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Prevalence, types, and combinations of multiple problems among recipients of work disability benefits

BRONGERS, Kor A
HOEKSTRA, Tialda
ROELOFS, Pepijn D D M
BROUWER, Sandra
2021

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Purpose: For persons on disability benefits who are facing multiple problems, active labour market poli- cies seem less successful. Besides health problems, these people perceive personal, social, and environ- mental problems. Since very little is known about these “non-medical” problems our aim was to explore the prevalence of clients experiencing multiple problems, the types and number of perceived problems, combinations of perceived problems, and associated characteristics in a group of work disability benefit recipients.

 

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study, using self-reported data on perceived problems and socio-demographics, and register data from the Dutch Social Security Institute on diagnosed diseases and employment status. A convenient group of labour experts recruited eligible clients on work disability benefit.

 

Results: Of the 207 persons on work disability benefit, 87% perceived having multiple problems. Most reported problems were related to physical (76%) or mental (76%) health. Health problems most fre- quently occurred together with a mismatch in education, financial problems, or care for family members. Clients with lower education experienced significantly more problems than clients with an intermediate or high educational level.

 

Conclusions: Clients with multiple problems face severe and intertwined problems in different domains of life, and need tailored multi-actor work disability management.

The impact of COVID-19 on disabled people in Northern Ireland

FITZSIMONS, Sean
O'NEILL, Emma
CRAWFORD, Alison
September 2020

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Key findings and recommendations are reported from an online survey published in April 2020 to gather the experiences of disabled people, their families and carers during the COVID-19 outbreak in Northern Ireland. The survey went live on April 1st 2020 and closed on April 30th 2020.  Over 400 survey responses were received, including over 1300 written statements. 

Key findings are reported in the areas of: social care; physical health; mental health and emotional wellbeing; carers; accessing food and medicine; accessing information; employment and training; social security benefits and community support

Social insurance literacy: a scoping review on how to define and measure it

STAHL, Christian
KARLSSON, Elin A
SANDQVIST, Jan
HENSING, Gunnel
BROUWER, Sandra
FRIBERG, Emilie
MACEACHEN, Ellen
October 2019

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Purpose: Sickness insurance and workers’ compensation systems decide on peoples’ eligibility for benefits, and are commonly based on medical certificates and assessments of work ability. Systems differ in the extent to which they preserve clients’ dignity and right to fair assessments. In this article, we define a new concept for studying interactions between individuals and systems: social insurance literacy, which concerns how well people understand the different procedures and regulations in social insurance systems, and how well systems communicate with clients in order to help them understand the system.

 

Methods: The concept was defined through a scoping literature review of related concepts, a conceptual re-analysis in relation to the social insurance field, and a following workshop.

 

Results: Five related concepts were reviewed for definitions and operationalizations: health literacy, financial/economic literacy, legal capability/ability, social security literacy, and insurance literacy.

 

Conclusions: Social insurance literacy is defined as the extent to which individuals can obtain, understand and act on information in a social insurance system, related to the comprehensibility of the information provided by the system. This definition is rooted in theories from sociology, social medicine and public health. In the next step, a measure for the concept will be developed based on this review.

The concept of welfare technology in Swedish municipal eldercare

FRENNERT, Susanne
BAUDIN, Katarina
September 2019

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Purpose: An ageing population presents a challenge for municipal eldercare in Sweden due to difficulties recruiting staff and there being a strained economy. A strategy involving welfare technology is presented as one such solution. An important group to carry out this strategy involves those who work with welfare technology in municipal eldercare. In this paper we describe their perception of welfare technology, and the challenges and opportunities they perceive in utilizing it.

 

Methods: A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed to all Swedish municipalities and answered by 393 respondents. Analyses show that the respondents were representative of the different professions who work with welfare technology within municipal eldercare.

 

Results: Welfare technology was perceived as being more reliable and safer than humans with regards to supervisions and reminders. The respondents acknowledged factors that slowed down the implementation of welfare technology in municipal eldercare organizations, such as resistance to change, lack of finances, lack of supporting evidence, lack of infrastructure, high staff turnover, difficulties with procurement and uncertainties about responsibility and laws.

 

Conclusions: We found that the people who work with and make decisions about welfare technology in municipal eldercare organizations were generally very positive about the deployment and use of such technology, but there appear to be problems within municipal eldercare organizations to realize this vision. The lack of structured implementation processes and coherent evaluation models indicates inequality of the access to welfare technology and, as a result, even though Swedish eldercare is publicly funded, the availability of welfare technologies and their usage differ between municipalities.

