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Better understanding of youth mental health

The Lancet
April 2017

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Mental health issues are the leading cause of disability in adolescents aged 15–19 years in all the world's regions, contributing 45% of their overall burden of disease. Early intervention to prevent mental health disorders is crucial to suicide prevention and to improve lifelong wellbeing. In April 2017, Mission Australia, in association with the Black Dog Institute (a research institute based in New South Wales) published the 5th Youth Mental Health Report. A survey of 21 000 Australian adolescents recorded 22·8% of young Australians meeting the criteria for probable serious mental illness (PSMI), as assessed by the Kessler 6 measure of non-specific psychological distress. Adolescent girls were almost twice as likely than boys to meet the criteria for PSMI. A significantly higher proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander responders met the criteria for PSMI (31·6%)  than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31140-6

Vol. 389, No. 10080, p1670, 29 April 2017

 

‘First, do no harm’ : are disability assessments associated with adverse trends in mental health? A longitudinal ecological study

BARR, B
et al
November 2015

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“In England between 2010 and 2013, just over one million recipients of the main out-of-work disability benefit had their eligibility reassessed using a new functional checklist—the Work Capability Assessment. Doctors and disability rights organisations have raised concerns that this has had an adverse effect on the mental health of claimants, but there are no population level studies exploring the health effects of this or similar policies… Here the researchers used multivariable regression to investigate whether variation in the trend in reassessments in each of 149 local authorities in England was associated with differences in local trends in suicides, self-reported mental health problems and antidepressant prescribing rates, while adjusting for baseline conditions and trends in other factors known to influence mental ill-health”

 

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, doi:10.1136/jech-2015-206209

mhGAP mental health gap action programme : scaling up care for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2008

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This report presents an action plan to scale up services for mental, neurological and substance use disorders for countries, especially low and lower middle income countries. It describes the mhGAP programme, outlines framework for country action and emphasises the building of partnerships. This resource is useful for people interested in scaling up services for mental health in developing countries

Where there is no psychiatrist : a mental health care manual

PATEL, Vikram
2003

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This is a practical manual about mental health care, aimed at community health workers, primary care nurses, social workers and primary care doctors. It describes more than 30 clinical problems associated with mental illness, using a problem-solving approach to guide the reader through their assessment and management. It addresses the lack of understanding of mental health among many health workers

World report on violence and health

KRUG, Etienne G
Eds
2002

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This report raises the awareness of the potential to address the root causes of violence in society. It provides an analysis of the the factors that lead to violence, and the possible responses of different sectors in society. A key requirement ot tackle violence in society is to base any prevention activities on research and best evidence. Any intervention needs to be collaborative, involving a wide range of professional expertise from medicine, psychology, criminology, education and economics

Preventing suicide : a resource for primary healthcare workers

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO). Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
2000

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This manual, aimed at primary health workers, describes the factors which lead to suicidal tendencies including mental disorders, physical illness, socio-demographic and environmental factors. The manual includes chapters on identifying and reaching out to the suicidal person, assessing the risk of suicide and managing the suicidal person

Primary prevention of mental, neurological and psychosocial disorders

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
1998

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This book describes a number of simple and effective measures for the primary prevention of selected mental, neurological, and psychosocial disorders. Addressed to policy-makers as well as mental health professionals, the book aims both to increase awareness of the potential of primary prevention and to encourage the use of specific interventions. Four disorders are covered: mental retardation, epilepsy, suicide, and burnout of health care staff. Each disorder is discussed according to a common format that includes information on the size of the problem, risk factors and causes, and measures available for primary prevention. The book adopts a public health approach, arguing that the multifactorial causes of most mental and neurological disorders requires broad-based strategies involving many different sectors. Recommended lines of action range from simple procedures to measures at the legislative level. [Publisher's abstract, amended]

International association for suicide prevention

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION (IASP)

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The International Association for Suicide Prevention is dedicated to preventing suicidal behaviors, alleviating its effects and providing a forum for academics, mental health professionals, crisis workers, volunteers and suicide survivors. This website provides information about the organisation and links to it’s activities, newsletters, publications and related resources. A login feature is available for the association members

WHO Mental Health Gap Action Programme

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

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The WHO Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) aims at scaling up services for mental, neurological and substance use disorders for countries especially with low- and middle-income. The programme asserts that with proper care, psychosocial assistance and medication, tens of millions could be treated for depression, schizophrenia, and epilepsy, prevented from suicide and begin to lead normal lives– even where resources are scarce.

Resources available include:

mhGAP Operations Manual (2018)
mhGAP Training Manuals (2017)
mhGAP Intervention Guide 2.0 app (2017)
mhGAP Intervention Guide - Version 2.0 (2016)

Reports of the yearly mhGAP Forum are available

 

WHO : mental health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)

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This video provides an overview of the global mental health situation with detailed information and statistics. It highlights the mental health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) which is an WHO initiative that advocates for proper care, psychosocial assistance, and medication in limited resource settings for the treatment of depression, schizophrenia, and epilepsy and for the prevention of suicide

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