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Gender equality and women’s empowerment : women and girls with disabilities

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
2014

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This policy brief highlights the intersectionality between gender and disability and advocates that the unique situation of women and girls with disabilities be considered in the provision of protection for women and girls. It outlines the following five key issues for women and girls with disabilities: participation in political and public life, control over their own bodies and family planning, access to justice, education/employment and protection from gender based violence

These issues resonate with the current narrative for crosscutting goals on gender equality and the need for the post-2015 framework to be underpinned by human rights. The recommendations are both overarching (relating to gender equality and human rights) and are also specific to women and girls with disabilities

Post-2015 sustainable development goals : policy brief

Governance, rule of law and peace and security

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
2014

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This policy brief, prepared for the Open Working Group session on sustainable development, sets out key recommendations and key issues for inclusive governance, rule of law and peace and security for empowering persons with disabilities.  When implementing development initiatives, it advocates that countries ensure inclusive governance and growth i.e. greater inclusion of persons with disabilities in political, social and economic needs, and the systematic inclusion of disability across all aspects of peace building and conflict management

Post-2015 sustainable development goals Policy Brief

Disability prevalence among adults : estimates for 54 countries and progress towards a global estimate

MITRA, Sophie
SAMBAMOORTHI, Usha
July 2013

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This study estimated disability prevalence among adults at global, regional and country levels using internationally comparable disability data and measure. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of data from the World Health Survey (WHS) (2002-2004) for nationally representative samples of civilian, non-institutionalized populations in 54 countries. A disability was measured as having at least one severe or extreme difficulty with bodily functions (seeing, concentrating) and activities (moving around, self-care) based on an individual’s self-reports
In the 54 countries under study, severe or extreme functional or activity difficulties are highly prevalent. For all countries, disability prevalence is estimated at 14% for all adults. Low and middle income countries have higher disability prevalence compared to high income countries. Among subgroups, disability prevalence stands at 12% among working age adults and 39% among the elderly. Women have higher prevalence than men.
Disability is found to be highly prevalent among adults, with an estimated global prevalence at 14%. Disability deserves enhanced policy attention and resources in public health and international development
Discussion Paper No: 2013-06, Forthcoming in Disability and Rehabilitation

Inclusive employment

LEYMAT, Anne
February 2012

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This policy brief gives an overview of Handicap International's activities on inclusive employment highlighting key statistics, definitions, approaches, methodology and seven modalities of intervention
PP brief No 5

Poverty and disability : a critical review of the literature in low and middle-income countries

GROCE, Nora
et al
September 2011

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"This paper critically reviews and synthesises the currently available evidence base regarding the relationship between disability, poverty and health. While it is widely asserted that disability and poverty are closely linked, this is the first review that explicitly asks: ‘What is the current evidence base for the link between disability, poverty and health in low-and middle-income countries?...This paper presents findings from our critical review, and a discussion of those themes that emerge from the small evidence based sample we found. However, our most significant finding is the current lack of strong evidence on the links between disability poverty and health - evidence which is needed to build effective international development policy and global health programming"
Working paper 16

Assessing the situation of women with disabilities in Australia : a human rights approach

Rosny Park, Tasmania
Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA)
July 2011

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This paper uses a human rights framework to document the range of data, research and information needed in order to give a comprehensive assessment of the situation of women with disabilities in Australia. The paper provides "an overview of the intersection of gender and disability, as well as a brief background to the human rights imperative. Using key articles from the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the paper then prescribes the key quantitative and qualitative data and research required under each article, and links this to Australia’s international human rights obligations and domestic policy context"

Disability and poverty in developing countries : a snapshot from the World Health Survey

MITRA, Sophie
POSARAC, Aleksandra
VICK, Brandon
April 2011

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This paper outlines the economic and poverty situation of working-age persons with disabilities and their households in 15 developing countries. Using data from the World Health Survey, the study presents estimates of disability prevalence, individual-level economic well-being, household-level economic well-being, and multidimensional poverty measure. Detailed appendices are provided to support the results of the study. This paper is useful for people interested in the social and economic conditions of people with disabilities in developing countries
Social Protection Discussion Paper No 1109

Women with disabilities and the human right to health : a policy paper

FROHMADER, Carolyn
May 2010

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This policy paper examines women with disabilities' right to health in Australia. Given the context of three key human rights conventions, the paper highlights the ways in which women and girls with disabilities in Australia are denied their right to health and provides an overview of policy initiatives required to address the structural, socioeconomic and cultural barriers. The paper concludes with strategy suggestions for the Australian Government. This document would be useful for people interested in women with disabilities' right to health in Australia

Social enterprise as market regulation : non-governmental interventions in essential medicines wholesaling to low income countries

MACKINTOSH, Maureen
2008

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"This paper explores the under-studied role of social enterprise as traders and regulatory actors in the international wholesale markets for essential medicines and their impact on accessibility, quality and prices in these perverse markets, drawing on an interview survey of European-based socially oriented wholesalers supplying the medicines market for sub-Saharan Africa. The paper argues that these enterprises play an important role in regulating price and quality and hence in improving access to medicines by the poor. However they face challenging market and political conditions. The paper analyses the motivations and organisational structures that sustain social and ethical commitment in this market, drawing on theories of social enterprise and non-profit business, and surveys the challenges and constraints. It then examines the formal international and national regulatory interventions in the international markets and their effects on social enterprise, in the context of a substantial institutional divide between the medicines-related campaigning of the large international NGOs and the activities of these market-oriented social enterprises"

