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Inclusive and integrated HIV and AIDS programming

MAC-SEING, Muriel
March 2012

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"This policy brief is an introduction to Handicap International’s 2012 Policy Paper "Inclusive and integrated HIV and AIDS programming". Handicap International promotes an inclusive approach to improving quality of life and access to services for persons with disabilities. This means that basic health care and socioeconomic services are developed according to the principle of Universal Access, where all people with impairments (whether physical, sensory, intellectual or mental), have equal access and opportunities for participation. This inclusive approach also ensures that gender considerations and disparities are acknowledged as a cross-cutting issue"
Policy brief No 7

HIV and AIDS services worldwide

BEAUMONT, Sylvie
April 2009

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This directory lists contact details and service profiles of over 2,200 organisations working in the HIV and AIDS fields in 189 countries throughout the world. It aims to foster the sharing of skills, information and expertise. The directory lists international, national and regional organisations, as well as international networks, treatment centres, key specialist agencies and research units linked to community-based projects. The information is indexed both by organisation name and category of work, and is presented in four languages: English, Spanish, French and Portuguese. A CD-ROM version is included, and the information in this directory is searchable on NAM's on-line database at www.aidsmap.com

Coordination for vulnerable children : Alliance Zambia’s efforts to strengthen government and community OVC systems

ALLIANCE FOR COMMUNITY ACTION ON HEALTH IN ZAMBIA (Alliance Zambia)
2009

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Based on its experience of implementing a programme to strengthen community support systems for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC), Alliance Zambia sees coordination within government, and partnership between government and civil society, as essential building blocks for effective OVC support

Educator development and support

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
March 2008

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Limited attention has been given to helping educators to deal with the new challenges posed by the epidemic. Even less attention has been given to protecting educators from HIV infection and to providing care, treatment and support for educators infected with or affected by HIV and AIDS. There are also very few programmes addressing the needs of other education sector personnel, such as planners, managers and support staff. This booklet looks at educator development and support; educator conduct; and prevention, care, treatment and support of infected and affected eduators

HIV & AIDS and supportive learning environments

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION (UNESCO)
2008

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This booklet addresses the following issues for learners: - Rights and access to education - Protection - Knowledge, attitudes and skills - Care and support Schools and other educational settings play an important role in educating young people about HIV and AIDS, developing the skills they need to protect themselves from HIV infection, tackling fear, stigma and discrimination and promoting care and support of those who are infected with and affected by HIV and AIDS

Missing the target #4 : time is running out to end AIDS - treatment and prevention for all!

INTERNATIONAL TREATMENT PREPAREDNESS COALITION (ITPC)
July 2007

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This report provides research from 17 countries to support the case that efforts to ensure universal access to treatment for HIV and AIDS are maintained and accelerated; that supplementary services are also provided free at the point of access; that there is increased investment in health care workers; and co-ordinated policy reforms. It also recommends that donors ensure sustainable funding for treatment programmes and identifies areas of weaknesses in global programmes. In addition, it provides focus reports for Cambodia, China, Malawi, Uganda, Zimbabwe and Zambia; brief updates on countries previously reported on: Dominican Republic, Kenya, Nigeria, India, Russia and South Africa; and short summaries on Argentina, Belize, Cameroon, Malaysia and Morocco

Services for care, treatment and support of people living with HIV

HOPE, Ruth
2007

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This paper considers why the services offered to people with HIV are different to other health services because of the need continuity of care and to encompass aspects of peoples lives beyond clinical care, including: social and spiritual needs, economic needs, food and nutrition needs, legal needs. It looks at the role of health care workers and the need for a care plan that encompasses the family

Weak promise on HIV/AIDS [whole issue]

August 2006

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This issue focuses on HIV and AIDS and ageing and considers the effects of the epidemic on the elderly. Articles look at how parents provide care during illness to their children with little formal support in Cambodia, explore the experience of older people affected by HIV in dealing with grief in Tanzania, and report on the work of 'Empathy clubs' for older women caring for children with HIV in Vietnam

Where the heart is : meeting the psychosocial needs of young children in the context of HIV/AIDS

RICHTER, Linda
FOSTER, Geoff
SHERR, Lorraine
July 2006

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[Publisher's abstract]: An output of a series of workshops on psychosocial support held in 2004-2005 by the Bernard van Leer Foundation and the Coalition on Children Affected by AIDS. Authors Linda Richter, Geoff Foster and Lorraine Sherr discuss the issues surrounding psychosocial care and support for children made vulnerable by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and make recommendations for future priorities and programming directions. Includes the "Call To Action" for Toronto 2006

Healthy babies, happy mothers : prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Training manual

