Resources search

Disability and vocational rehabilitation in rural settings

HARLEY, Debra
et al
2018

Expand view

A graduate student textbook offered in 39 chapters, each with different authors and subjects. Abstracts, test questions and citations are freely available on-line. Full text is charged for. The book surveys rehabilitation and vocational programs aiding persons with disabilities in remote and developing areas in the U.S. and abroad. Contributors discuss longstanding challenges to these communities, most notably economic and environmental obstacles and ongoing barriers to service delivery, as well as their resilience and strengths. Considerations are largely of the US but there is a chapter on each of Asia and Pacific region, Australasia, Canada, Mexico, India, Turkey, Colombia and the UK. 

 

Exploring the links between poverty and disability in rural Bangladesh

DAVIS, Peter
May 2017

Expand view


This paper explores the links between poverty and disability drawing from 60 qualitative life-history interviews conducted in rural Bangladesh, in 48 households, in three districts, in March 2016. The paper provides insights into the relationship between poverty and disability with the aim of informing policy and practice concerned with both reducing poverty and improving the life chances of people with disabilities. All of the households had a person with a disability as a member, and in three households, two household members had a disability. Mechanisms by which poverty caused or exacerbated disabilities, and also how people with disabilities fell into poverty, were prevented from escaping poverty, and, in some cases, succeeded in escaping poverty are explored. 
 

Partnerships in mental healthcare service delivery in low-resource settings: developing an innovative network in rural Nepal

BIBHAV Acharya
et al
January 2017

Expand view

Abstract

Background

Mental illnesses are the largest contributors to the global burden of non-communicable diseases. However, there is extremely limited access to high quality, culturally-sensitive, and contextually-appropriate mental healthcare services. This situation persists despite the availability of interventions with proven efficacy to improve patient outcomes. A partnerships network is necessary for successful program adaptation and implementation.

Partnerships network

We describe our partnerships network as a case example that addresses challenges in delivering mental healthcare and which can serve as a model for similar settings. Our perspectives are informed from integrating mental healthcare services within a rural public hospital in Nepal. Our approach includes training and supervising generalist health workers by off-site psychiatrists. This is made possible by complementing the strengths and weaknesses of the various groups involved: the public sector, a non-profit organization that provides general healthcare services and one that specializes in mental health, a community advisory board, academic centers in high- and low-income countries, and bicultural professionals from the diaspora community.

Conclusions

We propose a partnerships model to assist implementation of promising programs to expand access to mental healthcare in low- resource settings. We describe the success and limitations of our current partners in a mental health program in rural Nepal.

Rights to water and sanitation for people with disabilities in Madagascar

VEROMAMINIAINA, Edith
RANDRIANARISOA, Ridjanirainy
December 2016

Expand view

"This paper illustrates the experiences of the Platform For People with Disabilities (PFPH), working with the support of WaterAid, to highlight and address the gaps in the realisation of the rights of people with disabilities in Madagascar. The focus has been on engaging the government on the National Inclusion Plan for people with disabilities, which includes water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). This pilot project was designed to increase access to safe WASH for people with disabilities through a human rights based approach. It focuses on strengthening the capacities of rights holders, as well as the capacity and the political will of duty bearers to fulfil their obligations towards the progressive realisation of rights. The project has strengthened the capacity of the PFPH to advocate for their rights and engage with government on all areas of their rights, although an increase in actual WASH provision is limited by the government’s lack of capacity and resources". 

7th RWSN Forum “Water for Everyone”, 7 ème Forum RWSN « L’eau pour tous » 29 Nov - 02 Dec 2016, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire

Sexual Abuse of Persons with Disabilities - Research

Rob Aley
et al
November 2016

Expand view

The aim of the research was to investigate the social, cultural and institutional factors which contribute to the high incidence of sexual abuse of persons with disabilities in East Africa and to identify interventions which could change detrimental attitudes, beliefs and practices which perpetuate this high incidence. The research is framed within the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD), particularly articles 12, 13 and 16.

The study used a qualitative participatory action research approach and worked with local partner organisations and Ugandan and Kenyan field level researchers to collect data. Survivors of sexual abuse were not interviewed but instead the research investigated the understandings, beliefs and practices of a range of service providers and key responders who are involved in the prevention of and response to sexual abuse against persons with disabilities in their communities. Groups consulted included police, teachers, health-care workers, government administrators, faith and community organisations and traditional leaders, as well as persons with disabilities and their parents. Participatory workshops were run with a reference group of people with disabilities (with a range of impairments and experiences) and relevant specialists at the initial stage and during the participatory analysis process. After initial orientation and training the field researchers undertook a total of 52 individual interviews and 9 focus group discussions with a range of stakeholders.

