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Understanding the interaction of competence standards and reasonable adjustments

HEWLETT, Katherine
NIGHTINGALE, Christine
STEVENS, Tony
July 2015

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“Higher education institutions (HEIs) have responsibility for developing non-discriminatory competence standards, and designing a study programme to address these competence standards. HEIs also have the responsibility to ensure that assessment methods address the competence standards. Adjustments to ways that competence standards are assessed may be required so that disabled students are not put at a disadvantage in demonstrating their achievement. This guidance aims to support HEIs meet these institutional and legal responsibilities, and promote disability equality” by providing information and examples on key areas. The guidance will be of use to all staff involved in developing and assessing competence standards

Access to independent advocacy : an evidence review

TOWNSLEY, Ruth
MARRIOT, Anna
WARD, Linda
October 2009

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This report presents the findings of an evidence review investigating the costs, benefits and effectiveness of advocacy support for disabled people in the UK. The review examines the following four situations where disabled people are particularly at risk of losing choice and control over their lives: during transition to adulthood; when the children of disabled parents are subject to safeguarding procedures; when entry to residential care is a possibility; and when disabled people are victims or alleged perpetrators of anti-social behaviour. The executive summary, report and an easy to read version are available in downloadable pdf format. A framework for research on costs and benefits of independent advocacy is also provided. Audio and braille versions of the executive summary, the full report and the framework for research are available on request

Report of PLACE assessments in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, Central Asia : 2002 and 2003

ABDULLAEV, Shukharat
et al
July 2004

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This is a report on two PLACE assessments conducted in Tashkent in 2002 and 2003. The aim was to investigate whether there was an overlap in drug use and sexual networks, and to identify the implications for HIV prevention. The findings suggest that there is a significant overlap among youth, drug users and sex workers, and that the rate of new partnership formation remains high, while condom availability has decreased. It suggests that interventions need to focus on the sites where youth and drug users socialise and where sex workers solicit clients

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