Feasibility of Family Group Conference to promote return-to-work of persons receiving work disability benefit

BRONGERS, Kor A
CORNELIUS, Bert
ROELOFS, Pepijn D D M
VAN DER KLINK, Jac J L
BROUWER, Sandra
April 2019

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Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of Family Group Conference for promoting return to work by clients receiving work disability benefits from the Social Security Institute in the Netherlands.

 

Methods: We conducted a mixed-method pre- post-intervention feasibility study, using questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and return to work plans drafted in Family Group Conferences. A convenient sample of Labour experts, Clients, and Facilitators was followed for a period of six months. Feasibility outcomes were demand, acceptability, implementation and limited efficacy of perceived mental health and level of participation.

 

Results: Fourteen labour experts and sixteen facilitators enrolled in the study. Of 28 eligible clients, nine (32%) participated in a Family Group Conference. About 78% of the Family Group Conferences were implemented as planned. Participant satisfaction about Family Group Conference was good (mean score 7). Perceived mental health and level of participation improved slightly during follow-up. Most actions in the return to work plans were work related. Most frequently chosen to take action was the participating client himself, supported by significant others in his or her social network. Six months after the Family Group Conference five participating clients returned to paid or voluntary work.

 

Conclusions: Family Group Conference seems a feasible intervention to promote return to work by clients on work disability benefit. Involvement of the social network may have added value to support the clients in this process. An effectiveness study to further develop and test Family Group Conferences is recommended.

The ‘compliant’, the ‘pacified’ and the ‘rebel’: experiences with Swiss disability insurance

PIECEK, Monika
TABIN, Jean-Pierre
PERRIN, Céline
PROBST, Isabelle
2019

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Switzerland’s social policies in the field of disability have been significantly reshaped over the last two decades by reducing the number of allowances awarded and by increasing the recourse to vocational rehabilitation measures. What stances do individuals who experience the implementation of these policies adopt? What kind of tests are they subjected to? How can we explain the posture they adopt – be it ‘compliant’, ‘pacified’ or ‘rebellious’ – when facing the (re)assignations of their identity and professional status? Drawing on interviews conducted with individuals who have recently been involved in programmes set up by Swiss disability insurance, we highlight their uncertainties and concerns relating to their place in society, as well as their reactions to disability insurance’s interventions.

The inclusion of persons with disabilities in EU-funded humanitarian aid operations.DG ECHO Operational Guidance

EUROPEAN COMMISSION
January 2019

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This guidance has been developed as a tool to reach the goal that all EU-funded humanitarian partners be required to take the needs of persons with disabilities into account in their projects.


It concentrates on mainstreaming the needs of persons with disabilities across all types of humanitarian interventions, hence not dealing with targeted actions specifically. As such, this guidance is a complementary tool to existing Thematic Policies, in particular to Thematic Policy n°8 on Humanitarian Protection

 

The guidance consists of three main parts. Part II presents disability mainstreaming in programming in detail and provides a series of concrete examples and illustrations. It also provides tools to collect data and measure disability inclusion. Part III of the guidance is a short document that that can be easily used in the field for either programming or monitoring.

Rethinking the work capability assessment

BAUMBERG, Ben
et al
March 2015

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This report outlines the key research findings about the Work Capability Assessment (WCA) criteria of the Employment Support Allowance (ESA), a means tested benefit for those who are unable to find work in Britain. It presents the state of the UK’s existing assessment and then describes how seven key countries systematically assess incapacity, and the lessons these countries provide for reforming the WCA in the UK

Nonparametric estimation of a compensating variation : the cost of disability

HANCOCK, Ruth
MORCIANO, Marcello
PUDNEY, Stephen
December 2013

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This paper proposes a nonparametric matching approach to estimation of implicit costs based on the compensating variation (CV) principle. The paper aims to introduce the matching approach, compare its properties with those of the conventional indirect parametric approach, and demonstrate its application in an important policy area. The authors apply the method to estimate the additional personal costs experienced by disabled older people in Great Britain, finding that those costs are substantial, averaging in the range £48-61 a week, compared with the mean level of state disability benefit (£28) or total public support (£47) received. Estimated costs rise strongly with the severity of disability. The authors compare the nonparametric approach with the standard parametric method, finding that the latter tends to generate large overestimates unless conditions are ideal, and recommend the nonparametric approach

ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2013-26

Benefits stigma in Britain

BAUMBERG, Ben
et al
November 2012

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This report presents the results of a research study assessing the impact of stigma and other social influences on applying for benefits in the UK

Assessing the impact of European governments’ austerity plans on the rights of people with disabilities : European report

HAUBEN, Harald
et al
October 2012

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This report "set out to examine the evidence at both European and national level of the effect of the economic crisis, and its consequences in terms of austerity measures, on the rights and status of people with disabilities. In particular, it focused on the impact on the delivery of social services and income supports and allowances particularly aimed at people with disabilities"

Forgotten Europeans forgotten rights : the human rights of persons placed in institutions

PARKER, Camilla
et al
2012

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This report is the first of a series of OHCHR publications intended to inform and encourage debate on the issues affecting children, persons with disabilities and older persons in institutions. The study highlights that many children and people with disabilities and older persons continue to be placed in long-stay residential institutional care in countries across Europe, often for life. The report draws attention to this situation and addresses the responsibility of governments to develop community-based alternatives to institutional care. It identifies the issues covered by the relevant existing standards and highlights areas that require further consideration and discussion

A national survey of public attitudes towards disability

NATIONAL DISABILITY AUTHORITY
October 2011

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This report presents the results from surveys carried out in 2001, 2006 and 2011 on public attitudes towards disability in Ireland. Public attitudes to people with disabilities can be a key facilitator or a serious barrier to their inclusion and participation in society, highlighting the importance of promoting and enabling active participation of people with disabilities in the mainstream community and access to mainstream services. The 2011 survey results indicate the importance of ensuring that Irish society and all its stakeholders recognise the need to address the negative attitudes that exist to achieve inclusion of people with disabilities
Disability Research Series 14

Independence, choice and control : DLA and personal mobility in state-funded residential care|Volume 1 : report

THE LOW REVIEW
2011

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This report focuses upon: how the mobility component of DLA is being used by care home residents and the impact of the loss of this benefit; funding arrangements for meeting personal mobility needs between local authorities and care home providers; and responsibilities of care home providers in relation to the mobility needs of residents. Over 800 submissions from individuals, local authorities and providers were provided , and six oral evidence sessions were held for the compilation of this report
The executive summary and report are available in both word and pdf formats
Oral and written evidence is contained in volume 2 available on the website

Disabled children : a legal handbook

BROACH, Steve
CLEMENTS, Luke
READ, Janet
2010

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This handbook aims to empower disabled children and their families through a greater understanding of their rights and entitlements in England and Wales. It is useful reading for the families of disabled children, their advocates and lawyers, voluntary and statutory sector advisers, commissioners, managers and lawyers working for public authorities, education, social and health care professionals, students and academics

Study on social and health services of general interest in the European Union : final synthesis report

HUBER, Manfred
MAUCHER, Mathias
SAK, Barbara
June 2008

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This report seeks to improve the knowledge of both operators and the European Commission about the situation of social and health services of general interest in the European Union (EU). It is also designed to examine the impact of the EU rules on the development of social and health services. The purpose is to eventually establish a monitoring and dialogue tool in the form of biennial reports

NI 54 : services for disabled children

SOLUTIONS4INCLUSION
May 2007

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This factsheet describes how an indicator for services for disabled children will be developed in the UK. The indicator will be based on an achieved sample of a minimum of 200 parents of disabled children in each local area using surveys. The survey will be used to calculate a national baseline indicator and produce a report. Details are provided for the associated toolkit, reports and related project links

Qualitative survey on disability and living standards in Georgia

INSTITUTE FOR POLICY STUDIES (IPS)
PA CONSULTING GROUP
2007

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This report presents the disability situation in Georgia as of September 2006. The qualitative research identifies the most significant issues, challenges and barriers faced by members of the disabled population in order to contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between disability and poverty in a given country and globally, and provides recommendations aimed at designing/improving policies regarding employment, education, health care, and social protection

A review of income transfers to disabled and long term sick people in seven case study countries and implications for South Africa

WHITWORTH, Adam
WRIGHT, Gemma
NOBLE, Michael
April 2006

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This resource examines seven international case studies of state income maintenance policies for individuals who are disabled or long-term sick in order to analyze the current debates in South Africa surrounding the Disability Grant. The countries are: India, Mexico, USA, UK, Sweden, Netherlands, and Canada. The purpose is to provide an overview of the various benefits and the nature of social security coverage for disabled people and chronically sick individuals in each country. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in social protection, public policy and disability

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