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Influence of cultural factors on disability and rehabilitation in developing countries [Editorial]

ASIA PACIFIC DISABILITY REHABILITATION JOURNAL
1999

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Western stereotypes of 'community' are used in the planning of many CBR programmes in developing countries. These programmes expose themselves to a higher risk of failure because they tend to conflict with the cultural factors of the host country. This editorial illustrates the significance of cultural influences on disability and rehabilitation in the context of CBR

Social capital and civil society

FUKUYAMA, Francis
1999

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A paper documenting the core concepts of social capital and its economic and political functions. It traces the origins of social capital and suggests how it can be cultivated. It explores core concepts, but uses academic and sometimes complex words to describe them

Social capital and poverty

COLLIER, Paul
November 1998

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This paper attempts to "map" the idea of social capital, which relates different types of evidence and theories originating from different disciplines. After an introduction, it attempts to define social capital from basic economic theory, answering the questions 'what is social about it?' and 'what makes it capital?'. Section 3 extends the theoretical analysis by answering the question 'how does it work?'. It thus disaggregates social capital according to the types of social interaction which form it, the way they form it, and how it raises incomes. Section 4 discusses "endoginising" social capital, and Section 5 distinguishes social capital generated by civil society and that supplied by government. It then turns to the measurement and empirical application of the analytic concepts, at the micro-level of household and firm studies (Section 6), and at the aggregate level of regressions on internationally comparable data (Section 7). The final three sections turn to policy. Section 8 discusses examples of when social capital can be damaging. Section 9 considers how policy should respond to the more usual case of when civil social capital is useful but under-provided. Section 10 focuses on the implications for poverty

Using a home care agency : a question and answer guide for disabled people

BRACKING, Stuart
COWAN, Ross
1998

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These guidelines, produced by the Gateshead Personal Assistance Pilot Project, provide considerations for disabled people when looking for home care services. Different aspects are mentioned such as how to find an agency, administrative work and staff management.
Although this guide has been written for the situation in the UK, it also gives a more general overview of home care for disabled people

Disability statistics in the People's Republic of China

QIU, Zhupying
1998

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This paper presents the figures of disabled people in China. To a certain extent it is difficult to collect accurate figures of the total number of people with disabilities. The article presents how disability is classified in China in order to create a clear picture of the situation there. After analysing some surveys collected and conducted previously, a general picture of the total number of people with disabilities will be drawn

Social capital : the missing link?

GROOTAERT, Christiaan
1998

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This paper describes social capital as the missing link in the understanding of growth and development, which has traditionally been analysed in terms of physical, natural and human capital. It also discusses the definition, monitoring and measurement of social capital, and ends with a list of suggestions for donors seeking to incorporate these ideas in their work

Monitoring equity in health : a policy-oriented approach in low-and middle-income countries

BRAVEMAN, Paula
1998

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"This document gives an overview of a practical approach to monitoring social disparities in health within countries for the purpose of guiding policies. The material is intended to raise issues for further exploration among researchers, policy analysts, policy-makers, and other advocates for the public's well-being, concerning their best options for obtaining information on a routine and ongoing basis to guide action to reduce avoidable social disparities in health in their countries."

Questioning the solution : politics of primary health care and child health with an in-depth critique of oral rehydration solution

WERNER, David
et al
1997

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Analyzes and challenges conventional primary health care and child survival strategies. Too often, health and development planners try to use technological fixes rather than confront the social and economic inequities that perpetuate poverty, poor health, and high child mortality. As a case study, the authors show how marketing Oral Rehydration Therapy as a commercial product, rather than encouraging self-reliance, has turned this potentially life-saving technology into yet another way of exploiting and further impoverishing the poor. The book explores the history of medicine and public health since colonial times, and shows that health is determined more by the equity or inequity of social structures than by conventional health services. It reveals how structural adjustment policies and the globalisation of the economy diminish the health and quality of life of vulnerable people, especially women and children. Examples from many countries (including Mexico, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Nicaragua) illustrate instructive approaches to health and development that put human needs before top-heavy economic growth. The four major parts of the book are: the rise and fall of primary health care; Oral Rehydration Therapy: a solution to death from diarrhea?; what really determines the health of a population; and solutions that empower the poor: examples of equity-oriented initiatives

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