CAMEROON BAPTIST CONVENTION HEALTH BOARD
May 2006

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This is a comprehensive manual on prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. It is designed to help meet the needs of both the mother and the child in all critical stages of maternity and perinatal care. Places a great emphasis on psychological support and counselling, to enable HIV-positive mothers to make informed decisions and healthy choices. Include an overview of key mother-to-child transmission issues. Topics discussed also include: basic principles of HIV counseling; voluntary counseling and testing; confidentiality; instructions for nevirapine treatment of HIV-infected mothers and for HIV-infected mothers during antenatal, labor, delivery, and postnatal periods; counseling and support for safer infant feeding; follow-up and care of an infant born to an HIV-positive mother; follow-up and care of an HIV-positive mother; PMTCT support groups; laboratory HIV testing; universal precautions; PMTCT programme supervision and monitoring; reporting and management information system (MIS). This training manual is intended as a tool for health care workers who desire to know more about HIV and to help train counsellors who work in PMTCT centers

Memory work [whole issue]

June 2005

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This issue of Medicus Mundi Schweiz Bulletin is devoted to memory work. Articles describe the evolution of memory books and memory work; NACWOLA’s experiences in Uganda; scaling up memory work; and related projects and tools such as hero books and the Ten Million Memories Project

Guidelines for reducing stigma and discrimination and enhanacing care and support for people living with HIV and AIDS

KHAN, Naira
LOEWENSON, Rene
2005

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In many communities, stigma and fear of discrimination often exacerbate the impact of the AIDS epidemic and prevent people living with HIV (PLWH) from accessing support services. This document, commissioned by SANASO, and incorporating inputs from faith-based organisations, union representatives, people living with HIV and the media, examines how to address stigma and discrimination in key settings of social life, such as the family, the workplace, faith-based organisations, and the media. It suggests good practices, policies or behavioural changes which should foster a supportive environment for PLWH and improve the general response to HIV and AIDS

Adherence

NATIONAL AIDS MANUAL (NAM)
2005

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Adherence is the most important factor in the success of your anti-HIV treatments. This booklet explains why adherence is important and provides some hints on actions you could take to improve your adherence

Psychosocial support and counselling for young children affected by HIV and AIDS

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2005

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This is a key list of essential information resources on psychosocial support and counselling for children affected by HIV and AIDS. Recognising psychosocial needs in young children affected by HIV and AIDS is relatively new. It refers to the psychological and emotional well-being of the child and the caregiver, including issues of self esteem, insights into adaptation to the new circumstances brought by the impact of HIV and AIDS, social functioning and social relationships. Psychosocial support is one way of increasing the capacities of young children and their caregivers to cope. Manuals and toolkits in this Key list seek to heighten critical awareness of the cultural and ethical issues associated with psychosocial work. They encourage people to think of locally used words and expressions and of how young children express themselves as social beings

Treatment, care and support for young children affected by HIV and AIDS

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2005

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This is a key list of essential information resources on treatment for children living with HIV and AIDS. Infants who are HIV positive have little or no access to anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) and around half die before the age of one. Most of the rest die before the age of five. ARV treatment programmes do not appear to be targeting this age group. Under conditions of poverty, ill-health and stress, parents and other caregivers struggle to meet nutritional, health and psychosocial needs of children at a critical and formative stage. Most very young children born to HIV positive parents spend their first few years with ill and tired caregivers. Where a child loses one or both parents to AIDS, they are usually absorbed into extended families in which primary caregivers are grandmothers whose situation is also often overlooked. This Key list includes a range of case studies, toolkits and analysis that can be used to help strengthen community responses and take action to help young children

Another anti-AIDS initiative takes off

KIGWANGALLAH, Nasser
October 2004

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Article showing how Tanzania has established and Early Childhood Development ECD and HIV/AIDS country support team aimed at finding existing data on young children affected by the epidemic. The team is lead by the Tanzania Commission for AIDS (TACAIDS), Zanzibar AIDS Commission and the Ministry for Community Development, Gender and Children Affairs

Children on the brink 2004 : a joint report of new orphan estimates and a framework for action

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
USAID
July 2004

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Millions of children are growing up without parents. Millions more are in households with family members sick or dying from AIDS; children in sub-Saharan Africa have been hardest hit. This report presents the latest statistics on historical, current and projected numbers of children under 18 who have been orphaned by AIDS and other causes. This edition of the biennial report underscores the changing needs of this vulnerable group as they progress through adolescence and calls for the urgent development and expansion of family and community support

HIV and infant feeding : a compilation of programmatic evidence

KONIZ-BOOHER, Peggy
et al
July 2004

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This paper tries to deepen understandings of the biological and programmatic implications of the transmission of HIV through breastfeeding which have previously been hampered by insufficient study and difficulties of interpretation. It is a careful look at the findings of programmatic approaches. The project attempted to find, summarise and analyse reports on a wide variety of relevant programmes conducted since 1998 UNICEF guidelines were issued. The programmes range from small community research projects to national programmes. The compilation addresses numerous controversial topics and constraints, including human resources, confused mothers, stigma and discrimination, spillover of replacement feeding, free or subsidised infant formula, family economics and the difficulty in providing integrated HIV testing, informed choice counselling, community support, logistics and follow-up care for mothers and infants

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