced mechanisms for collaboration and significantly increased funding for these organizations and this important work.

Through an online survey launched on August 18, 2015 and interviews conducted in January and February 2016, WEI produces this comprehensive mapping report of the field of advocates for the rights of women and girls with disabilities globally and nationally, released on March 8, 2016, International Women's Day.”

Operationalizing the 2030 agenda : ways forward to improve monitoring and evaluation of disability inclusion

UNITED NATIONS DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFIARS (UNDESA)
2015

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This note concerns monitoring and evaluation of disability and inclusion in light of the sustainable development goals. The note identifies steps which can be taken by individual countries and the international community as a whole to address the gaps in data disaggregation and collection concerning people with disabilities. The note concludes with a discussion of possible ways forward for better monitoring and evaluation for disability inclusion in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Inequalities relating to health and the life course : disability, mental Illness and older age

SAMMAN, Emma
RODRIGUEZ-TACKEUCHI, Laura
November 2012

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"Issues related to early childhood feature prominently in the MDG framework (as do malnutrition, HIV status and malaria), and data collection in these areas is fairly advanced. Other sources of inequality are notable by their virtual absence - among these, older age, disability and mental illness, although these issues each appear to affect sizeable numbers of particularly vulnerable people throughout the world. A clear obstacle to ‘mainstreaming’ these sources of inequality in a new post-2015 agreement is the widespread lack of nationally representative internationally comparable data. This could arise from definitional or technical issues (what to measure and/or how), operational issues (e.g., resource or capacity constraints), attitudinal issues (relating to stigma) and/or lack of demand from data users. Greater attention is needed to explore these constraints and how they might be overcome. To this end, this paper discusses currently available data and its limitations, constraints to better data collection and efforts needed to adjust key international survey instruments- the World Bank’s Core Welfare Indicator Questionnaire (CWIQ) and Living Standards and Measurement Survey (LSMS), Macro International’s Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and the UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) - to collect reliable data on these sources of inequality, alongside other household indicators"
Note: Accepted under the "Addressing Inequalities" Global Thematic Consultation - Call for Proposals for Background Papers, Oct 2012

Knowledge, attitudes and practices for risk education : how to implement KAP surveys

GOUTILLE, Fabienne
2009

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This manual provides a six-step, practical guidance for conducting a KAP (knowledge, attitudes and practices) survey on landmines and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW). It highlights the KAP theoretical structure, provides practical suggestions and a list of useful resources. This document is useful for people interested in conducting KAP surveys on landmines and Explosive Remnants of War

Understanding and interpreting disability as measured using the WG short set of questions

WASHINGTON GROUP ON DISABILITY STATISTICS (WG)
2009

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This report presents information about understanding and interpreting disability as measured using the Washington group (WG)’s short set of questions. The six questions are for use in censuses and surveys according to the Fundamental Principles of Official Statistics and are consistent with the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). The questions produce internationally comparable data on disability by identifying the majority of persons in the population who are at greater risk than the general population of experiencing limited or restricted participation in society. The questions cover six functional domains or basic actions: seeing, hearing, walking, cognition, self-care, and communication. This resource is useful to anyone interested in measuring disability

Measuring medicine prices, availability, affordability and price components

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
HEALTH ACTION INTERNATIONAL (HAI)
2008

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This manual is to help governments, civil society groups and others concerned about the prices of medicines to collect and analyse: medicine prices (patient prices and government procurement prices) across sectors and regions in a country; medicine availability; treatment affordability; and all price components in the supply chain from manufacturer to patient (taxes, mark-ups etc.). It is accompanied by a CD-ROM which contains a more extensive collection resources and tools, such as sample training materials, frequently asked questions, and a report template for use in developing national survey reports

Approaching the measurement of disability prevalence : the case of Zambia

LOEB, Mitchell E
EIDE, Arne H
MONT, Daniel
January 2008

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"Results from a national, representative survey of living conditions among people with disabilities in Zambia based, in part, on the work of the Washington Group on Disability Statistics (WG) that operationalises a functional approach to disability are presented and contrasted with historical census data to illustrate how a flexible approach to the measurement of disability is better suited to the multiple purposes of collecting disability statistics and to the diversity of disability in a population"
Alter, European Journal of Disability Research, Vol 2, No 1