The overall findings show that social attitudes and understanding of disability and sexuality in general are strong influencing factors on the risks that persons with disability face in relation to sexual abuse. Participants reported a range of harmful attitudes and beliefs about disability and about the needs and rights of persons with disabilities. It is very common for cases of abuse to go unreported and to be dealt with at the family or community level, rather than being viewed as a serious criminal matter which should be taken to the formal authorities. Many barriers exist, especially at community level which mean abuse does not get reported. Lack of awareness and knowledge, stigma and exclusion and poverty were key drivers of continuing abuse and survivors of abuse seldom get proper support. Guidelines, training and clear procedures for good practice in the various professions were generally weak or absent. Key recommendations were generated for both community level interventions and in relation to policy and training at regional and national levels. The practical implementation of some recommendations was undertaken.

Sexual Abuse of Persons with Disabilities - Research

ALEY, Rob
et al
November 2016

Expand view

Abstract
The aim of the research was to investigate the social, cultural and institutional factors which contribute to the high incidence of sexual abuse of persons with disabilities in East Africa and to identify interventions which could change detrimental attitudes, beliefs and practices which perpetuate this high incidence. The research is framed within the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD), particularly articles 12, 13 and 16.

The study used a qualitative participatory action research approach and worked with local partner organisations and Ugandan and Kenyan field level researchers to collect data. Survivors of sexual abuse were not interviewed but instead the research investigated the understandings, beliefs and practices of a range of service providers and key responders who are involved in the prevention of and response to sexual abuse against persons with disabilities in their communities. Groups consulted included police, teachers, health-care workers, government administrators, faith and community organisations and traditional leaders, as well as persons with disabilities and their parents. Participatory workshops were run with a reference group of people with disabilities (with a range of impairments and experiences) and relevant specialists at the initial stage and during the participatory analysis process. After initial orientation and training the field researchers undertook a total of 52 individual interviews and 9 focus group discussions with a range of stakeholders.

The overall findings show that social attitudes and understanding of disability and sexuality in general are strong influencing factors on the risks that persons with disability face in relation to sexual abuse. Participants reported a range of harmful attitudes and beliefs about disability and about the needs and rights of persons with disabilities. It is very common for cases of abuse to go unreported and to be dealt with at the family or community level, rather than being viewed as a serious criminal matter which should be taken to the formal authorities. Many barriers exist, especially at community level which mean abuse does not get reported. Lack of awareness and knowledge, stigma and exclusion and poverty were key drivers of continuing abuse and survivors of abuse seldom get proper support. Guidelines, training and clear procedures for good practice in the various professions were generally weak or absent. Key recommendations were generated for both community level interventions and in relation to policy and training at regional and national levels. The practical implementation of some recommendations was undertaken.

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

Expand view

Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Strategy report on disaster risk management, reduction and response in Mongolia

JEGGLE, Terry
May 2013

Expand view

"The report summarizes the current Disaster Risk Management (DRM) situation in Mongolia and draws conclusions based on initial scoping assessments of the advisor. These observations underpin recommendations for further strategic policy and programme development in the country consistent with Government interests and through United Nations and wider international organizations’ involvement to strengthen the DRM and specifically disaster risk reduction (DRR) capacities of the institutional mechanisms, policies and regulatory frameworks in Mongolia. The author has based his analysis on present circumstances in the subject area since 2005, and it is projected from current conditions and suggested trends at the present time forward to anticipated needs and conditions up to 2020"

Barriers to sustainable access of children and families to ART centres in rural India : a report on operations research conducted in Maharashtra and Manipur

INDIA HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
December 2009

Expand view

This report identifies barriers that children and families face in accessing anti-retroviral therapy (ART) centres in rural India. The report also seeks to find solutions to these barriers based on an operations research conducted in Maharashtra Pradesh and Manipur. Operations research objectives: * To build an understanding among policy makers of the barriers faced by children and caregivers accessing ART services in rural communities. * To assess and highlight a basic minimum level of standards for ART centres in terms of adequacy, quality and timeliness of support needed. * To explore opportunities for linkages with state and district level departments and/or local self-governing institutions

Africa's health worker crisis - an interview with Dr Peter Ngatia

AFRICA MEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION (AMREF)
April 2009

Expand view

This interview with Dr Peter Ngatia, former faculty head at the Kenya Medical Training Centre, explores the critical lack of health workers of all levels throughout the continent of Africa and its implications. It also discusses programmes that have been set up to train community health workers to help provide at least minimum access to health care providers, particularly for rural communities

A custom distorted : beliefs about sexual abuse involving teenagers with intellectual disability at a rural setting in South Africa

PHASHA, N
MYAKA, Lucy
2009

Expand view

This paper is based upon the findings of a study that took place in a rural setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. It describes the social problem of sexual abuse of teenagers with intellectual disabilities by analyzing the roots of common misconceptions of intellectual disability, which render these teenagers vulnerable to sexual abuse. This paper is useful for anyone interested in learning more about disability and misconceptions of disability in Africa

Taking critical services to the home : scaling-up home-based maternal and postnatal care, including family planning, through community midwifery in Kenya

