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Diarrhoea : why children are still dying and what can be done

2009

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This website focuses on a package of proven prevention and treatment measures for diarrhoea. It is divided into sections which include: the global burden of diarrhoea, the basics of diarrhoeal diseases; where we stand today in preventing and treating childhood diarrhoea; and a seven-point plan for comprehensive diarrhoeal control. The website is a version of the UNICEF/WHO report 'Diarrhoea: why children are still dying and what can be done'. It would be useful to the general public, health workers, government, NGOs, United Nations organisations, policy makers and private sector workers

Diarrhoea : why children are still dying and what can be done

WHITE JOHANSSON, Emily
WARD, Tessa
et al
2009

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"The objective of this WHO/UNICEF report is to focus attention on the prevention and management of diarrhoeal diseases as central to improving child survival. It examines the latest available information on the burden and distribution of childhood diarrhoea. It also analyses how well countries are doing in making available key interventions proven to reduce its toll. Most importantly, it lays out a new strategy for diarrhoea control, one that is based on interventions drawn from different sectors that have demonstrated potential to save children’s lives. It sets out a 7-point plan that includes a treatment package to reduce childhood diarrhoea deaths, as well as a prevention package to make a lasting reduction in the diarrhoea burden in the medium to long term"

Benchmark surveys on childhood immunization in Thailand, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Tanzania

PRINCETON SURVEY RESEARCH ASSOCIATES (PSRA)
1999

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Far fewer children than in the past are threatened by polio, diphtheria and measles thanks to the administration of basic vaccines through national immunization programmes. Nonetheless, a new generation of vaccines targeting other illnesses has not been as widely embraced. To begin to address this problem, surveys were undertaken of health care professionals, primarily pediatricians and general practitioners, and non-health care professionals, including health policy planners in the ministries of health and finance, officers at NGOs dealing with health issues, journalists who cover health care, academics and religious leaders, in Africa and Asia. This research was undertaken in order to develop a basic model of the decision making process that health professionals employ when considering whether to add vaccines to their national immunization programmes. This paper documents the findings of this exercise, and probes health workers' attitudes toward new vaccines in general, and toward the vaccines for Hib and rotavirus specifically

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