NI 54 : services for disabled children

SOLUTIONS4INCLUSION
May 2007

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This factsheet describes how an indicator for services for disabled children will be developed in the UK. The indicator will be based on an achieved sample of a minimum of 200 parents of disabled children in each local area using surveys. The survey will be used to calculate a national baseline indicator and produce a report. Details are provided for the associated toolkit, reports and related project links

Measuring health and disability

MONT, Daniel
May 2007

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This article examines the use of Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), an indicator for assessing the relative effects of public health interventions, by comparing the underlying concepts to WHO’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). It concludes by stating "the main difficulty with DALYs is that they do not value interventions that enhance the lives of people with disabilities. To do so, they must draw on the social model of disability to look at how the environment interacts with functional status"
The Lancet, Vol 369

Testing a disability schedule for census 2011 : summary report on 26 focus groups

SCHNEIDER, Margie
COUPER, Jacqui
February 2007

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“"This study uses a series of 26 focus groups to examine the nature of responses to a proposed set of questions developed by the Washington Group on Disability Statistics for use in Censuses. The South African study is aimed at testing these questions with the specific view of using them in the Census 2011. These questions consist of six core questions relating to difficulties people have in doing a series of activities including seeing, hearing, walking and climbing stairs, remembering and concentrating, self-care and communicating. The South African set of questions included a further question on difficulties people have in participating in community activities like anyone else"

The definition and measurement of disability : the work of the Washington Group (continued)

MONT, Daniel
November 2006

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This presentation presents three methods of disability data collection: one method that highlights cognitive testing undertaken in 15 countries to ensure validity and to better understand how questions operate; another method which field tested the Washington Group questions versus extended questions in two countries to ensure internal consistency; and a SINTEF study in Zambia. It concludes with specific recommendations about disability data collection. It would be useful for people interested in the definition and measurement of disability

Best practices in scaling up case study : Uganda, using a simple survey method for evidence-based decision making at the district level

NSABAGASANI, Xavier
et al
2006

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This document provides a case study of the Uganda Program for Human and Holistic Development (UPHOLD), and its use of the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) survey method. LQAS is used to collect district and sub-district data. This document highlights its importance, the country context before LQAS, the methodology behind it, results, steps in the scale-up process, best practice, lessons learned and challenges. The Ugandan government is currently considering expanding use of the LQAS into every district

Conducting surveys on disability : a comprehensive toolkit

BAKHSHI, Parul
TRANI, Jean-Francois
ROLLAND, Cecile
2006

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This comprehensive toolkit gives the basis for the design and implementation of household surveys. It is designed for those interested in understanding disability within a specific social, political, cultural and religious context. The six sections of this document outline how to design, conduct and analyse a survey which focuses on similar issues. Topics in these sections include: understanding the socio-economic context in order to determine the survey objectives, training the interviewers team and conducting field operations to collect the data. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in data collection, surveys and disability and development

The employment of persons with disabilities : evidence from national sample survey

MITRA, Sophie
SAMBAMOORTHI, Usha
December 2005

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"This paper reports on the employment of persons with disabilities in India based on recent data from the National Sample Survey. The study shows that the employment rate of persons with disabilities is relatively low compared to that of the all India working age population, with great variations across gender, urban/rural sectors and state. A multivariate analysis suggests that employment among persons with disabilities is influenced more by individual and household characteristics than human capital"

Using qualitative methods in studying the link between disability and poverty : developing a methodology and pilot testing in Kenya

GRUT, Lisbet
INGSTAD, Benedicte
June 2005

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"The report introduces a methodology for qualitative studies on disability and poverty. The purpose of the methodological approach is to uncover the mechanisms by which various types of impairments interact with barriers in the environment, to limit or influence the economic and social life of people with disabilities and members of their households. The pilot study was carried out in Kenya, and shows that the methodological tool is well suited to this type of studies"

HIV/AIDS and disability: capturing hidden voices. Global survey on HIV/AIDS and disability

GROCE, Nora
April 2004

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This is a report of the global survey carried out by the Yale School of Public Health and the World Bank, into the research, policies and programmes that concern the impact of HIV/AIDS on disabled people. The report outlines the research methods used and the findings of the research. It concludes that HIV/AIDS represents a significant threat to disabled individuals and populations around the globe, at rates at least comparable to and quite possibly significantly higher than those affecting the general public. Moreover, findings from the survey clearly document that individuals with disability are not included in most AIDS outreach efforts

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