MWANGI, Annie
WARREN, Charlotte
2008

Expand view

This publication is the report of a project to scale-up a community-based model, in Kenya, that enabled women to give birth safely at home or be referred to a hospital when attended by a self-employed skilled midwife living in the community. The findings of the project were that community midwifery contributed to increasing the proportion of women assisted by skilled attendants during birth in the four districts in which the scheme was trialed, amounting to just under half of all skilled attended births in the districts. Although the skilled birth attendant rate in these districts was well below the national average of 42 percent, there was a steady increase in the proportion of attended deliveries since CMs were introduced in 2005. The districts also reported an increase in postnatal assessments in the first 48 hours and increase in immunization coverage

Teacher absence as a factor in gender inequalities in access to primary schooling in rural Pakistan

GHUMAN, Sharon
LLOYD, Cynthia B.
June 2007

Expand view

Public-sector education in many countries in western and southern Asia, including Pakistan, is characterised by separate schools for boys and girls at the primary and secondary levels. In Pakistan, primary school enrolment among girls in rural areas is substantially lower than among children in urban areas and boys in rural areas, owing to lack of access to government girls’ schools. The focus of this report is on teacher absence as a further barrier to schooling for girls. Absence rates among the all-female teachers in government girls’ schools are substantially higher than among the all-male teachers in government boys’ schools. Whether they teach in government or private schools, women who live in the same community as the school are substantially less likely to be absent. In government girls’ schools, better basic amenities are also related to lower teacher absence. Both findings suggest the importance of recent government investments in schools and the higher inter-village travel costs faced by women relative to men

Providing new opportunities to adolescent girls in socially conservative settings : the Ishraq program in rural Upper Egypt

BRADY, Martha
et al
2007

Expand view

Out-of-school girls are among the most disadvantaged adolescents in rural Upper Egypt. Compared with girls attending school, they are more likely to be engaged in poorly paid farm work, more likely to be married early, and at greater risk for early childbearing and poor pregnancy outcomes. To respond to their situation, the Ishraq program was designed: a holistic intervention to address the unmet needs of out-of-school adolescent girls. The pilot phase of Ishraq was launched in four rural villages of one of the country's poorest regions through the partnership of Caritas, the Center for Development and Population Activities, the Population Council, and Save the Children. This research report provides data from the baseline and endline surveys conducted during the pilot

A community-based health education programme for bio-environmental control of malaria through folk theatre (Kalajatha) in rural India

GHOSH, Susanta K
et al
December 2006

Expand view

Kalajatha is a popular, traditional art form of folk theatre depicting various life processes of a local socio-cultural setting. It is an effective medium of mass communication in the Indian sub-continent especially in rural areas. Using this medium, an operational feasibility health education programme was carried out for malaria control. This study was carried out under the primary health care system involving the local community and various potential partners

Ben ni walen : let’s agree and take action|Mobilizing for human rights using participatory theatre

SGANGA, Cristina
VISSER, Teun
2006

Expand view

"This Guide is a basic introduction to using participatory methods for exploring human rights issues with people in rural communities to encourage human rights organisations to adopt a long-term approach to raising human rights awareness Section I presents the background to the writing of the Guide and its context. It explains the approach proposed to mobilise rural communities, and it introduces the different components of participatory research and participatory theatre methodology. Section II contains information on the range of participatory theatre methods, and provides illustrative examples of how to use them to explore human rights issues with rural communities. Background information on the specific human rights issues used as examples is also included. The guide contains basic guidelines and suggestions rather than giving step-by-step directions on how to develop programmes, and users are encouraged to adapt the methods and adjust any part of the Guide to suit their own circumstances. This guide is useful for Human right organisations, theatre directors and group, and community development organisations"

CBD research in Muheza district : final report for Tanzanian German Programme to Support Health (TGPSH)/GTZ

SIMBA, Daudi O
November 2005

Expand view

This study was done to determine the extent to which Community Based Distribution (CBD) reaches the poor compared with health facilities. It found that contraceptive prevalence rate in the CBD area was 32 per cent, more than double the national figures for rural areas. People from all wealth categories had equal access to contraceptive services from CBD agents. It is therefore likely that the presence of CBD agents increases the access of the poor to family planning services. Interestingly, adolescents, men, and Catholics were more likely to use CBD services to access contraceptives, than older women and people from other religions

Voices from Zambian communities : experiences of HIV/AIDS related treatment in urban and rural settings. A report of community consultations on HIV/AIDS-related treatment in urban and rural Zambia, 2002-2003 with a practical guide on consulting individua

INTERNATIONAL HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
2004

Expand view

This report summarises the findings of two community consultations carried out in Zambia. It amalgamates the two separate reports originally published on the Alliance website as "Voices from the community" (November 2002) and "Voices from rural communities" (May 2003). The two consultations aimed to learn about individual and community perceptions, knowledge and experiences of HIV/AIDS and related treatment. This included questions on ARV treatment and the importance and scope of the involvement of people with HIV and their communities in planning and implementing treatment programmes. The consultations were carried out by multi-disciplinary teams, used participatory methods and involved a wide variety of community members, including people with HIV, local leaders and health workers. The community consultations showed that for communities to realise their potential as a valuable resource for ART treatment, people need information and education as well as effective clinical care and support

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates