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After 2015 : contexts, politics and processes for a post-2015 global agreement on development

MELAMED, Claire
January 2012

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"The Millennium Development Goals expire in 2015, just (four) years time. Discussions are already starting on what might replace them as a global agreement to promote development and poverty reduction. This paper sets out the context for those discussions, and some of the issues that will need to be addressed if a new agreement is to be both effective and politically acceptable"

Putting inequality in the post-2015 picture

MELAMED, Claire
2012

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"Inequality has been on the fringes of the development policy agenda for a long time, but until now there has been no clear policy agenda to tackle it. The process of developing and negotiating a post-2015 global framework for development offers a chance to think about what that policy agenda should be, how to incentivise governments and other actors to act on it, and how to measure progress. This paper considers some current proposals for integrating inequality into a post-2015 framework"

What should come after the millennium development goals? : voices from the South

POLLARD, Amy
et al
2010

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Focusing upon what should come after the millennium development goals, this paper "seeks to broaden the conversation, and ensure that the voices of those directly involved in fighting poverty in the South are heard. (The) research describes the perspectives of 104 representatives from civil society organisations, in 36 developing countries from across the world. Data was collected using a questionnaire, qualitative interviews and a workshop"

Successful projects : what makes them work? a cross-national analysis of the studies of projects that have improved the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities in India, Romania, Kenya and South Africa

GUSTAVSSON, Anders
et al
January 2007

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“This cross national analysis is based on national studies made by research teams in India, Kenya, Romania and South Africa. It aims to draw out the lessons learnt from successful social development processes in these countries. In each country, studies have been made of projects identified as interesting, successful and/or outstanding in the way they have improved the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities. This comparative report briefly describes the national studies, from which the respective teams made their own national conclusions and continues with across national analysis attempting to identify circumstances or factors that are common to these successful projects. Finally, the report summarises the conclusions and their implications”

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