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Prevalence, types, and combinations of multiple problems among recipients of work disability benefits

BRONGERS, Kor A
HOEKSTRA, Tialda
ROELOFS, Pepijn D D M
BROUWER, Sandra
2021

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Purpose: For persons on disability benefits who are facing multiple problems, active labour market poli- cies seem less successful. Besides health problems, these people perceive personal, social, and environ- mental problems. Since very little is known about these “non-medical” problems our aim was to explore the prevalence of clients experiencing multiple problems, the types and number of perceived problems, combinations of perceived problems, and associated characteristics in a group of work disability benefit recipients.

 

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study, using self-reported data on perceived problems and socio-demographics, and register data from the Dutch Social Security Institute on diagnosed diseases and employment status. A convenient group of labour experts recruited eligible clients on work disability benefit.

 

Results: Of the 207 persons on work disability benefit, 87% perceived having multiple problems. Most reported problems were related to physical (76%) or mental (76%) health. Health problems most fre- quently occurred together with a mismatch in education, financial problems, or care for family members. Clients with lower education experienced significantly more problems than clients with an intermediate or high educational level.

 

Conclusions: Clients with multiple problems face severe and intertwined problems in different domains of life, and need tailored multi-actor work disability management.

The inclusion of persons with disabilities in EU-funded humanitarian aid operations.DG ECHO Operational Guidance

EUROPEAN COMMISSION
January 2019

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This guidance has been developed as a tool to reach the goal that all EU-funded humanitarian partners be required to take the needs of persons with disabilities into account in their projects.


It concentrates on mainstreaming the needs of persons with disabilities across all types of humanitarian interventions, hence not dealing with targeted actions specifically. As such, this guidance is a complementary tool to existing Thematic Policies, in particular to Thematic Policy n°8 on Humanitarian Protection

 

The guidance consists of three main parts. Part II presents disability mainstreaming in programming in detail and provides a series of concrete examples and illustrations. It also provides tools to collect data and measure disability inclusion. Part III of the guidance is a short document that that can be easily used in the field for either programming or monitoring.

Benefits stigma in Britain

BAUMBERG, Ben
et al
November 2012

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This report presents the results of a research study assessing the impact of stigma and other social influences on applying for benefits in the UK

A national survey of public attitudes towards disability

NATIONAL DISABILITY AUTHORITY
October 2011

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This report presents the results from surveys carried out in 2001, 2006 and 2011 on public attitudes towards disability in Ireland. Public attitudes to people with disabilities can be a key facilitator or a serious barrier to their inclusion and participation in society, highlighting the importance of promoting and enabling active participation of people with disabilities in the mainstream community and access to mainstream services. The 2011 survey results indicate the importance of ensuring that Irish society and all its stakeholders recognise the need to address the negative attitudes that exist to achieve inclusion of people with disabilities
Disability Research Series 14

Disabled people in refugee and asylum seeking communities

ROBERTS, Keri
HARRIS, Jennifer
2002

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This study was done to assess the situation of disabled refugees and asylum seekers in the UK, in terms of numbers, country of origin, and their situation regarding access to social and welfare services and housing. Recommendations are made for social care and refugee practitioners in the UK

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