Social cash transfers and children affected by HIV and AIDS : background paper

GREEN, Maia
2007

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This paper considers core issues around social cash transfers in relation to children and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. It provides an overview of evidence regarding the potential impacts of social cash transfers for vulnerable children, including those affected by HIV & AIDS. It examines the implications of programme design for reaching vulnerable children and considers the capacity constraints affecting scale up in the region

Socio-economic impact of disability in Latin America : Chile and Uruguay

CONTRERAS, Dante
et al
July 2006

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By using information from two national household surveys for Chile and Uruguay in 2003, this paper analyses the effect of economic and social policies to increase opportunities and social welfare for people with disabilities in the two countries. This paper would be of interest to those studying the socio-economic impact of disability

Mine action strategy

AUSAID
May 2006

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The aim of this document is to promote a safer and more secure environment for development and poverty reduction by alleviating the threat and socio-economic impact caused by landmines and other explosive remnants of war. The primary objectives of this strategy is to reduce suffering of survivors and support socio-economic rehabilitation; reduce the threat of explosive remnants of war to civilian populations; and improving the efficiency and effectiveness of advocacy

Cash benefits to disabled persons in Brazil : an analysis of the BPC continuous cash benefit programme

MEDEIROS, Marcelo
DINIZ, Debora
SQUINCA, Flávia
2006

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This resource is an analysis of the Continuous Cash Benefit Programme, an unconditional cash transfer to disabled Brazilians and other vulnerable groups. The data used for this paper are based on court decisions and laws relating to this policy since implementation. The aim is to provide recommendations on the design, operation and future evaluations of the programme. This resource would be useful for anyone with an interest in social protection, disability and development

Trends in the timing of first marriage among men and women in the developing world

MENSCH, Barbara S
SINGH, Susheela
CASTERLINE, John B
August 2005

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The timing of first union merits investigation not only because of the close temporal link between marriage and the onset of childbearing, but also because the age when men and women marry has implications for the organization of family life and for gender relations within society. This paper begins by reviewing the contributions of various social science disciplines to an understanding of the timing of marriage. Using current status data from 73 countries provided by the United Nations Population Division and retrospective data from 52 Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 1990 and 2001, we then examine recent trends in the timing of first marriage or union for men and women in the developing world. With the exception of South America for both sexes and South and Southeast Asia for men, substantial declines have occurred in the proportion of young men and women who are married. Given the differentials in the timing of marriage by educational attainment and residence, we assess whether the decline in the proportion of young people who are married is related to increases in schooling and urbanization. Expansion of schooling for women has had some impact, but a considerable portion of the reduction in early marriage is not explained by changes in levels of education. We consider other factors that might account for the increase in age at marriage. Finally, we review what is known about the consequences of changing age at marriage with a particular focus on risk of HIV infection.

Are disabled peoples’ voices from both south and north being heard in the development process?|A comparative analysis between the situation in South Africa, Zimbabwe, United Kingdom and Northern Europe

DUBE, A K
CHAROWA, Gladys
May 2005

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This study reveals that there are major differences between the South and the North regarding issues involving persons with disabilities. It shows that the North provides devices for disabled persons and maintains high standards in disability; whereas countries in the South have weak acts of parliament, in addition to the fact that much of the South does not have social security benefits

Measuring welfare for small but vulnerable groups : poverty and disability in Uganda

HOOGEVEEN, Johannes G
2004

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When vulnerable groups such as disabled people are surveyed, representative welfare estimates from non-purposive sample surveys becomes an issue. This paper takes the example of Uganda and describes the connections between disability, poverty, wellbeing and social welfare. This is possibly the first time that statistically representative information on income poverty amongst disabled people has been generated for a developing country

Small arms in the pacific

ALPERS, Philip
TWYFORD, Conor
March 2003

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This study investigates a range of small arms-related issues in 20 nations of the southern Pacific. It also examines the status of existing firearm legislation and the degree of legal stockpiles and illicit trade, and the socio-economic impacts of armed conflict on Pacific communities. This resource would be useful for anyone with an interest in conflict situations, socio-economic impacts and development

Chronic poverty and disability in Uganda

LWANGA-NTALE, Charles
2003

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The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of long-duration poverty and disability. It seeks to summarise the current state of knowledge about disability and chronic poverty in Uganda; discuss factors that lead to disabled people living in perpetual poverty; describe efforts to address the long-term poverty of disabled people in Uganda; and propose policy interventions aimed at the inclusion of disabled people in Uganda's development process

Disability pensions and social security reform : analysis of the Latin American experience

GRUSHKA, Carlos O
DEMARCO, Gustavo
2003

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This paper describes the disability pension arrangements prevailing in ten Latin American countries that reformed their pension systems. The analysis is limited to the topic of disability pensions, without attempting to evaluate other aspects such as accessibility.
Comparisons reveal that a wide variety of options for disability systems are possible. In the following sections general issues in the design of the disability-pension systems are identified

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