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Studies and research at Handicap International : promoting ethical data management

BRUS, Aude
September 2015

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This guide explains the importance of ethical data collection and management. Using Handicap International’s decades experience implementing projects and programmes globally, the report highlights the impact of data collection and the importance of implementing ethical approaches in a variety of situations where data is being collected. It aims to raise the awareness of Handicap International’s operational and technical staff and their partners to the ethical questions to be considered when managing data (preparation, collection, processing, analysis and sharing of information). It reaffirms the ethical principles underpinning the organisation’s actions and concludes with eight ethical recommendations that are applicable to studies and/or research in our intervention settings

Making it work guideline

GUY, Michael
September 2011

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Making it Work is a methodology for researching and documenting good practices on key disability issues, and then using this evidence to carry out effective advocacy in line with the principles of the Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities .The methodology is straight-forward: it can be used to develop projects on any disability issue, in any country, at any level, by all types of organizations. Indeed many organizations throughout the world are now using this approach and sharing their good practice research and recommendations online. This guideline sets out a step-by-step approach for implementing such projects

Systems thinking for health systems strengthening

Eds
2009

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This third report knits together earlier work by accelerating a more realistic understanding of what works in strengthening health systems, for whom and under what circumstances. Its primary goal is to catalyse new conceptual thinking on health systems, system-level interventions, and health system strengthening

Evaluation and utilization of traditional methods of communication in Cameroon's central, southern, eastern and extreme northern regions : case study 20

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO). Communication for Development Group
August 2003

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This study's main objectives are to evaluate traditional means of communication; to note their constraints; to select the traditional methods which can best be used for the diffusion of information and to devise a strategy for implementing the selected method of traditional communication. The methodology of this survey is based on the Active Method of Participative Research.
The study illustrates that the traditional media for communication in Cameroon are: the gong and songs accompanied by dances (in all of the surveyed provinces); the xylophone (in the center and south); griot [travelling poet] and balafon (in the east); colleagues of the traditional chiefs (Lawanes, Djaoros); and messengers of traditional chiefs or muezzins (extreme north).There are numerous constraints to using individuals in devising communications strategies: a lack of trained musicians, the lack of initiative on the part of the village elders, the disinterest of the youth, conflict among the different generations, the proliferation of modern communications technologies, the complexity of training in various methods, the possible alteration of messages, a lack of motivation and the slow speed of transmission. The study notes that the best methods for the diffusion of information in the regions surveyed in Cameroon are: the gong, the colleagues and messengers of traditional chiefs to organize village meetings in which reproductive health issues could be raised, singing and dancing, travelling poets and xylophones.
In order to devise effective strategies for conveying messages about reproductive health through these traditional methods of communication, traditional authorities must be engaged early on in the process and informed of the importance of these means of communication; qualified individuals must be identified as resources and others trained; and a training of trainers must be conducted

How can we learn more from what we do? Evaluation and evidence-based communications for development : summary record of workshop

EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR DEVELOPMENT POLICY MANAGEMENT (ECDPM)
EXCHANGE PROGRAMME
2003

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This workshop report summarises presentations and discussion addressing issues such as: how can the learning and social/organisational change function of evaluation best be balanced with the control/accountability function? How can what we learn feed debate and change processes within organisations, among partners and in society at large? What linkages exist between the different levels? How can evidence from evaluations help spur national debate on policy options for development and motivate home-grown change processes?

Health : an ecosystem approach

LEBEL, Jean
2003

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Can people remain healthy in a world that is sick? Many ecological disasters can be directly traced to careless exploitation of the environment, with human beings as first perpetrator and then victim. Our health closely mirrors the health of our surroundings: this is the basis of the Ecohealth approach. It recognizes the links between humans and their biophysical, social, and economic environments, and that these links are reflected in the population's state of health. This is a new area of research, requiring input from scientists, community and interest groups, and decision-makers. This book describes this new approach, providing lessons and recommendations from various IDRC-supported research activities. It demonstrates how decision-makers, in particular, can use the ecohealth approach to formulate policies and solutions that are both immediately visible and sustainable over the long term

Adaptech

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This website is sponsored by the Adaptech Research Network, which consists of teams of academics, students and consumers. They conduct research on computer technology utilised by disabled students in Canadian colleges and universities. This website chronicles their work and shares their findings. Useful for anyone with an interest in assistive technologies and disability

Making it work

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL

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This website provides information about Making it Work (MIW), a global multi-stakeholder initiative to promote effective implementation of the Convention for the Right of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The initiative aims to collect and exchange examples of good practice and to use this to influence policy development in line with the CRPD. The MIW website highlights general information about the initiative and specific information about exisitng MIW projects and reports. It provides access to a series of user-friendly tools and resources to support practitioners working in the field of disability and development. The MIW Guidelines are available in downloadable pdf format in English, French and Spanish. A resource library is provided with links to CRPD-related information, disability and development topics and a news archive. This website is a useful tool for anyone working on disability rights issues

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