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How do we ensure that social protection assistance initiatives work for people with disabilities?

HUNT, Xanthe
August 2019

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Question & problem

Social protection systems and other financial assistance, including cash transfers and integrated benefits packages, may be important ways to facilitate the inclusion of people with disabilities in services and society. There is limited information, however, with regards to their impact in low- and middle-income settings. To understand how these programs work, it is important to recognise that there are disability-targeted entitlements, but people with disabilities may also be eligible for mainstream programmes aimed at other targeted groups, such as people of a certain socio-economic status. This evidence note summarises what is known about challenges faced by both of these types of initiatives, as well as evidence-based recommendations to strengthen them.

Improving lives. The work, health and disability Green Paper

October 2016

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Employment rates amongst disabled people reveal one of the most significant inequalities in the UK today: less than half (48%) of disabled people are in employment compared to 80% of the non-disabled population. Despite a record-breaking labour market, 4.6 million disabled people and people with long-term health conditions are out of work leaving individuals, and some large parts of communities, disconnected from the benefits that work brings. People who are unemployed have higher rates of mortality and a lower quality of life. This green paper sets out the nature of the problem and why change is needed by employers, the welfare system, health and care providers, and all of us. Proposed solutions are set out  and views requested. (Consultation now closed)

04101608 10/16 

The disabled beggar : a literature review

GROCE, Nora
LOEB, Marie
MURRAY, Barbara
September 2014

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Beggars with disabilities are among the poorest and most disadvantaged in society. Yet they are virtually invisible in the policy agenda of countries around the world, and are often overlooked in programme and advocacy efforts to improve opportunities for people with disabilities in general. This literature review originated as part of an exploratory study of beggars with disabilities in Ethiopia, published by the Leonard Cheshire Disability and Inclusive Development Centre in collaboration with the ILO in 2013 based on fieldwork undertaken by Professor Groce in Addis Abba. It has been updated and published separately as a contribution to debates on the social and economic inclusion of people with disabilities, on poverty reduction and social protection

Gender, Equality and Diversity Branch, Working Paper No. 1

Nonparametric estimation of a compensating variation : the cost of disability

HANCOCK, Ruth
MORCIANO, Marcello
PUDNEY, Stephen
December 2013

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This paper proposes a nonparametric matching approach to estimation of implicit costs based on the compensating variation (CV) principle. The paper aims to introduce the matching approach, compare its properties with those of the conventional indirect parametric approach, and demonstrate its application in an important policy area. The authors apply the method to estimate the additional personal costs experienced by disabled older people in Great Britain, finding that those costs are substantial, averaging in the range £48-61 a week, compared with the mean level of state disability benefit (£28) or total public support (£47) received. Estimated costs rise strongly with the severity of disability. The authors compare the nonparametric approach with the standard parametric method, finding that the latter tends to generate large overestimates unless conditions are ideal, and recommend the nonparametric approach

ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2013-26

Effective poverty reduction and empowering women : a win-win situation?|CCTs in Latin America

HERZOG, Karolin
October 2011

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"Building on the conceptual issues surrounding the discussion of the feminisation of anti-poverty programmes and its translation into CCTs (Conditional cash transfer programmes), this paper therefore calls for more deliberately gender-sensitive programme designs to address women's capabilities for income generation and for the inclusion of men in order to transform gender relations and create more equality"
Discussion papers on social protection, Issue No 12

Social transfers : a critical strategy to meet the MDGs

BOURNE, Astrid Walker
MORGAN, Fiona
August 2010

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"This paper outlines the crucial role that social transfers can play by providing an inclusive framework to reduce intergenerational and chronic poverty and accelerate progress to achieve the MDGs"
HelpAge policy briefing

Securing our common future : why investing in reducing age based vulnerabilities is necessary in the global economic crisis : background issues paper

BEALES, Sylvia
September 2009

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"This paper argues that comprehensive age friendly social policy responses to both the financial crisis and to demographic transition are necessary and affordable, and that a focus on investment in the health, livelihoods and economic security of the older poor for the benefit of future generations is more urgent than ever"

A review of income transfers to disabled and long term sick people in seven case study countries and implications for South Africa

WHITWORTH, Adam
WRIGHT, Gemma
NOBLE, Michael
April 2006

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This resource examines seven international case studies of state income maintenance policies for individuals who are disabled or long-term sick in order to analyze the current debates in South Africa surrounding the Disability Grant. The countries are: India, Mexico, USA, UK, Sweden, Netherlands, and Canada. The purpose is to provide an overview of the various benefits and the nature of social security coverage for disabled people and chronically sick individuals in each country. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in social protection, public policy and disability

Making cash count : lessons from cash transfer schemes in east and southern Africa for supporting the most vulnerable children and households

DEVEREUX, Stephen
et al
2005

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This is the report of a study comparing unconditional cash transfers to vulnerable groups in 15 countries in east and southern Africa, with in-depth analysis of four counties - Ethiopia, Lesotho, Mozambique and Zambia. Because cash transfers are new to this region, the aim is to draw lessons for policy from a comparative review. The report finds that knowledge gaps impede the development of meaningful policy. This work would be useful for anyone with an interest in vulnerable groups, development and the socio-economic factors

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